LGBTQIA Thread |OT5| Can't even drink straight

Status
Not open for further replies.
Dec 31, 2005
19,830
0
1,230
Short stories and Classics from the last 500 years would be great!

If you know a great book about Race and Gender, I'm all up for it too!
Some classics I really liked...

Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen
Decameron, by Giovanni Boccaccio (also fits on the short stories list!)
Don Quixote, by Miguel de Cervantes
The Brothers Karamazov, by Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Count of Monte Cristo, by Alexandre Dumas
Madame Bovary, by Gustave Flaubert
The Sorrows of Young Werther, by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, by James Joyce
Love in the Time of Cholera, by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Song of Solomon, by Toni Morrison
Lolita, by Vladimir Nabokov
Gulliver's Travels, by Jonathan Swift
Candide, by Voltaire
The Story of the Stone, by Cao Xueqin

Some short story collections...


Cosmicomics, by Italo Calvino
Invisible Cities, by Italo Calvino
But Beautiful: A Book About Jazz, by Geoff Dyers
The Wind's Twelve Quarters, by Ursula K. Le Guin
The Safety of Objects: Stories, by A.M. Homes
Dubliners, by James Joyce
Seiobo There Below, by László Krasznahorkai
The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories, by H.P. Lovecraft
The Stories of Vladimir Nabokov, by Vladimir Nabokov
There Once Lived a Girl Who Seduced Her Sister's Husband and He Hanged Himself: Love Stories, by Ludmilla Petrushevskaya
The Complete Short Stories of Marcel Proust, by Marcel Proust
Civilwarland in Bad Decline, by George Saunders
The Melancholy of Mechagirl, by Catherynne M. Valente

I'll post something about race / gender when I have more time!

Some books about race / gender / sexuality:

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, by Michelle Alexander
The Souls of Black Folk, by W.E.B. Du Bois
Racism Without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States, by Eduardo Bonilla-Silva
Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World 1890 - 1940, by George Chauncey
What's Wrong With Homosexuality?, by John Corvino
Homosexuality and Civilization, by Louis Crompton
Dispossession: Discrimination Against African American Farmers in the Age of Civil Rights, by Pete Daniel
Women, Race, and Class, by Angela Y. Davis
Homosexual Desire in Revolutionary Russia: The Regulation of Sexual and Gender Dissent, by Dan Healey
How the Irish Became White, by Noel Ignatiev
When Affirmative Action Was White: An Untold History of Racial Inequality in Twentieth-Century America, by Ira Katznelson
Men & Masculinities: A Social, Cultural, and History Encyclopedia, by Michael Kimmel
Guyland: The Perilous World Where Boys Become Men, by Michael Kimmel
Men & Masculinities: A Social, Cultural, and History Encyclopedia, by Michael Kimmel
The Gendered Society, by Michael Kimmel
Out of the Past: Gay and Lesbian History from 1869 to the Present, by Neil Miller
The Long Arc of Justice: Lesbian and Gay Marriage, Equality, and Rights, by Richard D. Mohr
Dude, You're a Fag: Masculinity and Sexuality in High School, by C.J. Pascoe
Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty, by Dorothy Roberts
Family Properties: Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America, by Beryl Satter
Just One of the Guys?: Transgender Men and the Persistence of Gender Inequality, by Kristen Schilt
Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity, by Julia Serano
Challenging Casanova: Beyond the Stereotype of the Promiscuous Male, by Andrew P. Smiler
Sexual Harassment and Bullying: A Guide to Keeping Kids Safe and Holding Schools Accountable, by Susan Strauss
Deep Secrets: Boys' Friendships and the Crisis of Connection, by Niobe Way
The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration, by Isabel Wilkerson
 
Jun 3, 2013
9,201
0
0
Austria
That's a whole lot of books, did you read all of them?

I'm still not finished with Gay New York. I may have to cut down the time I spend on GAF and focus more on reading that (and other books in my backlog) in my free time. >.>

I've been feeling incredibly frustrated this whole week and I have no idea why. I've had to distract myself by playing games or listening to music because otherwise I start getting super frustrated and pissed for no reason :l any advice?
Hm, I believe it's best to just give yourself more time to think about what the source of all this anger could be. Don't distract yourself and instead try to go into yourself, maybe take a few walks or relax on the bed without any music or TV playing.

