Minorities Who ‘Whiten’ Résumés More Likely to Get Interview

#56
The sad part of this is people will yell and scream "actually it's a meritocracy" after seeing this but strangely enough whenever an industry goes to blind resume/audition setups, suddenly more PoC and women get hired.
 
#61
Some employers don't like non whites, but there is no hiding it at the interview so if not being white is enough to reject you what does the temporary ruse gain you? They just reject you later rather than sooner?
 
#63
Some employers don't like non whites, but there is no hiding it at the interview so if not being white is enough to reject you what does the temporary ruse gain you? They just reject you later rather than sooner?
A lot of minorities don't even get to the interview phase just by their name getting the resume sent to the trash.
 
#64
Some employers don't like non whites, but there is no hiding it at the interview so if not being white is enough to reject you what does the temporary ruse gain you? They just reject you later rather than sooner?
It's a foot in the door. It's a chance to show them that you're more qualified than other candidates.
 
#65
Some employers don't like non whites, but there is no hiding it at the interview so if not being white is enough to reject you what does the temporary ruse gain you? They just reject you later rather than sooner?
It gives you a chance to showcase your other attributes as well, as opposed to just being tossed aside due to your name.
Yes, if someone isn't going to hire you because of race, they're not going to hire you. But in some cases it's "getting past the first gate," essentially.


Alright, but what if even that isn't white enough? Mine isn't, for instance. None of my names are. People of my race also don't tend to have "American" names.
Invent a nickname?
 
#67
Man GAF sure loves to generalize eh.

It might be because I went to school in western Toronto but I've known about this phenomenon for years. It's not as bad where I'm from because a good chunk of people doing the hiring aren't Caucasian, but it's known and it's definitely a thing.

On top of this, having to explain to (white) friends that naming their child Royal or Angel might not look great on future resumes got a surprising amount of flak.

Sorry man, you think your kid with a stripper name is going to get looked at twice for that office job? Gimme a break
If this was common knowledge, we wouldn't need studies backing it up now would we? If you personally get it, that's good. The general populous is either unaware or likes to pretend it doesn't exist. Then again, it could be an area specific thing where some places are flat out better about knowing that shit than others.
 
#68
It's why I gave my son the simplest, least black name.

Emoyers will see "Lamar" or "Teshaun" and think "mmmmhmmmm I know enough about you already".

It's why I'm happy my parents did the same with me.

Employers are routinely and genuinely surprised to see me when I arrive in person after seeing my resume and hearing me speak on the phone.

That's why some Chinese have English names.

I know a girl who's English name is "Kelly".
Same.

In high school and college I literally knew groups of Asian kids who just decided it's better to be called "Albert or "Steve" instead of "Hing" or " Peng".

Never really understood at the time.
 
#69
It's why I gave my son the simplest, least black name.

Emoyers will see "Lamar" or "Teshaun" and think "mmmmhmmmm I know enough about you already".

It's why I'm happy my parents did the same with me.

Employers are routinely and genuinely surprised to see me when I arrive in person after seeing my resume and hearing me speak on the phone.
Oh, hey Steve.
 
#76
Alright, but what if even that isn't white enough? Mine isn't, for instance. None of my names are. People of my race also don't tend to have "American" names.
Then it's kind of a dice roll at that point. Being able to use a different name or reorganize it is extremely helpful but if none of the names work then casting your net as wide as possible is the next step. Or get a legal name change with a name added at the very least. It would be worth it.
 
#77
I assume they do the same as everyone else, put a white as fuck name on the resume.
That works for first names (I go by an English first name anyway, and so does), but I don't think I could put a white last name without eventually raising eyebrows once they put two and two together and realize that my last name isn't actually Leblanc.
 
#79
Some employers don't like non whites, but there is no hiding it at the interview so if not being white is enough to reject you what does the temporary ruse gain you? They just reject you later rather than sooner?
Because that's not how racial bias works.

A lot of white people are subconsciously prejudice and highly judgemental of minorities, and when doing something repetitive and critcal, like going through résumés, it surfaces. Unless they are just straight racist, often getting in front of them and showing them you're just like everyone else is half the battle.
 
#80
Because that's not how racial bias works.

A lot of white people are subconsciously prejudice and highly judgemental of minorities, and when doing something repetitive and critcal, like going through résumés, it surfaces. Unless they are just straight racist, often getting in front of them and showing them you're just like everyone else is half the battle.
.

And this is proven by data.
 
#82
That works for first names (I go by an English first name anyway, and so does), but I don't think I could put a white last name without eventually raising eyebrows once they put two and two together and realize that my last name isn't actually Leblanc.
I was talking to a friend about this a couple weeks ago, I wondered what the Judge would say if I told him i wanted to legally change my name to get more job interviews.
 
#83
When I was first starting out I changed my first name to something more white in the resume and fielded much more calls lol. When I went in and got the job I just told them what was in the resume was just a nickname for me or it was just short for my full name. At that point my foot was in the door and already made an impression, so they didn't do anything.
 
