Oculus Rift CEO: High end Oculus Rift games could cost more than $60

#1
CEO Brendan Iribe would not be surprised to see Oculus games cost more than $60 - he also says "the age of 2D monitors has run its course". The Oculus Rift could open up new realms of immersion for gamers - but those experiences may come with a price.

Brendan Iribe, CEO of Oculus, notes that - as a hardware manufacturer - his business has no say in what software companies will charge for Oculus-enhanced games, but admits he would not be surprised to see them come at a premium price.

"It's going to be up to the developers," he says. "There will be some who make casual, simpler experiences - maybe bite sized. There are going to be Indie developers that make bigger experiences. And there are going to be bigger teams that make really big experiences. ... And some that we've seen early prototypes of... Well, we've seen some that, boy, would I pay a lot to get that experience in virtual reality."

Aaron Davies, director of developer relations at Oculus, agrees.

"In VR, suddenly objects have value - and scale and size and depth and I think there will be opportunities for developers to monetize them," he says.
Iribe noted that pricing in the game industry tends to swing. Prices spiked with the launch of the last generation consoles, then swung to the other end of the pendulum with the rise of mobile gaming. He sees the rise of virtual reality as not an extension of PC gaming, but something different - which opens the door for them to move back in the opposite direction.

"VR is a fundamentally different experience," he says. "This is the next generation of computing in a very big way. ... This is something that's going to change so many things."

However, he notes, raising prices also raises risk for developers.

"They'd better deliver if they're going to charge more than $50 or $60 for a game," he says.

Davies notes that the higher prices - if they come at all - may not be done in a clumsy fashion, such as hiking the initial retail price. Instead, he points to the free-to-play model, where microtransactions make it less painful to pay (and the customer may not realize they're paying more until much later).

"The whole concept of charging a premium is somewhat outdated," he says. "It's not to say it's going to be upfront. It could be this is going to be an experience you get dialed into. We'll see how it monetizes. ... If you create content or an experience that someone is passionate about, you're creating a lifestyle for them. And they'll pay for that."

"If people are willing to spend a lot of money on VR games, it obviously means we're doing something right," says Iribe.
Thanks, GI.Biz
 

Frumix

Suffering From Success
#4
"In VR, suddenly objects have value - and scale and size and depth and I think there will be opportunities for developers to monetize them," he says.
Depth DLC confirmed?
No, seriously, what?
 
#8
Its only one part of the VR experience though, until they can actually find a way to give objects weight in your hands, give you resistance when you are touching something, and remove the controller from the equation, its just another step that isn't going to massively change what the game is. I cant wait for the day when all this is possible.
 
#12
I don't really get the concept there...
I mean you could argue that vr oriented games will need to have more details etc.. but that's not like this is already the trend for fps games anyway..

And i'd say it's the contrary actually, a N64 game would look awesome and magic with the Oculus rift..
 
#13
Seems logical. The kind of audience who could afford an OC at launch will probably easily bite for some over-priced, OC-enabled games. Young adults, without children, with lots of income, etc.
 
#15
Wow. Free-to-play speak already? And micro-transactions? Nothing like shooting yourself in the foot before you've even had a chance to walk out the door. Not saying it's necessarily a sign of instant failure, but that's gotta leave a bad taste in your mouth.
 
#16
Expected to be honest, making bespoke games for bespoke hardware is never cheap. Add to that a very niche and small install base then the costs have to be re-couped somewhere else.

This isn't the case for normal Indie games with Rift support ported in (so don't expect 90% of Rift games to be the same price as games are today) but for bespoke games made just for that hardware will need some sort of return on the product.
 
#20
"In VR, suddenly objects have value - and scale and size and depth and I think there will be opportunities for developers to monetize them,"
So, because you can now see the same objects in real 3d, they somehow should cost more? Only your perspective changes, they have been rendering them in 3d for a while now you know...
 
#21
Eh... there has been previous generational leaps in graphics and in game complexity, and prices have stayed more or less the same. Not reason to believe this time will be different. Could be, but that has been always the case.
 

Currygan

at last, for christ's sake
#22
Requires premium hardware to play premium priced games. This is probably more than three years off from the mainstream at this point.
more like five years minimum....heck, the BR format is almost a decade old and it hasn't become mainstream yet


but I'm sure they know this very well; OR is a super niche product for a very very small audience
 
#23
Seems logical. The kind of audience who could afford an OC at launch will probably easily bite for some over-priced, OC-enabled games. Young adults, without children, with lots of income, etc.

Why nickel and dime people willing to pay for a premium product? I don't see the logic. This isn't a take anywhere pull out when you're bored device.
 
#25
Eh... there has been previous generational leaps in graphics and in game complexity, and prices have stayed more or less the same. Not reason to believe this time will be different. Could be, but that has been always the case.
Not really, companies have just been repackaging the costs to consumers. Instead of a retail price increase, its marketed as DLC, Season Passes, Microtransactions in retail games, etc.