Hope that helps somehow. =)

Top of page post, so... here:

He can cook dinner for me anytime.
Yum.
For me too. I'm so hungry, haven't eaten a proper meal in two days or so. -.-
 
Mar 21, 2010
9,093
0
600
Austin, TX
So my friend and I drove to New Orleans a few weeks back (I live in Austin) and we decided to survey the gay scenes we pass through and see if we get different reception on different gay apps based on our racial features, since I'm arabic and he's black. Sure enough passing through rural Texas was the first time I've ever received sort of derogatory messages from strangers on there, several moments like these:

- Are you arab?
- Yes
- Too bad

- You're cute for a middle eastern

- What language you speak?
- English and Arabic
- Weird

- Ew a muslim

- Go away sand n*****


I wasn't offended coz idiots are idiots, but I guess I'm always surprised when gay people present racial prejudices so confrontationally and I assume it's coz they think they get a free pass because they're already a "minority." Either way, I thought my friend would get more weird messages but he was apparently golden, lol. And of course the moment we leave rural buttfuck Texas the messages turned a full 180.

I was a hit in New Orleans though. Anyone else find themselves to be received better in the superficial sense by certain places or groups of people?
 
Oct 27, 2012
9,582
1
390
So my friend and I drove to New Orleans a few weeks back (I live in Austin) and we decided to survey the gay scenes we pass through and see if we get different reception on different gay apps based on our racial features, since I'm arabic and he's black. Sure enough passing through rural Texas was the first time I've ever received sort of derogatory messages from strangers on there, several moments like these:

- Are you arab?
- Yes
- Too bad

- You're cute for a middle eastern

- What language you speak?
- English and Arabic
- Weird

- Ew a muslim

- Go away sand n*****


I wasn't offended coz idiots are idiots, but I guess I'm always surprised when gay people present racial prejudices so confrontationally and I assume it's coz they think they get a free pass because they're already a "minority." Either way, I thought my friend would get more weird messages but he was apparently golden, lol. And of course the moment we leave rural buttfuck Texas the messages turned a full 180.

I was a hit in New Orleans though. Anyone else find themselves to be received better in the superficial sense by certain places or groups of people?
What does it mean to be golden?
 
So my friend and I drove to New Orleans a few weeks back (I live in Austin) and we decided to survey the gay scenes we pass through and see if we get different reception on different gay apps based on our racial features, since I'm arabic and he's black. Sure enough passing through rural Texas was the first time I've ever received sort of derogatory messages from strangers on there, several moments like these:

- Are you arab?
- Yes
- Too bad

- You're cute for a middle eastern

- What language you speak?
- English and Arabic
- Weird

- Ew a muslim

- Go away sand n*****


I wasn't offended coz idiots are idiots, but I guess I'm always surprised when gay people present racial prejudices so confrontationally and I assume it's coz they think they get a free pass because they're already a "minority." Either way, I thought my friend would get more weird messages but he was apparently golden, lol. And of course the moment we leave rural buttfuck Texas the messages turned a full 180.

I was a hit in New Orleans though. Anyone else find themselves to be received better in the superficial sense by certain places or groups of people?
NO is best.
 
May 24, 2013
18,155
0
530
We lived in Austin for 10 years, and did our very best to spend at little time as possible in the tiny places between Austin and NOLA. Drive, stop at a gas station or fast food joint, immediately return to car. The rural South can be friggin' scary..
I remember one time when my mom had her little side business selling jewelry and we had booked for a little festival in a rural town in GA. Worst feeling ever being the only black vendor there. Lots of staring. We didn't stay long mainly because we didn't sell much. This town was basically a one stoplight town, it was so small. Just plain awkward.
 
