NeoGAF Camera Equipment Thread | MK II

Zefah

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What exactly are these fast moving scenes, specifically, that you feel the camera is not cutting it?
I could never get AI Servo (autofocus tracking) to produce decent results when I used a t4i as a beginner, so moving subjects were pretty much out of the question for me. Maybe I just had a bad unit or couldn't wrap my head around it. I've never had any trouble with mirrorless cameras and phase detect auto-focus systems, though.
 

Chiaroscuro

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Yup, so many beginners get sidetracked by expensive gear, and don't realize that the most important tool is in your head, and it can be leveled up for free at the library or on YouTube.


You can make money on the art side of photography. Events are not your only option. If you're so into architecture, you can try your hand at real estate photography too.

What exactly are these fast moving scenes, specifically, that you feel the camera is not cutting it?
You all gave me good advices guys, thank you very much. I have decide to invest a little but not that much, I will drop the idea od the 5Dmkiii because frankly I will not explore everything it has. However I will get a full frame camera, because I value wide angle shoots and low light, things that APS are behind. So a cheap original 6D for me. The lack of auto focus points does not bother me since I will not make sport or fast scenes and usually just use the center point and move the camera.

Oh, about your last question the answer is that I feel that my T2i is not up to the simplest moving scenes. If I try a simple panning it stucks after 3 sequential shots and I lose the exactly shot I wanted. But I guess it is not a problem of its servo mode but due to its buffer limitations.

Of course lens should be a best investment. I am thinking in getting the body with an all purpose f4 24-105. Maybe get a cheap f1.8 50mm too.
 

Rentahamster

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Oh, about your last question the answer is that I feel that my T2i is not up to the simplest moving scenes. If I try a simple panning it stucks after 3 sequential shots and I lose the exactly shot I wanted. But I guess it is not a problem of its servo mode but due to its buffer limitations.
Like, what is the scenario, specifically? There are a lot of different kinds of panning shots. There are a lot of variables at play, such as subject speed, context, art style, genre, etc. For example, taking a panning shot of someone strolling down the street, or a football player running towards you, are both motion shots but are still very different.
 

JadedWriter

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Yup, so many beginners get sidetracked by expensive gear, and don't realize that the most important tool is in your head, and it can be leveled up for free at the library or on YouTube.
I think I fell into this hole at first, but at the same time I think my gear grew at the same pace I did. By the time I got my D810 I felt I had decently progressed to the point where I don't feel like I'm wasting it...I should print more, but that's about it. Now if it had been my first camera I would be squandering it because I would be making a great camera look like shit.
 

Rentahamster

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Now if it had been my first camera I would be squandering it because I would be making a great camera look like shit.
And not just that, but I think that if a beginner buys a camera that's too expensive for their skills, then there's all that time they spend learning on that camera that doesn't utilize that camera's capabilities, while accruing wear and tear and becoming obsolete over time.

Now, obsolescence isn't thaaat big of an issue as it used to be since the tech has improved so much over the years, but I really feel that it makes much more sense to learn on something cheap, beat the hell out of it for knowledge's sake, and then upgrade later.
 

sfedai0

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Anyone shooting with Sony FE lenses? Thinking of getting a wide angle lens for landscape/street photog. Any recs? Was thinking of the Batis 25mm.
 

Chiaroscuro

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Like, what is the scenario, specifically? There are a lot of different kinds of panning shots. There are a lot of variables at play, such as subject speed, context, art style, genre, etc. For example, taking a panning shot of someone strolling down the street, or a football player running towards you, are both motion shots but are still very different.
A simple exercise like a not so fast object moving perperdicular to you (more sense of movement) like a car in a street and you want to motion blur the background. So you shoot continuosly at 1/20 for example, tracking the object. The camera took 3 shots, stuck a little, took another one and stuck after that. My guess is that either the buffering/writing to the card is slow or something on the servo AF is slowing the camera (well I can shoot continuosly at a static object so the writing may not be the problem....)
 

