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New PS VITA LED compared to PS Vita OLED. (Screenshot)

Fafalada

Fafracer forever
Jun 22, 2004
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XOMTOR said:
Not completely off but there was certainly no 'mura' effect, blotches or lines to be seen.
The leakage seems to even out over time into uniform "gray" (it did on my vita). And all recent Galaxy phones I've seen (from nexus onwards) have the same effect as vita display in dark.
Should note that if you put say, an ipad screen next to them,lcd glow completely drowns the oleds leak, making it appear solid black.
 

Possum

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Apr 11, 2013
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That OLED screen looks absolutely gorgeous. The LCD screen still looks good, but there's no comparison in my eyes.
 

$h@d0w

Junior Member
Sep 30, 2005
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My Galaxy Nexus screen is perfect and better than the Vita screen but colors did need recalibrating with a custom patch.
 

hardvibes

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May 22, 2013
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I don't own a handheld console and I don't plan to buy one.... but the OLED obviously looks better. LED is a downgrade.

That green tint...
 

Truespeed

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May 6, 2007
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This is incorrect.

OLED displays have a much larger colorspace than LCD displays, colors of source materials are oversaturated and made too contrasty to look good on the limited colorspace of LCD displays, when the same material is displayed on an OLED display it appears too saturated and contrasty. Material made especially for display on an OLED display will look better than anything an LCD display could show.

No it's not. There's a reason why companies like Apple avoid using AMOLED displays on their phones. The color reproduction isn't as good as the colors a high end IPS LCD panel can produce. According to a 2013 quote from Tim Cook:

If you ever buy anything online and really want to know what the color is, as many people do, you should really think twice before you depend on the color from a OLED display.

I'm going to guess Tim and the Apple engineers know a bit about what they're talking about when it comes to color representation on LCD and OLED panels.

Furthermore the Vita uses a super amoled display, which has a normal RGB layout, just like LCD displays, it does not use an inferior pentile subpixel arrangement.

Could you post the sub pixel arrangement used on the Vita? Because I'm really curious to see how the RGB subpixels are laid out. This is a comparison of the Samsung Galaxy S3 Super AMOLED screen and the HTC One X Super LCD 2 screen:



That's a pretty nasty subpixel arrangement on that Super AMOLED in comparison to the beautifully uniform subpixels of the Super LCD 2 display. The uniform sub pixels of an LCD will always produce better color than the non uniform sub pixel arrangements of an AMOLED due to the need to overcompensate on the blue subpixel which degrades faster.
 

longdi

Ni hao ma, fellow kids?
Jun 7, 2004
8,451
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LCD Vita looks greener
OLED Vita looks bluer with overblown colours.

Viewing angles look good for LCD Vita.

Not much a 'downgrade'.
 

hongcha

Member
Aug 7, 2011
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From these new comparison screens the OLED has oversaturated colours and almost bluish whites. I prefer the look of the new LCD screen: the colours are warmer and look more natural. Great viewing angles too. Reminds me of my ipad 2 screen overall.
 

butman

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Jan 23, 2013
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So, a good strategy by Sony with a clear second intention here:

Releasing a cheap revision of their portable console, then making people that doesn't have a Vita yet, run and buy an OG one before they disappear.
 

Nikodemos

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May 25, 2013
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To me it looks like colors are oversaturated on the OG Vita, the red in particular. In the short clip, that coin which is spinning during the loading screen looks like clay on the OG, whereas its true color is golden (as seen on the LCD). The contrast, brightness, gamma etc. settings need to be equalised on both screens for a proper comparison though.
 

entremet

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Dec 6, 2008
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So, a good strategy by Sony with a clear second intention here:

Releasing a cheap revision of their portable console, then making people that doesn't have a Vita yet, run and buy an OG one before they disappear.

It's not like people having been buying the thing before this.
 

Apparition

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May 28, 2009
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To me it looks like colors are oversaturated on the OG Vita, the red in particular. In the short clip, that coin which is spinning during the loading screen looks like clay on the OG, whereas its true color is golden (as seen on the LCD). The contrast, brightness, gamma etc. settings need to be equalised on both screens for a proper comparison though.