Feb 22, 2011
5,941
0
0
São Paulo, Brazil
So my friend and I drove to New Orleans a few weeks back (I live in Austin) and we decided to survey the gay scenes we pass through and see if we get different reception on different gay apps based on our racial features, since I'm arabic and he's black. Sure enough passing through rural Texas was the first time I've ever received sort of derogatory messages from strangers on there, several moments like these:

- Are you arab?
- Yes
- Too bad

- You're cute for a middle eastern

- What language you speak?
- English and Arabic
- Weird

- Ew a muslim

- Go away sand n*****


I wasn't offended coz idiots are idiots, but I guess I'm always surprised when gay people present racial prejudices so confrontationally and I assume it's coz they think they get a free pass because they're already a "minority." Either way, I thought my friend would get more weird messages but he was apparently golden, lol. And of course the moment we leave rural buttfuck Texas the messages turned a full 180.

I was a hit in New Orleans though. Anyone else find themselves to be received better in the superficial sense by certain places or groups of people?
I <3 middle eastern men. Lebanese Brazilians are amazing, I had a huge crush on this gorgeous guy of Lebanese (I think) descent that I saw every day in my previous job. Perfect body, perfect beard. Damn I miss staring at him during lunch break.
 
Feb 20, 2011
2,077
0
0
So my friend and I drove to New Orleans a few weeks back (I live in Austin) and we decided to survey the gay scenes we pass through and see if we get different reception on different gay apps based on our racial features, since I'm arabic and he's black. Sure enough passing through rural Texas was the first time I've ever received sort of derogatory messages from strangers on there, several moments like these:

- Are you arab?
- Yes
- Too bad

- You're cute for a middle eastern

- What language you speak?
- English and Arabic
- Weird

- Ew a muslim

- Go away sand n*****


I wasn't offended coz idiots are idiots, but I guess I'm always surprised when gay people present racial prejudices so confrontationally and I assume it's coz they think they get a free pass because they're already a "minority." Either way, I thought my friend would get more weird messages but he was apparently golden, lol. And of course the moment we leave rural buttfuck Texas the messages turned a full 180.

I was a hit in New Orleans though. Anyone else find themselves to be received better in the superficial sense by certain places or groups of people?
Wow that sucks for you two :/ but at least you had a much better experience once you got out of that shit hole area.
 
Apr 5, 2012
18,078
0
0
Arizona
So my friend and I drove to New Orleans a few weeks back (I live in Austin) and we decided to survey the gay scenes we pass through and see if we get different reception on different gay apps based on our racial features, since I'm arabic and he's black. Sure enough passing through rural Texas was the first time I've ever received sort of derogatory messages from strangers on there, several moments like these:

- Are you arab?
- Yes
- Too bad

- You're cute for a middle eastern

- What language you speak?
- English and Arabic
- Weird

- Ew a muslim

- Go away sand n*****


I wasn't offended coz idiots are idiots, but I guess I'm always surprised when gay people present racial prejudices so confrontationally and I assume it's coz they think they get a free pass because they're already a "minority." Either way, I thought my friend would get more weird messages but he was apparently golden, lol. And of course the moment we leave rural buttfuck Texas the messages turned a full 180.

I was a hit in New Orleans though. Anyone else find themselves to be received better in the superficial sense by certain places or groups of people?
It blows my mind that people can be so fucking stupid like... it's so funny to think that idiots like these use racial slurs but are immediately in tears when someone uses the "f" word. Dumbasses.
 
Jun 3, 2013
9,201
0
0
Austria
It's Mumei, of course he has! I'm an English student, so I own literally hundreds of books I haven't even read yet!

... I really need to stay out of book stores. ><
I have the same problem. I still have around eighty or so books in my book shelfs that I haven't read.

But I still keep on buying them. Last time I went I got another two Thomas Bernhard books even though I know perfectly well that he's difficult to read and that it will be quite some time until I get around to them. >.>
 
Jun 1, 2013
3,096
0
0
So my friend and I drove to New Orleans a few weeks back (I live in Austin) and we decided to survey the gay scenes we pass through and see if we get different reception on different gay apps based on our racial features, since I'm arabic and he's black. Sure enough passing through rural Texas was the first time I've ever received sort of derogatory messages from strangers on there, several moments like these:
[snip]
That's awful, sorry to hear it. Sucks people can still be so closeminded like that. Guys of all kinds can be hot, sad more people don't see that.