#85
I'm sure glad having an Irish name isn't a thing anymore. Heard some stories from my grandparents.
Mind elaborating? I guess I have an Irish surname but I don't think it comes up much... I guess you're thinking first name?

edit: hm, did some googling. apparently my surname is an anglicized version of an irish surname.... interesting.
 
#86
What if your first name also isnt white?
Use an american first name. Asian-Americans have been doing this for decades cus our parents know what's up.

Takei Hosato -> George Takei
Jo Mo-ran -> Margaret Cho
Shu-How Lin -> Jeremy Lin
Jeong Gangjo -> Ken Jeong
Guān Yǐngshān -> Michelle Kwan

Some people keep it like Ang Lee and Chow Yun-fat.
 

Switch Back 9

a lot of my threads involve me fucking up somehow. Perhaps I'm a moron?
#87
Mind elaborating? I guess I have an Irish surname but I don't think it comes up much... I guess you're thinking first name?

edit: hm, did some googling. apparently my surname is an anglicized version of an irish surname.... interesting.
Back in the day being Irish was enough to straight up bar you from a job or entering certain establishments. Not on the same level as being black obviously, but there was huge amounts of prejudice.
 

Kanik

Sonic handles my blue balls
#89
Use an american first name. Asian-Americans have been doing this for decades cus our parents know what's up.

Takei Hosato -> George Takei
Jo Mo-ran -> Margaret Cho
Shu-How Lin -> Jeremy Lin
Jeong Gangjo -> Ken Jeong
Guān Yǐngshān -> Michelle Kwan

Some people keep it like Ang Lee and Chow Yun-fat.
I've known three Asian women who have worked in my office that chose the name "Rachel"...because of the show Friends.
 
#92
Some employers don't like non whites, but there is no hiding it at the interview so if not being white is enough to reject you what does the temporary ruse gain you? They just reject you later rather than sooner?
It keeps your resume from going straight in the trash after first looking at it.

Even some dude on here said he doesn't call people for interviews if the name is hard to pronounce.
 

Agent Icebeezy

Welcome beautful toddler, Madison Elizabeth, to the horde!
#93
Black guy here, normal last name, first name is Greek in origin. I should go to my nickname of Ricky, that's pretty much says Americana. I'll take thoughts on this.
 
#95
Then it's kind of a dice roll at that point. Being able to use a different name or reorganize it is extremely helpful but if none of the names work then casting your net as wide as possible is the next step. Or get a legal name change with a name added at the very least. It would be worth it.
My name is:

[Arabic] [Arabic] [Arabic, Turkish variant spelling].

You aren't wrong, a legal name change would probably result in more call backs. That's something I can worry about come graduation if my network doesn't help me out on that front. That being said, I don't think I ever would legally change my name. Unless it was impossible for me to find a job, I wouldn't even consider a name change. I guess I liken it to my identity.

An above posters suggestion of using a nickname, I could probably do. I guess.

I haven't had any real trouble finding jobs, but all of my employers have been minorities themselves. I imagine outside of my area, I'd suffer a lot more.
Toronto's largely South Asian, and as a result of that largely Muslim, so a lot of people have names like mine
.
 
#96
Duh. My entire family has a "white voice". My elder sister used her middle name on resumes.

The utter SHOCK when I met someone in person. LMFAO. Lord, the didn't know what to do with themselves.
 
#97
Black and born and raised in Mississippi, but you better believe that when I get on the phone to dispute a bill or buy/negotiate for a hot item on Craigslist, my voice goes straight to Europe.

It annoyed me earlier in life when people would ask where I'm from, meaning not from the US, but now as an adult, it's an advantage. That shit gets results.
 
#98
tons of people will blame you for what your parents named you lol. It's crazy.

I fortunately (for my sake) have an anglo first name and unique (but not foreign or ethnic) last name. I've also mastered the white voice on the phone.

in regards to Asian folk having americanized names, it's also because they'll come here for work and they get tired of having to pronounce their name or having people mispronounce their name at work.

You should always attempt to say someone's name correctly if that is what they prefer to be called. I hate the idea that white people can't be bothered to manage pronunciations so the rest of us have to acclimate to them.
 
Use an american first name. Asian-Americans have been doing this for decades cus our parents know what's up.

Takei Hosato -> George Takei
Jo Mo-ran -> Margaret Cho
Shu-How Lin -> Jeremy Lin
Jeong Gangjo -> Ken Jeong
Guān Yǐngshān -> Michelle Kwan

Some people keep it like Ang Lee and Chow Yun-fat.
I work at a college and many of our Chinese students will adopt American names. I don't mind since it's ultimately their call, but I always hope that they aren't doing it to accommodate the teachers/administration.

I'm Nigerian and I could imagine the verbal beatdown I'd get if I'd ever approached my dad about adopting a western name at school.