NeoGAF Camera Equipment Thread | MK II

Rentahamster

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While the D850 is certainly an amazing DSLR, DxOMark and their tests are just a bunch of nonsense.
They have some utility in terms of raw stats, but yes, a camera is much much more than just its sensor and signal processing firmware.

Personally, I only really pay attention to the dynamic range scores.
 

Chiaroscuro

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I just checked and personally I'd rather have a 100% OVF over a touch screen and an increased fps of... .5 frames...that's nothing. And yes the 80D is a great camera as well. If he wants to go full frame that's fine since it's within his budget. I personally bounce around between full frame and crop without caring too much these days. There's only a difference in image quality when you start hitting iso 1600 and above. Flipscreens and touchscreens don't impress me too much. I go crazy enough just cleaning my XT2 screen, I don't want to dirty them up more than it already does. I can adjust my screen and for the most part I really don't. Dual Pixel AF is only important if you do video, which it sounds like he doesn't. The MP difference isn't super severe either. You can still get good images out of a D3 in this day and age and that's 12MP, it's really just all about knowing what you're doing...unless you have to crop the bejesus out of it.
You understand how difficult to me is to choose the right camera. I just want to be better at photography no profissional goal in mind at the moment (while I do not discard that in the future) and just studiying a lot to be able to be that. Currently I am struggling as an artist (mainly watercolor and ink) where I use a lot of photo references to do my art (so that is why photography came in place). Truly speaking I should wait a little more to find the limitations of my current camera T2i camera (although I am already feeling some of those) to start making new purchases. However I have the oportunity to buy from US this month (friend travelling) which will save me a lot of money than buying locally. But of course that oportunity will show up again in the future too. So it is a kind of rushed decision, and everyone has a different opinion based on his own experiences (which will probably different than mine). Yes, I am torn to decide if I should spend a lot of money (which does not come easy) into a 5Dmkiii kit or go cheaper with the original 6D (I think the mkii is out of the equation now) or even stay with a better croped APS.
 

JadedWriter

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You understand how difficult to me is to choose the right camera. I just want to be better at photography no profissional goal in mind at the moment (while I do not discard that in the future) and just studiying a lot to be able to be that. Currently I am struggling as an artist (mainly watercolor and ink) where I use a lot of photo references to do my art (so that is why photography came in place). Truly speaking I should wait a little more to find the limitations of my current camera T2i camera (although I am already feeling some of those) to start making new purchases. However I have the oportunity to buy from US this month (friend travelling) which will save me a lot of money than buying locally. But of course that oportunity will show up again in the future too. So it is a kind of rushed decision, and everyone has a different opinion based on his own experiences (which will probably different than mine). Yes, I am torn to decide if I should spend a lot of money (which does not come easy) into a 5Dmkiii kit or go cheaper with the original 6D (I think the mkii is out of the equation now) or even stay with a better croped APS.
It all depends on what you feel comfortable doing. I started taking pics during dates with my ex and branched off into street photography and I do event's and model shoots as well. All depends on what you want to do. I've done all of this on crop and full frame.
 

Rentahamster

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Yes, I am torn to decide if I should spend a lot of money (which does not come easy) into a 5Dmkiii kit or go cheaper with the original 6D (I think the mkii is out of the equation now) or even stay with a better croped APS.
IMO, knowledge is better than a new camera. Cheaper, too. Are you sure you've maxed out learning on a T2i? Why not invest in lenses instead, as those last longer than camera bodies?
 

JadedWriter

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IMO, knowledge is better than a new camera. Cheaper, too. Are you sure you've maxed out learning on a T2i? Why not invest in lenses instead, as those last longer than camera bodies?
Going out and shooting more...and reading does a good job of teaching you what you want to do and what you need/lack/need to learn.
 

Ty4on

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While the D850 is certainly an amazing DSLR, DxOMark and their tests are just a bunch of nonsense.
It's better than reviewers that are constantly saying ISO perf is a stop better because they made the noise reduction more aggressive.
 