Zefah

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Anyone shooting with Sony FE lenses? Thinking of getting a wide angle lens for landscape/street photog. Any recs? Was thinking of the Batis 25mm.
The Sony 28mm f/2 lens is the widest I have, but it's quite good! Wide, but not so much that human subjects start looking weird up close.

I really want to get the recently released 16-35mm f/2.8 GM Lens, but damn it's expensive. Even the 12-24mm f/4 lens is a bit pricey. I'll probably cave and get one of them eventually, though.
 

JadedWriter

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And not just that, but I think that if a beginner buys a camera that's too expensive for their skills, then there's all that time they spend learning on that camera that doesn't utilize that camera's capabilities, while accruing wear and tear and becoming obsolete over time.

Now, obsolescence isn't thaaat big of an issue as it used to be since the tech has improved so much over the years, but I really feel that it makes much more sense to learn on something cheap, beat the hell out of it for knowledge's sake, and then upgrade later.
Funny enough I feel like I shoot more with my D810 than I did with my D7100. I got my start on the 7100, but the D810 gets so much damn use these days. I guess it was a lot harder for me to get photoshoots when I had the 7100 (because my experience and skills weren't great) and I had way less work related shoots as well. It's part of the reason I got the XT2. I needed to balance the stuff out between a couple of cameras. I am grateful for my early days though. Now I feel like it's more photographer than the actual equipment these days.
 

Thraktor

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Anyone shooting with Sony FE lenses? Thinking of getting a wide angle lens for landscape/street photog. Any recs? Was thinking of the Batis 25mm.
Check out phillipreeve.net, I've found them to be a good resource for lens reviews/impressions on the FE system, including both native and adapted lenses. In particular, they've just updated their list of native lenses here, which includes (very positive) comments on the 25mm Batis, and also the other options if you want to stay native.
 

sfedai0

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Check out phillipreeve.net, I've found them to be a good resource for lens reviews/impressions on the FE system, including both native and adapted lenses. In particular, they've just updated their list of native lenses here, which includes (very positive) comments on the 25mm Batis, and also the other options if you want to stay native.
nice! bookmarked.
The Sony 28mm f/2 lens is the widest I have, but it's quite good! Wide, but not so much that human subjects start looking weird up close.

I really want to get the recently released 16-35mm f/2.8 GM Lens, but damn it's expensive. Even the 12-24mm f/4 lens is a bit pricey. I'll probably cave and get one of them eventually, though.

Yea the 28 is a possibility if I decide I want to save some money. The distortion does bother me though. Zooms are very tempting since theyre so versatile, but from experience, they are just too heavy to bring on a trip.
 

KalBalboa

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Unless you need it to be "dual purpose" (ie regular shooting in addition to macro), I'd be far more likely to recommend getting a manual focus only macro lens; if you're looking for the 50mm focal length, there are tons of options that can be very cheap. Or, for a more modern option, a little bit more will get you the Laowa 60mm, which goes to 2x magnification, for even closer shots (Though, it will vignette slightly when used for non macro shots).

The Sony 50mm macro doesn't even seem to have OSS, so I see no reason to get one, personally. It's going to be focus by wire, and MF is much, much more important in macro than AF.

Now, if you're getting this in lieu of say a 50 1.8 and it'll be your regular walk around lens, go for it! Seems to be a fairly chunky discount.
Thanks for your thoughts. I own the FE 55 1.8 and numerous other primes, but I lack a macro in my kit. My two bodies are an A7S and A6000, so I try and stay Sony with my glass (although I DO have the Metabones Mk V).

I have it. It's my only macro lens, so I don't really have anything to compare it against, but I quite like it! Definitely let's me get in super close on things and the image quality is quite good on my A7r II. The close-up auto-focus is quite slow, but I usually just manually focused anyway.

Here's someone's review of it I found on Google. For the money, I would say it's a good value.

https://phillipreeve.net/blog/rolling-review-sony-fe-2-850-macro/
Yeah, I read the same review yesterday. It's so tempting at this price.
 