The only setting that's user-adjustable on the PS Vita is the screen brightness.

It could be safely presumed that both screens were set to the factory default (around 80% on the OLED).
 

vivftp

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Jan 18, 2013
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Well original Vita seems to take the screen comparison for providing a pleasing picture in normal room conditions. I wonder if the tables will turn when we get outdoor comparisons. I've previously posted a pic I took earlier this year showing the sort of cruddy experience I had trying to use my Vita while on vacation. Considering the portable nature of the Vita I would hope that the revisions outdoor use has been improved. Here's the pic I took:

 

vivftp

Member
Jan 18, 2013
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The Vita's sub-pixel structure looks nothing like the pic you posted. According to digitalversus.com, below is a close-up of the Vita's sub-pixel structure:

That's the Galaxy S2. They just say the Vita arrangement looks similar
 

EatinOlives

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Oct 23, 2011
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These comparisons are ridiculous. Think about the fact we're "comparing" two different types of screens from offscreen photos taken by out-of-focus digital cameras, and we're viewing these images on what are likely to be LCD screens. There's no reasonable way to make any kind of conclusion based on these. The so-called "oversaturated" colors of the OLED Vita is just a digital camera being shitty.

None of the photos showing the OLED Vita do the real screen justice. OLED by definition has better image quality than LCD.
 

Nikodemos

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May 25, 2013
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The so-called "oversaturated" colors of the OLED Vita is just a digital camera being shitty.

None of the photos showing the OLED Vita do the real screen justice. OLED by definition has better image quality than LCD.
Replace "by definition" with "theoretically". And oversaturation is a known issue.

From DigitalVersus:

It's not too much of a surprise to see that colours aren't reproduced accurately. The average Delta E is 5.2, whereas we consider colours to be accurate with a Delta E of 3 or lower.



We measured an average colour temperature of 8833 K, while the ideal reading should be nearer 6500 K.



Finally, the gamma (see below) holds up well enough, even if the average reading comes out at 2.3 instead of 2.1.

 

hongcha

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Aug 7, 2011
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The so-called "oversaturated" colors of the OLED Vita is just a digital camera being shitty.

I have an OG Vita sitting right here next to me, and I've always found its colours to be oversaturated (not terribly so, but more than I'd like, if given a choice). I'm really looking forward to the new LCD model.
 

AgentOtaku

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Nov 21, 2005
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I'm not gonna lie

I'm tempted as hell to import (if it's never brought over to the US of course) a white 2000 merely for the color/form factor alone.

They got rid of the piano finish right? Now it's just reflective ala current day PSPs/OG 3DS?
 

Dunan

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Mar 6, 2010
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Not according to what I am looking at. Even Play Asia Vita's go for $300. This could always be wrong but I consider cnet a pretty valid source.

You may be remembering the exchange rates at launch; at that time, when it was 75-80 yen per dollar, Y24,000 was about $300. In just the past 10 months or so the yen has lost a quarter of its value against the dollar. Thanks for nothing, Prime Minister Abe. :(
 

LamerDeluxe

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Nov 18, 2006
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No it's not. There's a reason why companies like Apple avoid using AMOLED displays on their phones. The color reproduction isn't as good as the colors a high end IPS LCD panel can produce. According to a 2013 quote from Tim Cook:

I'm going to guess Tim and the Apple engineers know a bit about what they're talking about when it comes to color representation on LCD and OLED panels.

Apple has been known to lie about lots of things, so that doesn't convince me.

Could you post the sub pixel arrangement used on the Vita? Because I'm really curious to see how the RGB subpixels are laid out. This is a comparison of the Samsung Galaxy S3 Super AMOLED screen and the HTC One X Super LCD 2 screen:



That's a pretty nasty subpixel arrangement on that Super AMOLED in comparison to the beautifully uniform subpixels of the Super LCD 2 display. The uniform sub pixels of an LCD will always produce better color than the non uniform sub pixel arrangements of an AMOLED due to the need to overcompensate on the blue subpixel which degrades faster.