Yeah, I know it shouldn't, but it blows my mind that oppressed minorities can be discriminatory themselves.
Assholes come in all kinds, sadly. While being a minority can help give us a perspective and empathy to try and avoid discrimination, it's still up to people to use that empathy. We can hope they grow and change though. I did as I became an adult, and my eyes were better opened to the issues other minorities face.

What does it mean to be golden?
King Midas got a little too handsy.
It means everything is good.
 
Oct 27, 2012
9,582
1
390
I have the same problem. I still have around eighty or so books in my book shelfs that I haven't read.

But I still keep on buying them. Last time I went I got another two Thomas Bernhard books even though I know perfectly well that he's difficult to read and that it will be quite some time until I get around to them. >.>
The books I have are from school that we had to read and that's it. I really hate that I'm terrible at reading books. I'll be doing the 50/50 challenge even though I know I will fail miserably.

At least some of Mumei's suggestions seem very interesting, especially the ones about sexuality, race and gender:

Some books about race / gender / sexuality:

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, by Michelle Alexander
The Souls of Black Folk, by W.E.B. Du Bois
Racism Without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States, by Eduardo Bonilla-Silva
Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World 1890 - 1940, by George Chauncey
What's Wrong With Homosexuality?, by John Corvino
Homosexuality and Civilization, by Louis Crompton
Dispossession: Discrimination Against African American Farmers in the Age of Civil Rights, by Pete Daniel
Women, Race, and Class, by Angela Y. Davis
Homosexual Desire in Revolutionary Russia: The Regulation of Sexual and Gender Dissent, by Dan Healey
How the Irish Became White, by Noel Ignatiev
When Affirmative Action Was White: An Untold History of Racial Inequality in Twentieth-Century America, by Ira Katznelson
Men & Masculinities: A Social, Cultural, and History Encyclopedia, by Michael Kimmel
Guyland: The Perilous World Where Boys Become Men, by Michael Kimmel
Men & Masculinities: A Social, Cultural, and History Encyclopedia, by Michael Kimmel
The Gendered Society, by Michael Kimmel
Out of the Past: Gay and Lesbian History from 1869 to the Present, by Neil Miller
The Long Arc of Justice: Lesbian and Gay Marriage, Equality, and Rights, by Richard D. Mohr
Dude, You're a Fag: Masculinity and Sexuality in High School, by C.J. Pascoe
Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty, by Dorothy Roberts
Family Properties: Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America, by Beryl Satter
Just One of the Guys?: Transgender Men and the Persistence of Gender Inequality, by Kristen Schilt
Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity, by Julia Serano
Challenging Casanova: Beyond the Stereotype of the Promiscuous Male, by Andrew P. Smiler
Sexual Harassment and Bullying: A Guide to Keeping Kids Safe and Holding Schools Accountable, by Susan Strauss
Deep Secrets: Boys' Friendships and the Crisis of Connection, by Niobe Way
The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration, by Isabel Wilkerson
Does anyone have a recommendation for LGBT erotic novels? Not 50 shades of grey erotic, but something more soft... and with an LGBT appeal. I feel like there aren't many out there, but then again I rarely read so I might be wrong.
 
Dec 31, 2005
19,830
0
1,230
Does anyone have a recommendation for LGBT erotic novels? Not 50 shades of grey erotic, but something more soft... and with an LGBT appeal. I feel like there aren't many out there, but then again I rarely read so I might be wrong.
No idea. It seems like the sort of thing that you'd have to wade through too much garbage to find something good, though.

That's a whole lot of books, did you read all of them?

I'm still not finished with Gay New York. I may have to cut down the time I spend on GAF and focus more on reading that (and other books in my backlog) in my free time. >.>
I did, and you're the first person on GAF who I can remember that is reading / has read Gay New York. It's fascinating history.