Subpar Scrub

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Hey, I have a Nikon D5500 and was wondering if anyone has used the Nikon 35mm f1.8 lens? I think it’s the DX series. I want a decent, but somewhat budget lens for low lighting such as night concerts. My shortest lens, the 50mm with an aperture range of 4-6.4ish, can’t do the job unless I crank the ISO and drop the shutter speed to the point where there’s blur or distortion.
 

Jzero

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Yes, I am torn to decide if I should spend a lot of money (which does not come easy) into a 5Dmkiii kit or go cheaper with the original 6D (I think the mkii is out of the equation now) or even stay with a better croped APS.
I think the things that make the most difference are lighting, composition, the right lens, and post-processing . Honestly the bodies don't make that much of a difference.
 

gruenel

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Hey, I have a Nikon D5500 and was wondering if anyone has used the Nikon 35mm f1.8 lens? I think it’s the DX series. I want a decent, but somewhat budget lens for low lighting such as night concerts. My shortest lens, the 50mm with an aperture range of 4-6.4ish, can’t do the job unless I crank the ISO and drop the shutter speed to the point where there’s blur or distortion.
I have a D5200 and the Nikkor 35mm f1.8. It‘s my favorite lens, very sharp even at 1.8, beautiful bokeh. However I use it mostly for portraits at daytime lighting. While you can‘t expect wonders from a DX camera in low light situations, it will certainly be a huge step up from an f4 lens. And considering it‘s quite cheap I‘d say go for it.
 

Timedog

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Should I get a Canon 80d or a used 5d mark ii?

I mostly just want that video continuous autofocus on the 80d. But I like most everything else on the 5d. It's for both video and stills. I almost want to get both but that's insane.

Also, why is dxomark bad? Mind you I look at the graphs, not just the single number rating.
 

Subpar Scrub

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I have a D5200 and the Nikkor 35mm f1.8. It‘s my favorite lens, very sharp even at 1.8, beautiful bokeh. However I use it mostly for portraits at daytime lighting. While you can‘t expect wonders from a DX camera in low light situations, it will certainly be a huge step up from an f4 lens. And considering it‘s quite cheap I‘d say go for it.
Cheers for the advice!
 

snaffles

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You understand how difficult to me is to choose the right camera. I just want to be better at photography no profissional goal in mind at the moment (while I do not discard that in the future) and just studiying a lot to be able to be that. Currently I am struggling as an artist (mainly watercolor and ink) where I use a lot of photo references to do my art (so that is why photography came in place). Truly speaking I should wait a little more to find the limitations of my current camera T2i camera (although I am already feeling some of those) to start making new purchases. However I have the oportunity to buy from US this month (friend travelling) which will save me a lot of money than buying locally. But of course that oportunity will show up again in the future too. So it is a kind of rushed decision, and everyone has a different opinion based on his own experiences (which will probably different than mine). Yes, I am torn to decide if I should spend a lot of money (which does not come easy) into a 5Dmkiii kit or go cheaper with the original 6D (I think the mkii is out of the equation now) or even stay with a better croped APS.
Basically it sounds like you are wasting your money. Learn how to use what you have and figure out what you want in a new camera. Everyone here telling you what they prefer serves no purpose when none of us really know what you are going to use it for.
 

JadedWriter

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Basically it sounds like you are wasting your money. Learn how to use what you have and figure out what you want in a new camera. Everyone here telling you what they prefer serves no purpose when none of us really know what you are going to use it for.
This is true. I don't really know what he photographs and it sounds like he needs to get his photography legs a little bit.
 

RuGalz

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Also, why is dxomark bad? Mind you I look at the graphs, not just the single number rating.
It's only bad because a lot people look at single score which is just a very poor way to compare different cameras using their data. They don't exactly try to educate people that well either imo.
 