That image uses a pentile arrangement, this is the is what the Vita uses (super AMOLED plus):



Here is some information about OLED display technology:
http://www.redsharknews.com/technology/item/91-exclusive-the-truth-about-oled-monitors

Figure 1 shows a comparison of the response time differences between LCDs and OLEDs. OLEDs are about a thousand times faster than LCDs switching from on to off and this speed eliminates any ghosting or image distortion prevalent in fast moving images shown on LCDs.

OLED displays are even faster than CRT displays. For games and video this is an important factor.

When viewing an image from frame to frame, the OLEDs have a thousand times the contrast ratio of LCDs; dipping to ten times within a frame. The impact of these differences is the inability of LCDs to differentiate between multiple dark gray levels: the dark images in the Batman films are good examples of this.

The reason is that the OLED gamma curve is essentially linear, meaning for every change in current there is a similar change in luminance, while the LCD gamma curve is non-linear. For the lower gray scales, the gamma curve is close to vertical resulting in large changes in luminance for small changes in voltage, while at close the saturation, the gamma curve is flat, meaning small changes in luminance for large voltage changes.

This part is important, for OLED displays to oversaturate or increase contrast, their gamma curve would have to be very non-linear. But the gamma curve of OLED turns out to be very linear, while that of an LCD display is non-linear. If you create images that adjust for the non-linear gamma curve of LCD displays, essentially boosting saturation for lower saturation levels, that same image will appear to be oversaturated when displayed on an OLED display. OLED displays do not oversaturate, LCD displays undersaturate.

The one drawback to using OLEDs for cinematic applications is their high cost, approximately 50% to 100% higher than comparable TFT LCDs.

And that is what it is all about.
 

Durante

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No it's not. There's a reason why companies like Apple avoid using AMOLED displays on their phones. The color reproduction isn't as good as the colors a high end IPS LCD panel can produce. According to a 2013 quote from Tim Cook:
That's just what LamerDeluxe was talking about though: current content is designed for the small color space reresented by most LCDs. OLED has a larger (and thus "more natural") color space. You just need content and color profiles in software to make good use of it.


Could you post the sub pixel arrangement used on the Vita? Because I'm really curious to see how the RGB subpixels are laid out.
[Edit: it's already in the post above.]
I hate non-uniform subpixel layouts, but they are not used in Super AMOLED plus. Which is used on Vita and e.g. the Galaxy S2.


In any case, this talk about subpixel arrangements and color spaces is beside the point. For gaming color accuracy is not nearly as important as contrast and response times. And OLED is completely unmatched by any LC technology in this regard.
 

XOMTOR

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Feb 11, 2011
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Correct me if I'm wrong but didn't Sony state that they had no plans to release the Vita 2000 (and 64GB memory card) outside of Japan? So this OLED vs LCD debate (and running out to purchase backup OLED models) may be "jumping the gun" if they're still gonna be selling the original Vita here. Perhaps there's just so much leftover stock of the original model in the supply chain that there's no reason to bring the new model over.

I know Sony (Yoshida) has said that VitaTV will be coming eventually though.
 

lordchompy

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Sep 16, 2012
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Correct me if I'm wrong but didn't Sony state that they had no plans to release the Vita 2000 (and 64GB memory card) outside of Japan? So this OLED vs LCD debate (and running out to purchase backup OLED models) may be "jumping the gun" if they're still gonna be selling the original Vita here. Perhaps there's just so much leftover stock of the original model in the supply chain that there's no reason to bring the new model over.

I know Sony (Yoshida) has said that VitaTV will be coming eventually though.

Right, that and the price discrepancy between 2000 and the original makes releasing it in NA right now a poor marketing decision.

Japanese might not mind the small parity in screen quality in exchange for a lighter, longer lasting handheld at the same price point, but damn it, most of us Americans are not going to be happy about dropping the most expensive, and the most stand-out hardware component and nary a dip in the price.

Vita 2k will need to be much less than $200 to move any units here -- VitaGAFers aside, of course.