Astral/H3X

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Thanks for your thoughts. I own the FE 55 1.8 and numerous other primes, but I lack a macro in my kit. My two bodies are an A7S and A6000, so I try and stay Sony with my glass (although I DO have the Metabones Mk V).



Yeah, I read the same review yesterday. It's so tempting at this price.
Yeah, if you have the 55 1.8, that's the Zeiss right? If that's the case you're pretty unlikely to prefer using any macro lens you get for anything but Macro.
With that being said, the following photos were taken with the ~$80 Canon FD 50mm 3.5 Macro:

20160512-20160512-DSC03458.jpg by Hunter Mauro, on Flickr
20160512-20160512-DSC03469.jpg by Hunter Mauro, on Flickr
20160512-20160512-DSC03411.jpg by Hunter Mauro, on Flickr
20160512-20160512-DSC03481.jpg by Hunter Mauro, on Flickr
 
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The camera took 3 shots, stuck a little, took another one and stuck after that. My guess is that either the buffering/writing to the card is slow or something on the servo AF is slowing the camera (well I can shoot continuosly at a static object so the writing may not be the problem....)
You're shooting RAW + JPEG, probably. Change that to RAW only and your buffer will jump to 9-10 shots and, trust me, you'll never use those JPEGs. Camera generates preview images to include in the RAW files anyway. Also, get a fast memory card so it can dump the buffer to the card faster. That also might or not help extend your buffer.

You could do JPEG only and probably get a couple dozen shots, as well, but no one should be shooting JPEG only.
 

Sec0nd

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I'm starting to notice that I don't really enjoy the perfectly clean and crisp lenses. I usually shoot the Sigma ART 35mm 1.4 which is probably still my favorite lens. But I'm loving the weird quirks of my older Zeiss 50mm 1.4. The bokeh is funkier, the flaring is way different. It's just cool.

I also watched some films shot with the LOMO anamorphic lenses. I'd murder people to get my hands on those lenses. But those lenses also have some weird quirks and do something funny with the out of focus areas that's super interesting.

What are some lenses to look out for that have unique characteristics? I don't like the swirly bokeh from the old Russian 35mm film lenses by the way.

PS: I primarily shoot video.
 

RuGalz

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A simple exercise like a not so fast object moving perperdicular to you (more sense of movement) like a car in a street and you want to motion blur the background. So you shoot continuosly at 1/20 for example, tracking the object. The camera took 3 shots, stuck a little, took another one and stuck after that. My guess is that either the buffering/writing to the card is slow or something on the servo AF is slowing the camera (well I can shoot continuosly at a static object so the writing may not be the problem....)
Another thing besides raw/jpeg buffer fill as mentioned above is, make sure you are using center point only in this scenario. Esp lower end cameras will end up hunting more if you have other focus point active. It could be that it took two shots and end up hunting for focus. (And by default your camera is probably set to not taking photo unless the camera thinks it has focus so it pauses while looking for focus.) I've taught various people on T2/3/4i doing panning shots; I honestly can't recall having any problem with right settings.
 

Chiaroscuro

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You're shooting RAW + JPEG, probably. Change that to RAW only and your buffer will jump to 9-10 shots and, trust me, you'll never use those JPEGs. Camera generates preview images to include in the RAW files anyway. Also, get a fast memory card so it can dump the buffer to the card faster. That also might or not help extend your buffer.

You could do JPEG only and probably get a couple dozen shots, as well, but no one should be shooting JPEG only.
Thanks! I completely forgot about disabling jpeg. Truly I don’t know why I set it, must be because when you are learning they always tell you to do so, but I agree that jpeg is quite useless unless you are in a hurry to send something.

Another thing besides raw/jpeg buffer fill as mentioned above is, make sure you are using center point only in this scenario. Esp lower end cameras will end up hunting more if you have other focus point active. It could be that it took two shots and end up hunting for focus. (And by default your camera is probably set to not taking photo unless the camera thinks it has focus so it pauses while looking for focus.) I've taught various people on T2/3/4i doing panning shots; I honestly can't recall having any problem with right settings.
I think everything there was right. Burst mode, AF Servo, single centered point.