Zefah

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They are absolutely useless for lenses and the overall scores they assign are completely arbitrary. They pretend like they are doing objective quality analysis, but the things people value in camera imaging are different and largely subjective.

Anyway, Chiaroscuro, you really need to let people know what you are planning to shoot. A T2i would probably be fine for a while assuming you are shooting stationary objects or scenes and have control over the light.
 

Chiaroscuro

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Anyway, Chiaroscuro, you really need to let people know what you are planning to shoot. A T2i would probably be fine for a while assuming you are shooting stationary objects or scenes and have control over the light.
Keep in mind that I am a begginer. Coming from other art fields to photography (so I have a good sense of composition, but lack tecnichal skills).

Thing is currently I shot stationary and archicteture, which I understand I am fine with my equipment (despite needing better angular lens). Maybe doing more street shooting, where a good focus equipment may come in hand I guess.

I am also taking classes where I notice that for fast moving scenes the camera limits me (of course I will probably never do sports photography but want to cover the basics in every area). Portraits are another area of interest, will be attenting specific courses soon (guessing technic is more important here too).

But if I want to start going deeper in photography here and try to squeeze money from it I eventually will have to make events gigs (like parties/ weddings) because that is the easiest path (not that I want it, I am more in the art side, but I have to survive). Lousy planning, I know, I am still to green to decide wisely anything, bu5 th3 opportunity to get an equipment half the price (or even less) than it costs here presented to me right now.
 

Zefah

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As long as you don't need to shoot sports, any modern mirrorless camera should have a pretty decent autofocus tracking system with good coverage of the frame to take pictures of moving subjects.

I would recommend looking into an APS-C mirrorless camera from Sony or Fujifilm. Both are really good systems with tons of great technology packed into the cameras. I vastly prefer mirrorless, especially for beginners, since they let you see the effect your settings will have on the exposure in real time before you even take the photo. For me at least, this helped me learn how ISO, aperture, and shutter speed can affect the brightness of an image and allowed me to quickly transition to shooting manually after always being stuck in auto and never understanding how anything worked. They also allow you to shoot with the back screen LCD without any lag in situations where you can't or don't want to use the viewfinder.

That's my recommendation at least!
 

JadedWriter

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Keep in mind that I am a begginer. Coming from other art fields to photography (so I have a good sense of composition, but lack tecnichal skills).

Thing is currently I shot stationary and archicteture, which I understand I am fine with my equipment (despite needing better angular lens). Maybe doing more street shooting, where a good focus equipment may come in hand I guess.

I am also taking classes where I notice that for fast moving scenes the camera limits me (of course I will probably never do sports photography but want to cover the basics in every area). Portraits are another area of interest, will be attenting specific courses soon (guessing technic is more important here too).

But if I want to start going deeper in photography here and try to squeeze money from it I eventually will have to make events gigs (like parties/ weddings) because that is the easiest path (not that I want it, I am more in the art side, but I have to survive). Lousy planning, I know, I am still to green to decide wisely anything, bu5 th3 opportunity to get an equipment half the price (or even less) than it costs here presented to me right now.
Just do more architecture stuff and then slowly experiment with street photography. I switch back and forth between crop and full frame for street and portraits, really just depends on what I have on hand these days. Now for low light indoor events that's full frame territory period.
 

RuGalz

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Save your money and buy camera body later. People can do street photography with manual focus lens. A lot of it is good observation, anticipation and zone focusing. If you are limited by high ISO performance, explore B&W photography. There are many options and it sounds like you are just rushing to buy something. Lenses on the other hand maybe something you can consider exploring imo.
 
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The T2i is a lot more camera than the equipment I learned on, a FM2 (fully mechanical/manual). I had three choices of ISO (100, 400, 800) and a center-weighted light meter.

With that camera I did everything from architecture to street photography, indoors and outdoors, product photography and even shot sports and fashion.

You don't need a new camera. If anything, you can use new glass - glass you'll keep when and if you upgrade your body.
 