It's Mumei, of course he has! I'm an English student, so I own literally hundreds of books I haven't even read yet!

... I really need to stay out of book stores. ><
I'm not an English student so I don't even have this excuse for my unread books. :(
 
Jun 3, 2013
9,201
0
0
Austria
The books I have are from school that we had to read and that's it. I really hate that I'm terrible at reading books. I'll be doing the 50/50 challenge even though I know I will fail miserably.
Oh, you will be able to figure that out for yourself, I'm sure. Just read books with themes that you like or about topics that you are interested to learn more about.

I did, and you're the first person on GAF who I can remember that is reading / has read Gay New York. It's fascinating history.
It is, just a shame I haven't dedicated enough time to completing it.
 
What does that even mean? Are Batman and Robin considered gay?
Not ordinary Batman and Robin, those are Schumacher's Batman and Robin, with Bat-Nipples and Bat-Asses ;)
But yes, those slides are really embarrassing and immature; and, unfortunately, apparently legal. Those shots were published in Famitsu and you can see Ninja Theory's logo in the bottom right corner. That means they did show it someone publicly. :|

why is Dante posing between the two BrokeBack Mountain cow-boys?
Because obviously original Dante is gay.

Some books about race / gender / sexuality:

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, by Michelle Alexander
The Souls of Black Folk, by W.E.B. Du Bois
Racism Without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States, by Eduardo Bonilla-Silva
Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World 1890 - 1940, by George Chauncey
What's Wrong With Homosexuality?, by John Corvino
Homosexuality and Civilization, by Louis Crompton
Dispossession: Discrimination Against African American Farmers in the Age of Civil Rights, by Pete Daniel
Women, Race, and Class, by Angela Y. Davis
Homosexual Desire in Revolutionary Russia: The Regulation of Sexual and Gender Dissent, by Dan Healey
How the Irish Became White, by Noel Ignatiev
When Affirmative Action Was White: An Untold History of Racial Inequality in Twentieth-Century America, by Ira Katznelson
Men & Masculinities: A Social, Cultural, and History Encyclopedia, by Michael Kimmel
Guyland: The Perilous World Where Boys Become Men, by Michael Kimmel
Men & Masculinities: A Social, Cultural, and History Encyclopedia, by Michael Kimmel
The Gendered Society, by Michael Kimmel
Out of the Past: Gay and Lesbian History from 1869 to the Present, by Neil Miller
The Long Arc of Justice: Lesbian and Gay Marriage, Equality, and Rights, by Richard D. Mohr
Dude, You're a Fag: Masculinity and Sexuality in High School, by C.J. Pascoe
Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty, by Dorothy Roberts
Family Properties: Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America, by Beryl Satter
Just One of the Guys?: Transgender Men and the Persistence of Gender Inequality, by Kristen Schilt
Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity, by Julia Serano
Challenging Casanova: Beyond the Stereotype of the Promiscuous Male, by Andrew P. Smiler
Sexual Harassment and Bullying: A Guide to Keeping Kids Safe and Holding Schools Accountable, by Susan Strauss
Deep Secrets: Boys' Friendships and the Crisis of Connection, by Niobe Way
The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration, by Isabel Wilkerson
Just an idea: since questions about good LGBT-themed movies, shows and books appear every now and then in this thread, maybe we should put such a list in the OP? It would be easier to find or refer it than looking through hundreds of posts.


So my friend and I drove to New Orleans a few weeks back (I live in Austin) and we decided to survey the gay scenes we pass through and see if we get different reception on different gay apps based on our racial features, since I'm arabic and he's black. Sure enough passing through rural Texas was the first time I've ever received sort of derogatory messages from strangers on there, several moments like these:

[...]

I wasn't offended coz idiots are idiots, but I guess I'm always surprised when gay people present racial prejudices so confrontationally and I assume it's coz they think they get a free pass because they're already a "minority." Either way, I thought my friend would get more weird messages but he was apparently golden, lol. And of course the moment we leave rural buttfuck Texas the messages turned a full 180.
It boggles my mind that people who themselves experience intolerance and are constantly exposed to hate speech and bullying on daily basis lack empathy. I can understand that one don't have to like everybody, but fuck, at least be try to avoid being hateful and using derogatory language. :/
 
Sep 25, 2010
21,280
4
0
Colombia
www.facebook.com
Youre just dating me for my culture!

