Live on a £1 a day ($1.50)

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#4
I've started to do this in a small way (for now).

Buying things like ASDA value teabags are like 29p compared to the much higher priced branded stuff.

I draw the line at very low priced meat though. I could be eating horse.
 
#5
I've started to do this in a small way (for now).

Buying things like ASDA value teabags are like 29p compared to the much higher priced branded stuff.

I draw the line at very low priced meat though. I could be eating horse.
Sometimes it's just brand snobbery a lot the time. If there is a quality difference, it's not a massive one.
 

CorrisD

badchoiceboobies
#6
I could easily survive on 13-15p noodles for a few days and just buy a few per day, I really only eat one proper meal a day as it goes along with a piece of toast and some coffee in the morning, but then I really don't think I eat properly anyway, lol.

Also opening the page I expected them to actually be living on £1 a day and only that £1, not that they worked out 5 days worth of food with £5 ahead of time, obviously that is more realistic but I wanted to see how they survived with just £1 per actual day in the real world, because obviously you can't buy 1/4 a tin of chopped tomatoes for one meal.
 
#8
It annoys me that the recipes use 1/4 of a single courgette or pepper in a pack of 6.
Also 4tbsp of 500g yoghurt...

Maybe it makes sense for a large family, but its skewing the prices imho.
 
#10
I've started to do this in a small way (for now).

Buying things like ASDA value teabags are like 29p compared to the much higher priced branded stuff.

I draw the line at very low priced meat though. I could be eating horse.
Are those tea bags not weak as fuck? Support a local company and get buying Punjana :p

Yeah low priced meat is something I'd avoid if it's red meat. Cheap chicken breasts are fine but Asda Basics/Tesco Value mince, ugh.

This is how I feel for most products.

Some value range biscuits are indistinguishable from their considerably higher priced competition, for example.
Aye stuff like fruit, veg, cereal, biscuits etc. are practically the same.
 

CorrisD

badchoiceboobies
#13
Depends where you live. Could have a lot of supermarkets nearby and could just walk to them all.
Yea, I don't see that as a problem, there's a Tesco and a Sainsburys just a small walk away from here, a walk between them shorter still, in the other direction a Morrisons and Asda the same, and that is just the big stores rather than the tiny versions of any or smaller independent or chain off-licenses.
 
#14
Its much more doable if you have the collateral to buy things in reasonable bulk which given the ingredients suggested point towards that. Unless you're telling me there is some place where I can buy one slice of bread...

Its ironic how a lot of it is fresh food given how people grumble about how expensive fresh food it.

Also you have to pretty much forget meat.
 
#17
London student here. Tried doing something similar last month, wherein I tried to limit my monthly spending average to £10/day. Was hard a hell, seeing as I'm not very proficient with cooking, and ended up winning this personal challenge of mine by a meagre 41p difference.

Bottom line: London is one expensive city, as far as food goes.
 
#18
Its much more doable if you have the collateral to buy things in reasonable bulk which given the ingredients suggested point towards that. Unless you're telling me there is some place where I can buy one slice of bread...

Its ironic how a lot of it is fresh food given how people grumble about how expensive fresh food it.

Also you have to pretty much forget meat.
Some butchers have lots of leftovers from prime cuts.
 
#20
I recommend that people look in the marked down section in supermarkets especially if you're just going to be picking up something for the dinner. Some right bargains in there, although you need to be there at the right time.

Bread is also a good buy at cheaper prices as long as it's not white. That just tastes rank. Our house goes through things like tea/bread really quickly so the saving add up in no time at all.

Are those tea bags not weak as fuck? Support a local company and get buying Punjana :p

Yeah low priced meat is something I'd avoid if it's red meat. Cheap chicken breasts are fine but Asda Basics/Tesco Value mince, ugh.



Aye stuff like fruit, veg, cereal, biscuits etc. are practically the same.
It's something you get used to! Once you're committed to only spending a tiny amount on food you look at the things you used to buy before in disgust, even though they may taste better.

But yeah, I miss some luxuries like Punjana :p. £1.89 for a small packet though? Not a chance.
 
#22
It's something you get used to! Once you're committed to only spending a tiny amount on food you look at the things you used to buy before in disgust, even though they may taste better.

But yeah, I miss some luxuries like Punjana :p. £1.89 for a small packet though? Not a chance.
I'll lend you a bag.
 
#23
Given that the article itself notes that the author apparently ended up way below his needed daily caloric intake, this isn't exactly a sustainable lifestyle. It is a pretty nifty experiment, though.
 