Zefah

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Everyone is different. I understand you guys are recommending against him spending money until he knows what he is doing, and cautioning against acquiring new shiny gear just for the sake of having something new is smart, but there is something to be said for having confidence and feeling good about your gear. If you are constantly feeling limited by your camera or unsatisfied with it, then it's unlikely you'll feel motivated to get out and shoot. I think it's important that whichever camera you decide upon, it should excite you and make you want to get up and go take some pictures whenever you look at it. If you're current camera isn't doing that for you, then you should find one that does.
 

Timedog

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Get the 80D if you need something modern.

Get the used 5D if you need Full Frame (on the cheap) above all else.
I kind of need both but don't have money for a 5d mark iv. I'm thinking about getting both (which will allow multiple camera angles, and my gf and I can shoot stills together) and then upgrade the full frame a few years from now when I can get something used that's good for video. But if I buy one, I can use the remaining money for an L lens.

Decisions...
 

JadedWriter

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I kind of need both but don't have money for a 5d mark iv. I'm thinking about getting both (which will allow multiple camera angles, and my gf and I can shoot stills together) and then upgrade the full frame a few years from now when I can get something used that's good for video. But if I buy one, I can use the remaining money for an L lens.

Decisions...
You should probably get the 80D first and get a good lens for video and photography work. If you can squeeze a Sigma 18-35 into your budget that should be fine for both. My only complaints with that lens is the AF. Rock that for a year or two and then after that see how the used market is for the 5DMkiii.
 

Timedog

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You should probably get the 80D first and get a good lens for video and photography work. If you can squeeze a Sigma 18-35 into your budget that should be fine for both. My only complaints with that lens is the AF. Rock that for a year or two and then after that see how the used market is for the 5DMkiii.
The Mark III doesn't have video autofocus, so it can't really replace the 80D.

Or do you mean get the 5D Mark III in a few years, but also keep the 80D? Yeah that might be a good idea if the Mark III is way better than the Mark II.
 

Astral/H3X

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Honestly street photography seems particularly well suited to black and white, and I'm not really sure why it isn't more widespread.

Night street photography is much more acceptable in b/w since noise is a much lesser concern in that regard, and the harsh lighting of a sunny day creates contrast that looks great in black and white (as long as you're fine punching the contrast a bit further on top of that).
 

JadedWriter

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The Mark III doesn't have video autofocus, so it can't really replace the 80D.

Or do you mean get the 5D Mark III in a few years, but also keep the 80D? Yeah that might be a good idea if the Mark III is way better than the Mark II.
Yes keep the 80D for video. I have an XT2 and that's not replacing my D810 and vice versa. I pretty much love both cameras equally.
Honestly street photography seems particularly well suited to black and white, and I'm not really sure why it isn't more widespread.

Night street photography is much more acceptable in b/w since noise is a much lesser concern in that regard, and the harsh lighting of a sunny day creates contrast that looks great in black and white (as long as you're fine punching the contrast a bit further on top of that).
I like a bit of both color and B&W. If a shot is monotone as hell or there are a lot of nice shadows at play B&W is great, though I tend to do a set of both for a picture if I can. If the color doesn't add anything or is just too distracting I'll just B&W it, but I do get tired of seeing an instagram feed of 100% B&W.
 
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Honestly street photography seems particularly well suited to black and white, and I'm not really sure why it isn't more widespread.

Night street photography is much more acceptable in b/w since noise is a much lesser concern in that regard, and the harsh lighting of a sunny day creates contrast that looks great in black and white (as long as you're fine punching the contrast a bit further on top of that).
Cartier-Bresson and Capa would agree with you :D Street has a pretty long history and tradition of being shot in B&W, actually and, to be honest, of all styles of photography I follow, street is probably the one where I see employed most often.
 

Timedog

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Yes keep the 80D for video. I have an XT2 and that's not replacing my D810 and vice versa. I pretty much love both cameras equally.
Makes sense. Also, that sigma lens looks very cool, but it's aps-c only? If I wanted an aps-c only zoom, I was thinking about: https://www.amazon.com/Canon-EF-S-17-55mm-Lens-Cameras/dp/B000EW8074.