No, baby. I love your...uh, your luscious lips.
It's a good perk :p

Sort of? I mean, in the past year and a half of dating my girlfriend I've learned a ton, but it's not necessarily 'open' to me as a non-Muslim.
Do you think there are big differences between how you both see the world?
 
Mar 21, 2010
9,093
0
600
Austin, TX
It boggles my mind that people who themselves experience intolerance and are constantly exposed to hate speech and bullying on daily basis lack empathy. I can understand that one don't have to like everybody, but fuck, at least be try to avoid being hateful and using derogatory language. :/
I think when you deal with derogatory language and are on the receiving end of it, you start to inherit the characteristics of the attacker sort of sub-consciously. The same way bullying tends to come from a place of insecurity, people who hate are doing it as a way to cope with a lack of self-love in some capacity. It's frustrating when you see it in everyday places like fucking Grindr because these are people all around us, but it's more sad than anything.

What does it mean to be golden?


As in he didn't have any issues or receive demeaning messages.
 
Oct 27, 2012
9,582
1
390
I think when you deal with derogatory language and are on the receiving end of it, you start to inherit the characteristics of the attacker sort of sub-consciously. The same way bullying tends to come from a place of insecurity, people who hate are doing it as a way to cope with a lack of self-love in some capacity. It's frustrating when you see it in everyday places like fucking Grindr because these are people all around us, but it's more sad than anything.
Do you think it's somewhat related or stemming from internalized hate?
 
Mar 21, 2010
9,093
0
600
Austin, TX
Do you think it's somewhat related or stemming from internalized hate?
For sure, in many different capacities I think. You inherit these rules about the world based on the experiences you've gone through, which then makes your subconscience rely on these rules when need be and project them back out to the universe. Speaking from my own experience, when I grew up in Lebanon I dealt with a lot of violence/harrassment/bullying both around me and directed at me, and to this day I still carry trust issues with people that takes me a while to get over. The same reason I only like sitting in corners in restaurants, or that I don't like sitting in the front of classrooms, that's my subconscience telling me "be careful, someone might sneak up on you if you're not careful", lol. In the case of racist people on Grindr, another element of it is wanting a part of you to be on the "attacker" side of something as a rebellion against a general feeling of victimhood. Like a "take back the power" scenario except all you're doing is getting less love back than you probably want. Like Hitler. lol
 
Dec 23, 2013
6,326
0
0
Vancouver
So my friend and I drove to New Orleans a few weeks back (I live in Austin) and we decided to survey the gay scenes we pass through and see if we get different reception on different gay apps based on our racial features, since I'm arabic and he's black. Sure enough passing through rural Texas was the first time I've ever received sort of derogatory messages from strangers on there, several moments like these:

- Are you arab?
- Yes
- Too bad

- You're cute for a middle eastern

- What language you speak?
- English and Arabic
- Weird

- Ew a muslim

- Go away sand n*****
Wow, this was a really sad read :/ I'm so sorry about this. People like this absolutely suck. Was this on Grindr? It just sorta confirms why I deleted the app about a year ago :S. I couldn't handle being called fat anymore X_X
 

Cosmic Bus

pristine morning snow
Jun 20, 2004
14,002
0
1,490
40
Seattle
www.last.fm
Does anyone have a recommendation for LGBT erotic novels? Not 50 shades of grey erotic, but something more soft... and with an LGBT appeal. I feel like there aren't many out there, but then again I rarely read so I might be wrong.


Pulp Friction is a collection of erotic stories written in the '50s and '60s; Call Me By Your Name is more contemporary, although set in the '70s and '80s, and is an absolutely wonderful book that also happens to have a number of very sensual sections.
 
Aug 14, 2013
5,813
0
365
Croatia
Seconding Mr_Zombie's suggestion for the OP.