But of course my sdcard is not also a great one, class 10 333x, but disabling jpeg may help me with the issue.
 

Zefah

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Yea the 28 is a possibility if I decide I want to save some money. The distortion does bother me though. Zooms are very tempting since theyre so versatile, but from experience, they are just too heavy to bring on a trip.
Distortion? I definitely don't notice any after the lens profile is applied to the RAW files in Lightroom.
 

JadedWriter

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Thanks! I completely forgot about disabling jpeg. Truly I don’t know why I set it, must be because when you are learning they always tell you to do so, but I agree that jpeg is quite useless unless you are in a hurry to send something.



I think everything there was right. Burst mode, AF Servo, single centered point.

But of course my sdcard is not also a great one, class 10 333x, but disabling jpeg may help me with the issue.
It's only something I do on a two memory card camera. It's pretty much an "In case memory card fucks up" technique.
 
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Are there any photography books widely considered to be the best when it comes to instruction? I'm just looking for a "classic" introduction to 35mm photography.
I learned on Langford's Basic Photography and Peterson's Understanding Exposure.

Basic Photography is a bit dry, but covers all the base stuff from understanding optics to the fundamentals of exposure and composition. Understanding Exposure is THE book to read and internalize so exposure becomes second nature to you. Everything there is to know about the topic is covered here.

There's also a pair of books by Michael Freeman that I got later on but couldn't recommend more: The Photographer's Eye and The Photographer's Mind. They are deep dives into the creative side of photography and explore composition, design, creative process and photography as communication. Great books not only for photographers, but all kinds of visual artists (and people working with design, as well).
 

Beer Monkey

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Looking for advice on shooting sky timelapse with my X100F since it has an intervalometer. Recommended settings and the like. I know to use a fixed white balance if I shoot some of them on JPG for space savings and probably around 30 second exposures at around ISO3200 and F2 for night sky stuff and very little about shooting day stuff and nothing about sunrise/sunset (which I know is tough without a DSLR and special software that controls the camera for 'holy grail' results). I'll be in places like Joshua Tree and Yosemite and Death Valley, both day and night. Any suggestions are welcome, especially from X100T/F owners or cameras with very similar capabilities.

One thing that seems encouraging is if I plug a USB power source into the camera the battery doesn't seem to drain so I may be able to take hours of exposures without swapping batteries.
 

Zefah

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What in the world? That is the most hipster garbage I think I've ever seen. Why would anyone want that? Why not buy an actual film camera and actual film?

What a sales pitch... "All of the inconveniences of film and mechanical cameras and none of the benefits!"

Am I missing something?
 

JadedWriter

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Why not just buy a Fuji and look like you're shooting analog but enjoy all of the benefits of digital in the process.
 

Zefah

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Yeah...unless I'm missing something, that looks like garbage. But hey, if people want to buy it, then who am I to stop them.
I actually just read through the Kickstarter pitch and the whole thing just made me really angry. They are so full of shit.

Seems like they just found an old bargain bin smartphone sensor and threw it in a body of probably cheaply made parts and made it only work with overpriced proprietary memory cards that also lock in the ISO and picture settings.

Anyone with a decent smartphone from the last 4 years already has a more functional camera that can produce better images.
 

Chiaroscuro

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I actually just read through the Kickstarter pitch and the whole thing just made me really angry. They are so full of shit.

Seems like they just found an old bargain bin smartphone sensor they could get a ton of and threw it in a body of probably cheaply made parts and made it only work with overpriced proprietary memory cards that also lock in the ISO and picture settings.

Anyone with a decent smartphone from the last 4 years already has a more functional camera that can produce better images.
Plus that cartridges are not memory cards, they only store the camera “settings” and you still need a sdcard to save the photos, which you cannot review (no lcd) and cannot delete in the camera itself.

It is the most pile of shit pretending to be something I ever seen.