On a full frame I might just go with the canon because of it's increased flexibility, but with lowlight being a sore spot on APS-C sensors(and the thing I hate most about my current camera), that Sigma is looking prettttttty good.
 

JadedWriter

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Makes sense. Also, that sigma lens looks very cool, but it's aps-c only? If I wanted an aps-c only zoom, I was thinking about: https://www.amazon.com/Canon-EF-S-17-55mm-Lens-Cameras/dp/B000EW8074.

On a full frame I might just go with the canon because of it's increased flexibility, but with lowlight being a sore spot on APS-C sensors(and the thing I hate most about my current camera), that Sigma is looking prettttttty good.
There's a lot that can be said about gaining an extra stop of light, mind you the AF on that Canon is probably a lot more accurate, but the Sigma I think is cheaper and is pretty much a youtubers standard lens these days for video work. If the Canon you linked is full frame compatible...which I highly doubt it is given the starting focal length get it, though I ran around with an 18-35 and 17-50 at one point, but if I had to get one...I'm honestly not sure. If the AF is accurate on the copy you get the 18-35 is a good lens.
 

japtor

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Re: beginner looking into a new camera, I’d agree with the people saying to learn more before dumping cash on whatever stuff. I feel like for most cameras out there you can get the basics of the technical aspects down and you can get great pictures out of them (albeit lenses being a major x factor there), then once you better understand that stuff and what you like you can better shop for a body that meets your wants at that point.

Like I think a big issue for me with the lower end stuff isn’t so much quality and a lot of the fancier features, it’s just like...good quick access to the main basic photo controls (i.e. aperture, shutter, ISO, and I feel like I’m forgetting something). You can control that stuff with most cameras, it’s just more of a pain the lower end you go cause limited controls and/or customizability.
Everyone is different. I understand you guys are recommending against him spending money until he knows what he is doing, and cautioning against acquiring new shiny gear just for the sake of having something new is smart, but there is something to be said for having confidence and feeling good about your gear. If you are constantly feeling limited by your camera or unsatisfied with it, then it's unlikely you'll feel motivated to get out and shoot. I think it's important that whichever camera you decide upon, it should excite you and make you want to get up and go take some pictures whenever you look at it. If you're current camera isn't doing that for you, then you should find one that does.
I can definitely see that side of things, cause yeah, if the motivation to shoot isn’t there it’s a dead end. But I think a big reason to learn is so you know exactly why the current camera doesn’t have that it factor for you. Without that you could easily dump a bunch of money in new gear and just run into some other unforeseen issue that kills the excitement just the same.

But that could just be me, if I hadn’t taken some photo classes years ago I’d hate buying a camera. It’s a pain enough as it is already knowing this stuff, it’d drive me nuts without that knowledge.
 

JadedWriter

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Re: beginner looking into a new camera, I’d agree with the people saying to learn more before dumping cash on whatever stuff. I feel like for most cameras out there you can get the basics of the technical aspects down and you can get great pictures out of them (albeit lenses being a major x factor there), then once you better understand that stuff and what you like you can better shop for a body that meets your wants at that point.

Like I think a big issue for me with the lower end stuff isn’t so much quality and a lot of the fancier features, it’s just like...good quick access to the main basic photo controls (i.e. aperture, shutter, ISO, and I feel like I’m forgetting something). You can control that stuff with most cameras, it’s just more of a pain the lower end you go cause limited controls and/or customizability.

I can definitely see that side of things, cause yeah, if the motivation to shoot isn’t there it’s a dead end. But I think a big reason to learn is so you know exactly why the current camera doesn’t have that it factor for you. Without that you could easily dump a bunch of money in new gear and just run into some other unforeseen issue that kills the excitement just the same.