My brother gave it to me at Christmas. I always was intrigued by it, and I've seen it a lot at other friends' house.

If you've got any book suggestions I'm all ears! I don't really have a favorite genre, even though I thought this would be the perfect time to catch up on some classics I've missed.
Maus is a classic and definitely one of my favorite books in general. You'll love it, I'm sure.

As for book suggestions, here's one which is LGBT-themed, but aimed at all audiences. I absolutely loved it, and so will anyone who decides to read it.



Does anyone have a recommendation for LGBT erotic novels? Not 50 shades of grey erotic, but something more soft... and with an LGBT appeal. I feel like there aren't many out there, but then again I rarely read so I might be wrong.
Here's one.



It's a coming-of-age story with elements of gay erotica. For the most part it reads like any other teenage story... until you get to the R-rated parts.

Nothing deep, but a really fun read, and I'd easily recommend it to everyone.
 
Oct 27, 2012
9,582
1
390


Pulp Friction is a collection of erotic stories written in the '50s and '60s; Call Me By Your Name is more contemporary, although set in the '70s and '80s, and is an absolutely wonderful book that also happens to have a number of very sensual sections.
Thank you!! That's exactly what I was looking for.
 
Mar 21, 2010
9,093
0
600
Austin, TX
Wow, this was a really sad read :/ I'm so sorry about this. People like this absolutely suck. Was this on Grindr? It just sorta confirms why I deleted the app about a year ago :S. I couldn't handle being called fat anymore X_X
Yeah it was on Grindr and I think Jack'd? And sorry to hear that too. There's shitty people everywhere sadly, it's just sad to see people so obviously insecure with themselves try to take down people who have their shit together. I hope you didn't take attacks like that too personally, coz they didn't earn that from you. :)
 
Dec 23, 2013
6,326
0
0
Vancouver
Yeah it was on Grindr and I think Jack'd? And sorry to hear that too. There's shitty people everywhere sadly, it's just sad to see people so obviously insecure with themselves try to take down people who have their shit together. I hope you didn't take attacks like that too personally, coz they didn't earn that from you. :)
I'm glad to at least hear that it doesn't seem like your feelings weren't too affected/hurt by those messages :). You're just handsome in general! So don't let ignorance bring you down <3.

Aw thank you.. :) I will admit, sometimes it's hard to not take it personally :(. I do try my best not to, of course! But sometimes I get vulnerable, I suppose X_X haha!
 
Oct 27, 2012
9,582
1
390
Wow, this was a really sad read :/ I'm so sorry about this. People like this absolutely suck. Was this on Grindr? It just sorta confirms why I deleted the app about a year ago :S. I couldn't handle being called fat anymore X_X
What? You're not fat >.>

You're super ultra cute!! <3

Seconding Mr_Zombie's suggestion for the OP.



Maus is a classic and definitely one of my favorite books in general. You'll love it, I'm sure.

As for book suggestions, here's one which is LGBT-themed, but aimed at all audiences. I absolutely loved it, and so will anyone who decides to read it.





Here's one.



It's a coming-of-age story with elements of gay erotica. For the most part it reads like any other teenage story... until you get to the R-rated parts.

Nothing deep, but a really fun read, and I'd easily recommend it to everyone.
Thanks for the suggestions! Now I have four books to read, 46 down to go. If anyone else has any suggestions I would appreciate it. Any books with LGBT themes that you guys have read or heard about.
 
Dec 23, 2013
6,326
0
0
Vancouver
Oh, I didn't notice you were back BlueBadger! Nice to see you back! Looking quite handsome in that pic, by the way.
Kaiser!! Aww! It's so good to see you too!! How are you doing? <3

Aww shucks.. :') Thank you! You're looking quite amazing as well! :3

What? You're not fat >.>

You're super ultra cute!! <3
Aww.. Wow. Thank you so much for the kind words :) <3

Some dudes in the community have some pretty unreal standards, methinks.. But I think that underneath their 6 pack, there's not much of a soul/personality there :p.. So i just try to remind myself of that every time.

It does get difficult, though..
 
Status
Not open for further replies.