We already get $50 "Season Passes" for the big games like BF4. It won't be long until a company straight out tries to sell a $60 season pass for a $60 retail video game.
 
#26
Games are going to get more expensive. They already are via hidden fees--DLC, map packs.

I expect 65 USD to become the standard next gen.

Heck games are actually cheaper if you count inflation, yet require way more labor than the 16 bit era.
 
#27
I don't see any reason why they'd cost more than current games. I wonder if Oculus can completely survive on the enthusiast market though. It's interesting but they need to think about how they make this viable to everyone else too.
 
#28
Hmmmmm, I think the attention and 'success' has begun to go his head. This statement is in complete contrast with his earlier goals of affordable and totally inexpensive VR.
 
#29
Best experience I've played on Oculus to date was Half Life 2.

I think this is just bigging it up, I don't think it's worth of a price premium if to be successful.

If anything I think it will be cheaper indies at first experimenting in the market.
 
#30
It's a helmet which shuts you of from the outside world. There is no mass market. Its awesome experience for a niche hardcore crowd. Thats it.
The console makers will be picking it up. At least Sony has had a lot of rumors flying around wanting to have something similar on the PS4. I'd put more money into this catching on than 3D TVs.
 
#31
I don't see any reason why they'd cost more than current games. I wonder if Oculus can completely survive on the enthusiast market though. It's interesting but they need to think about how they make this viable to everyone else too.
They have mobile aspiration as well.

I can see them being used in medical technology too.
 
#32
Sounds like the CEO was talking about microtransactions increasing the price.

Anyway without a doubt VR will catch on, both in gaming and other fields for training purposes.

And we all know that porno is going to be huge too. In any case there's a market for premium users as we can see from all the kickstarter games like Star Citizen. PC gaming community is the best
 
#37
The title seems a bit misleading. He says developers had better deliver if they decide to chafe more than 50 or 60 dollars for a game.
Yea, a little sensationalist. He really didn't say much of anything, but I guess we can expect this to get picked up on IGN and Polygon any minute now. :|
 
#39
He didn't really say anything, the title of this thread has shock value for no reason. His entire point was that they are making the hardware adn developers can charge whatever they want, just like they already can on PC and we don't see many actual PC games go more than $60.
 

RoboPlato

I'd be in the dick
#40
"In VR, suddenly objects have value - and scale and size and depth and I think there will be opportunities for developers to monetize them," he says.
Anyone who tries to argue that a simulation of depth gives the content more intrinsic monetary value is a real shitbag.
 
#41
He didn't really say anything, the title of this thread has shock value for no reason. His entire point was that they are making the hardware adn developers can charge whatever they want, just like they already can on PC and we don't see many actual PC games go more than $60.
Yep. Terrible terrible title. Worse than the source as well.

Gotta get those clicks!
 
#42
Would like to know what the situation is with the Rift vs 3D when it comes to people that cannot use the latter.

Probably half the people I have shown 3D to on my TV, have an issue with the way it is produced giving them a headache or eye strain. I want to know what happens with these people on the Rift.

Does it produce the same discomfort for them?
 
#44
Would like to know what the situation is with the Rift vs 3D when it comes to people that cannot use the latter.

Probably half the people I have shown 3D to on my TV, have an issue with the way it is produced giving them a headache or eye strain. I want to know what happens with these people on the Rift.

Does it produce the same discomfort for them?
Rift shows you a different image on a seperate screen for a each eye
there is no crosstalk or lowered brightness like in tv /cinema 3d
If you have depth perception irl you can see this type of 3d
 
#45
If only x number of people want Rift support in a game, and it would cost the company y dollars to implement this feature, I probably wouldn't mind spending the extra y/x (if < €15) for a VR mode dlc
 
#47
3D objects will have more end user value in VR... don't know if that means they can charge more for it.

And it'll have even more value when you get full body motion control in there.

Suddenly digital 3D objects can be toys... they can be sculptures to admire.

But you know... 3D objects will still be in a sense immaterial things copied easily...

So the market will bear what it'll bear - and developers will try to discover that price point through many experiments, even while gamers grit their teeth in chagrin.
 

Des0lar

will learn eventually
#49
So how many people were reading the OP here?

First he explicitly said that they, of course, have no say in the pricing of games.

And he also said himself "if they charge more, they have to deliver", which I think everyone can agree on.

Cue 5 more pages of people calling the VR revolution a fad/ "like 3D" .... and all that jazz
 
#50
So, because you can now see the same objects in real 3d, they somehow should cost more? Only your perspective changes, they have been rendering them in 3d for a while now you know...
Exactly. I don't see what justification there could possibly be for up-charging Rift games.

Your game has really great OR support? It sells more copies. There's your reward.