But that could just be me, if I hadn’t taken some photo classes years ago I’d hate buying a camera. It’s a pain enough as it is already knowing this stuff, it’d drive me nuts without that knowledge.
If a camera doesn't have a dedicated iso button I don't touch it. I'm not joking. I don't want to menu dive for shit. WB I don't care about though. I'm oddly experienced enough to be able to shoot with anything once I know what does what. This goes mainly for DSLRs. Film would drive me crazy.
 

RuGalz

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I'm SICK and TIRED of my cheesy Canon camera strap.

Any suggestions on some cool looking straps?
Not necessarily the coolest looking if you want something fashionable (i.e. hand crafted leather, custom patterns) but otherwise it's hard to beat Peak Design's offering.
 

Ty4on

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Does anybody know of any decent 35mm film scanners? I live in the UK if that helps.
What are you planning on scanning? Family library of negatives or a roll here and there? Is it all 35mm or do you wanna scan bigger films?

What quality do you want? Are these taken with good film and cameras or are they from old point and shoots/disposable?

Any price range? Usually they start at around £250 for a decent dedicated scanner, but if you have a ton of pictures it might be best to get someone else to scan them because it's a pretty time consuming task.


I'm SICK and TIRED of my cheesy Canon camera strap.

Any suggestions on some cool looking straps?
Nikon strap
 

Lasthope106

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I'm SICK and TIRED of my cheesy Canon camera strap.

Any suggestions on some cool looking straps?
I've tried quite a few and this is the one that I found the most comfortable:

Amazon Camera neck strap

Both sides are made of the weaved fabric which is soft. Regular straps have one that is the design and a black one made of canvas material that is rough and irritates my neck, and chafes in if I have a really heavy lens.

However after doing a shoots for a while I'm finding myself hating this type of neck straps. Carrying them with a 70-200 lens puts a lot of stress in the camera body and they are very awkward to use if you need to move around a lot. Here is what I'll be getting this week:

https://www.amazon.com/Altura-Photo-Vintage-Camera-Release/dp/B01GW49ZRG
 

Futureman

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thanks for strap suggestions.

The Peak Design seems cool but I don't use my strap all the time (mainly when I shoot events) so I don't think I really need extra functionality.

It's hard finding straps that don't use leather... seeing some cool ones on Etsy.
 

Astral/H3X

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thanks for strap suggestions.

The Peak Design seems cool but I don't use my strap all the time (mainly when I shoot events) so I don't think I really need extra functionality.
This is literally by far the number one reason to get a peak design strap.
There when you need it, gone when you don't. Instead of taking ten minutes to sit there and fiddle with tiny little straps, you take three seconds to just pop them off. It's freaking glorious.
All the cool ways to wear the strap are just a bonus.
Although I will say that wearing it as a sling is waaaaaaaaaayyyyy better than as a neck strap.
 

Lasthope106

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thanks for strap suggestions.

The Peak Design seems cool but I don't use my strap all the time (mainly when I shoot events) so I don't think I really need extra functionality.

It's hard finding straps that don't use leather... seeing some cool ones on Etsy.
Post the cool ones you find!

Biggest bit is being full frame, so you get to use the full lens, instead of just the center, and the focal lengths make more sense. And while it isn't "important", FF pixel density works out better than same res on APSC in this case.

IBIS gives vintage lenses stabilization.

I'm sure Fuji and M4/3rds have the focus peaking with old lenses, and that's a pretty big one too.

If Fuji made a Full Frame with IBIS I'd probably call Samyang and tell them to convert all my lenses to X mount and jump ship, tbh.
Yeah, I agree. Sony cameras are killing it IMO. I love using mine with my Tokina 90mm Macro with it.
 

captive

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This is literally by far the number one reason to get a peak design strap.
There when you need it, gone when you don't. Instead of taking ten minutes to sit there and fiddle with tiny little straps, you take three seconds to just pop them off. It's freaking glorious.
All the cool ways to wear the strap are just a bonus.
Although I will say that wearing it as a sling is waaaaaaaaaayyyyy better than as a neck strap.
right, this. Their stuff is great.
 