#24
isn't this a pretty dangerous road to go down, considering how awful some of the ultra-cheap own-brand stuff can be?
You just need to buy carefully. I don't think I would ever go full "own-brand", but it's definitely a great way to get your bills down in a noticeable way. It's something you get better at as you go, learning what to buy and what not to buy.

You do feel a bit like a leper with a basket full of the stuff at the self service checkout though. I wish they would use less offensive packaging.
 
#25
I recommend that people look in the marked down section in supermarkets especially if you're just going to be picking up something for the dinner. Some right bargains in there, although you need to be there at the right time.
That wouldn't work with the plan set out in the article because they are buying things in bulk which takes a lot of pre planning. I think it's a bit of a cop out tbh
 
#26
You just need to buy carefully. I don't think I would ever go full "own-brand", but it's definitely a great way to get your bills down in a noticeable way. It's something you get better at as you go, learning what to buy and what not to buy.

You do feel a bit like a leper with a basket full of the stuff at the self service checkout though. I wish they would use less offensive packaging.
Tesco Everyday Value doesn't look too bad after the rebrand.
 
#27
That wouldn't work with the plan set out in the article because they are buying things in bulk which takes a lot of pre planning. I think it's a bit of a cop out tbh
Yeah it definitely wouldn't fit on the £1 plan, but it's a great way to save money if you're only popping in to buy something for dinner. Plus they put nice stuff in there as well.

Nothing you could rely on though.
Tesco Everyday Value doesn't look too bad after the rebrand.
Used to be hideously bad, but now it's much better. Asda's "smart price" range is still pretty bad though.

The hideous green and white easily sticks out. The pangs of guilt when someone looks at what you're buying :/.
 
#28
I meant the article is a cop out by the way, like they bill pasta and yogurt at 3p from £1 packs. And the shelf life on some stuff isn't good enough for you to be able to do that if you're just feeding yourself. 2.5kg of potatoes for just half a single one, they are bending the maths.
 
#29
I feel like there are better ways to save money than this. Stuff like the cost of commuting, eating/going out, drinking/smoking, etc.

It's the food in your home. Unless all you buy is high end stuff or luxury stuff like Innocent smoothies or pure pomegranate juice, you shouldn't be going broke from it. If you are, food isn't the issue, you need to look at other shit in your life.
 
#30
That wouldn't work with the plan set out in the article because they are buying things in bulk which takes a lot of pre planning. I think it's a bit of a cop out tbh
Yeah, that's what I don't get. They're not spending £1 a day because - as they admitted - you can't get things that cheap without buying in bulk.

I can't exactly walk into the shop and buy 1/4th of a red pepper.
 
#31
Are those tea bags not weak as fuck? Support a local company and get buying Punjana :p

Yeah low priced meat is something I'd avoid if it's red meat. Cheap chicken breasts are fine but Asda Basics/Tesco Value mince, ugh.



Aye stuff like fruit, veg, cereal, biscuits etc. are practically the same.
Tesco value mince is absolutely fine and its slightly higher fat content makes it absolutely perfect for making your own burgers
 
#33
Tesco value mince is absolutely fine and its slightly higher fat content makes it absolutely perfect for making your own burgers
Are you mental? Value mince is bloody terrible. You could swim in the amount of fat that comes out of them.

That reminds me, today I noticed my local butcher has suddenly attracted a large customer base. I wonder if the horse meat scandal was orchestrated by a cabal of butchers.
 
#36
Yeah it definitely wouldn't fit on the £1 plan, but it's a great way to save money if you're only popping in to buy something for dinner. Plus they put nice stuff in there as well.

Nothing you could rely on though.

Used to be hideously bad, but now it's much better. Asda's "smart price" range is still pretty bad though.

The hideous green and white easily sticks out. The pangs of guilt when someone looks at what you're buying :/.
Yeah out of the big three value ranges Tesco is by far the nicest to look at and the least cheap looking







Tesco value mince is absolutely fine and its slightly higher fat content makes it absolutely perfect for making your own burgers
I'll take your word for it.
 
#39
She kinda circumvent the problem of essential items often costing more than £1, by calculating the portion cost of food. I stuck to £10 a week, but that included any basics I might have run out of such as butter (that alone will cost you £1+), flour, pasta, and more.

I meant the article is a cop out by the way, like they bill pasta and yogurt at 3p from £1 packs. And the shelf life on some stuff isn't good enough for you to be able to do that if you're just feeding yourself. 2.5kg of potatoes for just half a single one, they are bending the maths.
Precisely.
 
#49
When I was in my teenage years we would sometimes get Tesco value vodka because we had no money, and Smirnoff and other brands are expensive as fuck, even now.

One of the worst drinks I've ever had, even mixed.
 
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