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Nintendo sends special braille letter to a blind fan

maxcriden

Member
Sep 15, 2013
34,165
1
715
www.neogaf.com
I thought this was a heartwarming story and wanted to share it with you all.



Dear Nintendo,

Hello. My name is Hibiki Sakai and I am in fifth grade. I am blind, but I’ve always wanted to play video games like everyone else. But there aren’t many games I can play at all. The one game I can really play is Rhythm Tengoku. It’s the only game I can enjoy together with others, and I never lose at it. I’ve gotten perfect scores on all the versions on the Game Boy Advance, Nintendo DS, Wii, and 3DS too.

So I really, really want you to make more Rhythm Tengoku games. And it’s perfectly fine if you make them a little harder too!

I think that there are a lot of other kids with visual impairments who want to play video games but can’t. So I’d love for you to develop more games for people with handicaps to enjoy playing with others.

I will always support you, Nintendo.

From Hibiki Sakai
Hibiki's Dad said:
My son Hibiki is blind and has perfectly cleared every game in the Rhythm Tengoku series, the only games he can play. He sent Nintendo a letter and they actually responded! Them sending such a sincere correspondence to just one person is truly divine customer service. Nintendo, we’re anxiously awaiting the next installment in the series!
Nintendo's reply:





Thank you so much for sending us here at Nintendo your heartwarming letter.

We are so happy to hear that you’ve perfected and enjoyed Rhythm Tengoku, Rhythm Tengoku Gold, Minna no Rhythm Tengoku, and Rhythm Tengoku The Best.

We have passed on your letter to Nintendo’s development department. We want to keep making games that everyone can have fun playing, so thank you for your support.
-

And while waiting for new releases, Hibiki is keeping busy. He’s talented not only at music games, but at playing the drums too. You can see a video of him showing his impressive skills [at the link]. Since hearing about his story, Hibiki has been invited to play the drums at big events in Osaka.
Hibiki’s father has said that his son undergoing surgery was nothing but “days full of pain and tears,” but seeing Hibiki persevere has taught him that “it’s not having a disability that causes sorrow… but letting the disability hold you back that causes it.”
Full article here:

http://en.rocketnews24.com/2017/05/21/blind-japanese-boy-sends-nintendo-heartwarming-thank-you-letter-gets-amazing-response/ (via GoNintendo.com)

--

Bonus Content

That article also links to an interesting story about "divine customer service" in Japan from Nintendo and other companies:

http://en.rocketnews24.com/2013/12/28/tales-of-divine-customer-service-from- nintendo-disney-and-other-companies-in-japan/

Here are a couple choice excerpts:

This dedication has been shown to extend all the way to the top at the company. In the early 1990s, an elementary school student was riding his bike when he was hit by a car. During his subsequent stay in the hospital, the boy wanted to play some games, but his Game Boy had been in the basket of his bike at the time of the accident, and was so damaged it had to be sent to Nintendo for repairs.

The maintenance department, shocked at the abuse the handheld system had taken, called the boy’s mother to inquire about how it had ended up in such a state. She told them about the accident, and a few days later the boy received a new Game Boy, along with a note telling him to watch out for cars signed by “Yokoi,” ostensibly Game Boy designer Gunpei Yokoi.
Similarly, another Nintendo fan recalls saving up his allowance and buying a Famicom game on the day of its release, but accidentally breaking the cartridge in less than a week. Distraught, he sent it to Nintendo to be fixed. One week later, a box came for the boy, containing a new copy of the game, repayment of the initial shipping fee, some Mario merchandise, and a handwritten letter, saying:

“
“Thanks for buying our game, and sorry to hear about it breaking just when you were having fun with it. Try to be more careful, but since you’re still in elementary school, I’m guessing you don’t have much money to pay for repairs, so this time Uncle Miyamoto will take care of it for you.”
 

Dark Cloud

Member
Feb 2, 2016
12,012
0
295
I feel like every few months we get a new heartwarming story about Nintendo and someone who is handicapped or ill. These things are way more important in life than video games.
 
Jan 23, 2015
6,868
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I'm crying. What a beautiful letter.