HazySaiyan

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What are you planning on scanning? Family library of negatives or a roll here and there? Is it all 35mm or do you wanna scan bigger films?

What quality do you want? Are these taken with good film and cameras or are they from old point and shoots/disposable?

Any price range? Usually they start at around £250 for a decent dedicated scanner, but if you have a ton of pictures it might be best to get someone else to scan them because it's a pretty time consuming task.
I'm just getting started with film photography so I want to digitise what I take so I can share it online. It doesn't have to be stellar quality, if I want them printed I'll get it done from the original negative.

All 35mm.
 

Astral/H3X

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SOMEWHERE. In Indiana
Sony FE 50 Macro is only $350 on Amazon right now. Anyone use it?
Unless you need it to be "dual purpose" (ie regular shooting in addition to macro), I'd be far more likely to recommend getting a manual focus only macro lens; if you're looking for the 50mm focal length, there are tons of options that can be very cheap. Or, for a more modern option, a little bit more will get you the Laowa 60mm, which goes to 2x magnification, for even closer shots (Though, it will vignette slightly when used for non macro shots).

The Sony 50mm macro doesn't even seem to have OSS, so I see no reason to get one, personally. It's going to be focus by wire, and MF is much, much more important in macro than AF.

Now, if you're getting this in lieu of say a 50 1.8 and it'll be your regular walk around lens, go for it! Seems to be a fairly chunky discount.
 
Jul 18, 2016
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Madrid, Spain
I remember that Lytro thing was supposed to be a big deal. I think it ended up being a dud.
It'll probably end up being a good camera, it's basically a phone's dual camera only super buffed up. It'll also be woefully expensive and have artifacts while being a slow camera.
For some it could be a great tool the same way some people love the Sigma Foveon cameras.
For most, an ILC will still be the answer.

This is one of those "gotcha!" revolutionary products that end up just being a niche.
 

Zefah

Member
Jan 7, 2007
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Sony FE 50 Macro is only $350 on Amazon right now. Anyone use it?
I have it. It's my only macro lens, so I don't really have anything to compare it against, but I quite like it! Definitely let's me get in super close on things and the image quality is quite good on my A7r II. The close-up auto-focus is quite slow, but I usually just manually focused anyway.

Here's someone's review of it I found on Google. For the money, I would say it's a good value.

https://phillipreeve.net/blog/rolling-review-sony-fe-2-850-macro/
 

Rentahamster

Rodent Whores
Jun 26, 2007
35,531
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Best Coast
Going out and shooting more...and reading does a good job of teaching you what you want to do and what you need/lack/need to learn.
Yup, so many beginners get sidetracked by expensive gear, and don't realize that the most important tool is in your head, and it can be leveled up for free at the library or on YouTube.

Keep in mind that I am a begginer. Coming from other art fields to photography (so I have a good sense of composition, but lack tecnichal skills).

Thing is currently I shot stationary and archicteture, which I understand I am fine with my equipment (despite needing better angular lens). Maybe doing more street shooting, where a good focus equipment may come in hand I guess.

I am also taking classes where I notice that for fast moving scenes the camera limits me (of course I will probably never do sports photography but want to cover the basics in every area). Portraits are another area of interest, will be attenting specific courses soon (guessing technic is more important here too).

But if I want to start going deeper in photography here and try to squeeze money from it I eventually will have to make events gigs (like parties/ weddings) because that is the easiest path (not that I want it, I am more in the art side, but I have to survive). Lousy planning, I know, I am still to green to decide wisely anything, bu5 th3 opportunity to get an equipment half the price (or even less) than it costs here presented to me right now.
You can make money on the art side of photography. Events are not your only option. If you're so into architecture, you can try your hand at real estate photography too.

What exactly are these fast moving scenes, specifically, that you feel the camera is not cutting it?