Why the hell anyone would like to change a piece of plastic (that contains nothing the camera itself does not have) everytime he wants to use a different photo setting?
 

Zefah

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Plus that cartridges are not memory cards, they only store the camera ”settings" and you still need a sdcard to save the photos, which you cannot review (no lcd) and cannot delete in the camera itself.
Wow, that's even worse. They are seriously selling camera setting profiles as physical media and treating the lack of an LCD screen and delete button as a "feature."

It is the most pile of shit pretending to be something I ever seen.

Why the hell anyone would like to change a piece of plastic everytime he wants to use a different photo setting?
It's for those people who felt that needing to dig into menus of entry-level DSLRs to choose your ISO was just *too* easy.
 

RuGalz

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It's cute, not that I'll buy it unless I find it for 10 bucks with B&W digiFilm (ok maybe 20). It's kind of a novelty thing similar to Fuji's Instax cameras.
 

ShadowKingpin

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So, many pages back I asked about Sony A7II vs. the GH5 for film work, but I just found an amazing deal from a friend for his Canon C100. He wants $1,800 and was only used a few times. He's upgrading to another camera, but I have never owned a cinema camera (Film is my major). How many of you here have used the C100 and what are your thoughts? I understand that it is 1080p (Which I am fine with for a Super 35mm Sensor and no overheating like on Sony mirrorless), but for a professional-grade camera at that price, it sounds like an amazing deal. Is it worth biting for someone wanting to get their first cinema camera?

Also, I have read online when looking at shutter lifespan for cinema cameras, that they count them in hours vs. shutter count on DSLR's and Mirrorless. I can't seem to find a lifespan for the C100, so I'm curious as to how that is determined? I hope none of these are stupid questions, but the thought of buying a quality camera for film work is pretty exciting!
 

opticalmace

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So, many pages back I asked about Sony A7II vs. the GH5 for film work, but I just found an amazing deal from a friend for his Canon C100. He wants $1,800 and was only used a few times. He's upgrading to another camera, but I have never owned a cinema camera (Film is my major). How many of you here have used the C100 and what are your thoughts? I understand that it is 1080p (Which I am fine with for a Super 35mm Sensor and no overheating like on Sony mirrorless), but for a professional-grade camera at that price, it sounds like an amazing deal. Is it worth biting for someone wanting to get their first cinema camera?

Also, I have read online when looking at shutter lifespan for cinema cameras, that they count them in hours vs. shutter count on DSLR's and Mirrorless. I can't seem to find a lifespan for the C100, so I'm curious as to how that is determined? I hope none of these are stupid questions, but the thought of buying a quality camera for film work is pretty exciting!
Don't know anything about it but I will say B&H has it new for $2300.
 

z3phon

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Yup, so many beginners get sidetracked by expensive gear, and don't realize that the most important tool is in your head, and it can be leveled up for free at the library or on YouTube.


You can make money on the art side of photography. Events are not your only option. If you're so into architecture, you can try your hand at real estate photography too.

What exactly are these fast moving scenes, specifically, that you feel the camera is not cutting it?
Are there any good youtube pages you could recommend that are for helpful for new photographers.
 

Rentahamster

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Are there any good youtube pages you could recommend that are for helpful for new photographers.
Tony Northrup's Youtube page has lots of good beginner guides in it. He also goes into more advanced stuff in separate videos (and I don't necessarily agree with his approach to certain aspects of the technical stuff in the advanced videos), but the beginner stuff is great, and is an easy to digest guide to the basics.
 

Astral/H3X

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So, many pages back I asked about Sony A7II vs. the GH5 for film work, but I just found an amazing deal from a friend for his Canon C100. He wants $1,800 and was only used a few times. He's upgrading to another camera, but I have never owned a cinema camera (Film is my major). How many of you here have used the C100 and what are your thoughts? I understand that it is 1080p (Which I am fine with for a Super 35mm Sensor and no overheating like on Sony mirrorless), but for a professional-grade camera at that price, it sounds like an amazing deal. Is it worth biting for someone wanting to get their first cinema camera?