I wish more developers actually put in an effort to make their games more accessible. Button mapping and subtitles for speech, music cues and sound effects should be standard by this point.

The fact that deaf gamers don't even have decent accommodations for gaming is whack as it is. I can't imagine how tough it must be for blind folks.
 

Cosmonaut X

Member
Jun 5, 2006
9,604
0
0
Scotland
Fantastic story - these kinds of gestures can make a huge difference to children, and they're always good to see.

Must admit that this was a little spooky though, given what happened to Yokoi:

The maintenance department, shocked at the abuse the handheld system had taken, called the boy’s mother to inquire about how it had ended up in such a state. She told them about the accident, and a few days later the boy received a new Game Boy, along with a note telling him to watch out for cars signed by “Yokoi,” ostensibly Game Boy designer Gunpei Yokoi.
 

Mael

Member
Oct 23, 2009
23,428
0
0
France
Woah that's all kinds of cool!

This dedication has been shown to extend all the way to the top at the company. In the early 1990s, an elementary school student was riding his bike when he was hit by a car. During his subsequent stay in the hospital, the boy wanted to play some games, but his Game Boy had been in the basket of his bike at the time of the accident, and was so damaged it had to be sent to Nintendo for repairs.

The maintenance department, shocked at the abuse the handheld system had taken, called the boy’s mother to inquire about how it had ended up in such a state.
Wait, you can break a gameboy?
She told them about the accident, and a few days later the boy received a new Game Boy, along with a note telling him to watch out for cars signed by “Yokoi,” ostensibly Game Boy designer Gunpei Yokoi.
-_-'
 

Peltz

Member
Apr 26, 2014
16,507
7
515
There was a story about how a blind person played 1-2-Switch with his or her family. I forgot the details but it was really heartwarming.
 

Kalor

Member
Oct 30, 2013
3,532
0
0
That's cool. Now they have to make more Rhythm Heaven so that they don't let them down.
 

psychowave

Member
Nov 7, 2016
1,576
0
220
This is why making games more accessible is so important. Everyone deserves to be able to just pick a game up and have fun, especially kids.

D'awwed out loud at the Uncle Miyamoto thing too.
 

AquaWateria

Member
Jan 14, 2014
9,550
1
0
The saddest part is that there are people that call themselves hardcore gamers are against games that are accessible to everyone because its too kiddy for their tastes.
 

Steiner

Banned
Sep 17, 2016
1,195
0
0
I love this. The Rhythm Heaven games are very near and dear to my heart -- the exemplify exactly what makes Nintendo so special, in my opinion. They're delightful, surprising, challenging, fun for friends to enjoy together, and the developers always go out of their way to make players smile. Rhythm Heaven Megamix is a masterpiece, and one of my top 5 GOAT on any platform.

Seeing Nintendo acknowledge this fan with their heartwarming response just makes me so happy. Everything about this series is magical. I'm genuinely happy for that boy, and I can't wait to see Rhythm Heaven on the Switch.
 

boiled goose

good with gravy
Oct 30, 2007
12,848
1
1,050
There are lots of possibilities of interesting games without visual input.

Hd rumble can provide haptic feedback.
 

Struct09

Member
Oct 9, 2006
14,355
0
0
That's awesome. And I can kind of relate, sometimes I do my best in Rhythm Heaven when I close my eyes.
 

City 17

Member
Apr 17, 2013
640
0
0
Try to be more careful, but since you're still in elementary school, I'm guessing you don't have much money to pay for repairs, so this time Uncle Miyamoto will take care of it for you
I think we found the guy whose uncle works for Nintendo.
 

DanteRavenkin

Member
May 28, 2011
791
0
0
Reading this story brought a smile to my face. I feel like, if any company can truly make games for everyone, it'll be Nintendo. Maybe they already have a team working on fully accessible games. If not, they probably will soon enough.
 
R

Rösti

Unconfirmed Member
“Putting Smiles on the Faces of Everyone Nintendo Touches.” exemplified really well. A very nice story.
 

PSqueak

Banned
Jan 31, 2015
14,163
1
0
it's funny too, given that i have read impressions of people saying a good bunch of the mini games in 1,2, switch! are very blind friendly, so that kid is getting more nintendo stuff he can play.