Also, I have read online when looking at shutter lifespan for cinema cameras, that they count them in hours vs. shutter count on DSLR's and Mirrorless. I can't seem to find a lifespan for the C100, so I'm curious as to how that is determined? I hope none of these are stupid questions, but the thought of buying a quality camera for film work is pretty exciting!
I would imagine it's counted in hours because a cinema camera isn't going to be operated by closing a shutter but in recording video.

I'm not into film, but my first thoughts are going to be that it will be, first and foremost, beyond absolutely anything, a video camera. That sounds obvious, and it is, but those film cameras from the look of it aren't meant to be operated in any capacity outside of a rig. I'm sure it can be done, but they don't exactly look like they have handheld use in mind. I would expect any actual photo taking to be rudimentary and far from convenient.

That being said, it should be pretty much amazing for video. I'd say as long as you're fine with it being a single purpose camera, and you're really okay with 1080p only (Tony Northrup gives quite a few reasons for going with 4k even if you're out putting to 1080p), it should be a dream to operate on a shoulder rig.
But I'm not a video guy! So take what I say with a grain of salt.

EDIT: I'll second using Tony Northrup and the like for learning. I'll also say Matt Granger. There are others out there, but they can be very technical or very vendor specific. Tony more than anyone I feel goes into mindset and general workflow, which is so very helpful at the start.
You can also look up Kai from DigitalRev if you want some sarcastic humor too. He mainly reviews, and he's very uh, I wouldn't say "technical" with his reviews, but I found he's good at cutting the crap when it comes to what actual means a shit on a camera.

If you get or even are interested in getting a Sony, check out Jason Lanier, and if you're getting a Nikon check Apotheosis, both go into why they love their respective systems, but do expect to get a smidge of "shill" from them (not that they are paid, they just really love their chosen system and go into why).
 

JadedWriter

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Apotheosis is also heavily into Fuji so he's actually pretty good when it comes to their system. Though I'm finding that his opinion on certain Fuji lenses is a bit hard to read. It's mostly regarding the 1.4 and F2 23 and 35 lenses.
 

sneaky77

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Apotheosis is also heavily into Fuji so he's actually pretty good when it comes to their system. Though I'm finding that his opinion on certain Fuji lenses is a bit hard to read. It's mostly regarding the 1.4 and F2 23 and 35 lenses.
I haven't heard his opinions, but most opinions I've heard is the f2 is a little softer on the 23, but the 35 is pretty good.
I have the 1.4 35 and think is great. I've never had much trouble with the focusing like some people claim on it.

I like the reviews of TheCameraStore, those guys seem pretty cool.
 

JadedWriter

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I haven't heard his opinions, but most opinions I've heard is the f2 is a little softer on the 23, but the 35 is pretty good.
I have the 1.4 35 and think is great. I've never had much trouble with the focusing like some people claim on it.

I like the reviews of TheCameraStore, those guys seem pretty cool.
TCS can be pretty funny at times, though they sort take pics of the same things...the landscapes are great though. I find them a lot more tolerable than the older digitalrev stuff. I'm still trying to figure out my next Fuji lens...I have a lot more than I thought I would. I have the 35F2, 90F2, 16-55 2.8 and just got the 50-140 yesterday. I might get either the 16 1.4 or 23 1.4. I'm not really sure, depends on pricing. Still need to trade in the 18-55 for some credit because I'm not using that for anything.
 

ShadowKingpin

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I would imagine it's counted in hours because a cinema camera isn't going to be operated by closing a shutter but in recording video.

I'm not into film, but my first thoughts are going to be that it will be, first and foremost, beyond absolutely anything, a video camera. That sounds obvious, and it is, but those film cameras from the look of it aren't meant to be operated in any capacity outside of a rig. I'm sure it can be done, but they don't exactly look like they have handheld use in mind. I would expect any actual photo taking to be rudimentary and far from convenient.

That being said, it should be pretty much amazing for video. I'd say as long as you're fine with it being a single purpose camera, and you're really okay with 1080p only (Tony Northrup gives quite a few reasons for going with 4k even if you're out putting to 1080p), it should be a dream to operate on a shoulder rig.
But I'm not a video guy! So take what I say with a grain of salt.

EDIT: I'll second using Tony Northrup and the like for learning. I'll also say Matt Granger. There are others out there, but they can be very technical or very vendor specific. Tony more than anyone I feel goes into mindset and general workflow, which is so very helpful at the start.
You can also look up Kai from DigitalRev if you want some sarcastic humor too. He mainly reviews, and he's very uh, I wouldn't say "technical" with his reviews, but I found he's good at cutting the crap when it comes to what actual means a shit on a camera.

If you get or even are interested in getting a Sony, check out Jason Lanier, and if you're getting a Nikon check Apotheosis, both go into why they love their respective systems, but do expect to get a smidge of "shill" from them (not that they are paid, they just really love their chosen system and go into why).
Many thanks for the help! My only reasoning for looking at a video-only camera now is the dynamic range, barely any rolling shutting and it has a 35mm sensor. The Sony A7SII is nice for 4K and 35mm sensor, but the battery is awful, it overheats when filming, rolling shutter is horrid and the IBIS isn't good. The GH5 is a MFT and that alone partially kills it for me at that price range. They aren't bad cameras in general, but for professional film work, if seems like an actual video camera is the way to go.

I am really disappointed that a quality 4K 35mm film camera isn't at $2,000, yet, but at least the C100 films in 4K, but outputs in 1080p. That's how I view it, I guess.
 

sneaky77

Member
Jan 15, 2008
8,245
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TCS can be pretty funny at times, though they sort take pics of the same things...the landscapes are great though. I find them a lot more tolerable than the older digitalrev stuff. I'm still trying to figure out my next Fuji lens...I have a lot more than I thought I would. I have the 35F2, 90F2, 16-55 2.8 and just got the 50-140 yesterday. I might get either the 16 1.4 or 23 1.4. I'm not really sure, depends on pricing. Still need to trade in the 18-55 for some credit because I'm not using that for anything.
A lot of people swear by the 16mm 1.4 as the best fuji lens, plus for city scape in NY it may be good too.
 

Astral/H3X

Member
Aug 17, 2012
10,178
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SOMEWHERE. In Indiana
Many thanks for the help! My only reasoning for looking at a video-only camera now is the dynamic range, barely any rolling shutting and it has a 35mm sensor. The Sony A7SII is nice for 4K and 35mm sensor, but the battery is awful, it overheats when filming, rolling shutter is horrid and the IBIS isn't good. The GH5 is a MFT and that alone partially kills it for me at that price range. They aren't bad cameras in general, but for professional film work, if seems like an actual video camera is the way to go.

I am really disappointed that a quality 4K 35mm film camera isn't at $2,000, yet, but at least the C100 films in 4K, but outputs in 1080p. That's how I view it, I guess.
Yeah, as a video focused camera it'll be AWESOME for film work; it'll just be terrible at photos!

The way I've heard it, a photo focused camera is better at video, than a video focused camera is at photo, if that makes sense. But if your only desire is video, or you're already covered for photo, I'd go for it.
 

ShadowKingpin

Member
Jan 13, 2008
3,237
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United States
Yeah, as a video focused camera it'll be AWESOME for film work; it'll just be terrible at photos!

The way I've heard it, a photo focused camera is better at video, than a video focused camera is at photo, if that makes sense. But if your only desire is video, or you're already covered for photo, I'd go for it.
Yeah, I have photo covered. I have my old 6D for now and I usually only do portraits, so no worries there.
 

JadedWriter

Member
Sep 14, 2014
30,600
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A lot of people swear by the 16mm 1.4 as the best fuji lens, plus for city scape in NY it may be good too.
Yeah I keep hearing this. On another note how long do flashes tend to last for you guys? I had mine for about a year and a half and now have to replace mine because of gravity.