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PAX uninvites Colin Moriarty (PAX refuses refunds, Colin to refund 20 people out of own pocket)

SpiceRacz

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And there's 1,000s of those same crazy lunatics on the right also. Just go to Jemele Hill's Twitter page and you'll see 100s of them per day. This is something that us 21st Century, 1st world people will have to understand going forward. A few years back many of them considered themselves to be part of the "Tea Party". They swore Obama was born in Africa and that he was a Muslim and was against most slightly right leaning policies. Now that Trump is in office, you're seeing it from the exact opposite side where you see the craziest 20% of the left attacking people for things that are central-left policies and beliefs.

Every 5-10 years you'll see the pendulum swing back and forth with whose more aggressive.

I understand your point, but you're lying to yourself if you think that sort crazy behavior is just as prevalent on the right.
 

mckmas8808

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I understand your point, but you're lying to yourself if you think that sort crazy behavior is just as prevalent on the right.
I lived through the Tea Party era. I was online all the time. I saw the crazies. For me this isn't an "Us vs. Them" discussion. I'm not on a team per se. I'm not trying to make the extreme right look worse than the extreme left. I just recognize it when both sides do it.

The biggest issue that's happened that I paid close attention to was the Colin Kaepernick situation when the extreme right (with the help of President Trump) were acting as if he was unAmerican for seating down or taking a knee during the national anthem. Many said he should be banned from ever playing football (they won that part of the dissussion because Colin can't even get a workout for a NFL team anymore).

The extreme right said the NFL should change their rules (without consulting the NFL's players union) to make it illegal to kneel during the playing of the national anthem. Like that, all happened nationally. And it was only a couple of years ago.
 

SpiceRacz

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I lived through the Tea Party era. I was online all the time. I saw the crazies. For me this isn't an "Us vs. Them" discussion. I'm not on a team per se. I'm not trying to make the extreme right look worse than the extreme left. I just recognize it when both sides do it.

The biggest issue that's happened that I paid close attention to was the Colin Kaepernick situation when the extreme right (with the help of President Trump) were acting as if he was unAmerican for seating down or taking a knee during the national anthem. Many said he should be banned from ever playing football (they won that part of the dissussion because Colin can't even get a workout for a NFL team anymore).

The extreme right said the NFL should change their rules (without consulting the NFL's players union) to make it illegal to kneel during the playing of the national anthem. Like that, all happened nationally. And it was only a couple of years ago.
There's more to that story, but you're pointing to something that happened years ago while I can point to stuff that's happened within the past week.
 

NickFire

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I lived through the Tea Party era. I was online all the time. I saw the crazies. For me this isn't an "Us vs. Them" discussion. I'm not on a team per se. I'm not trying to make the extreme right look worse than the extreme left. I just recognize it when both sides do it.

The biggest issue that's happened that I paid close attention to was the Colin Kaepernick situation when the extreme right (with the help of President Trump) were acting as if he was unAmerican for seating down or taking a knee during the national anthem. Many said he should be banned from ever playing football (they won that part of the dissussion because Colin can't even get a workout for a NFL team anymore).

The extreme right said the NFL should change their rules (without consulting the NFL's players union) to make it illegal to kneel during the playing of the national anthem. Like that, all happened nationally. And it was only a couple of years ago.
People do not fall into the "extreme right" camp for believing he disrespected the flag. People also do not fall into the "extreme left" camp for believing he did not disrespect the flag. The flag is a symbolic representation of the nation, and people's feelings in either direction on the issue do no make them extreme.

Further, CK knowingly and intentionally started the debate by taking the knee in the most public way possible. So in what possible way is he similar to the guy who told a joke that resonates with virtually every PERSON at some point (partner away, oh blessed peace and quiet)?
 

mckmas8808

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People do not fall into the "extreme right" camp for believing he disrespected the flag. People also do not fall into the "extreme left" camp for believing he did not disrespect the flag. The flag is a symbolic representation of the nation, and people's feelings in either direction on the issue do no make them extreme.

Further, CK knowingly and intentionally started the debate by taking the knee in the most public way possible. So in what possible way is he similar to the guy who told a joke that resonates with virtually every PERSON at some point (partner away, oh blessed peace and quiet)?
- Saying someone should be fired from their job for not standing for the national anthem is extremist. It's the opposite of what America is "supposed to" stand for.

- Plus CK at first was seating during the national anthem for weeks before anybody noticed. He never said anything, until one reporter decided to ask him why he wasn't standing. It was only then when he decided to tell the world his personal issues with the state of America. And he's similar to Colin Moriatry because (wow just noticed we are talking about two Colins lol) because Colin is a public figure, that said what he said in a public forum. I don't personally have beef with either guy doing or saying what they said by the way.

You sure don't recognize when you do it.
I've done it in the past (say 3 years ago or more). I've learned from the error of my ways. Growth is good.
 

Jon Neu

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Jan 21, 2018
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No one "deserves" to have his or her career ruined. This is reactionary garbage - the same animus behind the HUAC, the Hollywood blacklist, etc. - disguised as progressive action.

If one commits a crime, like that slimeball producer, or is a serial predator, there are judicial avenues to be pursued. They are to be investigated, indicted and judged by their peers. If their guilt is to be proven beyond reasonable doubt, their liberty will be forfeited and they will serve their sentence. This is why we have a State, with police powers and the monopoly of force.

There's nothing more progressive than respect for individual freedom married to the rule of law. Anti-abortion fanatics can picket Planned Parenthood, but they don't get to prevent women from having the procedure. Christian conservatives may think gays are degenerate, but they don't get to prevent LGBTQ people from making use of all the rights available to all Americans.

Conversely, opaque and diffuse mobs should not be able to harass a person's ability to earn their keep and threaten their livelihood. I know nothing about this gentleman, but a civilized and free society should not condone the ruination of someone's career over a bad joke or a terrible tweet.
Thank you for being the voice of reason. Sadly, SJW's are weaponizing "social shame" to literally ban people from society. The witch burnings of our era.
 
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48086

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And there's 1,000s of those same crazy lunatics on the right also. Just go to Jemele Hill's Twitter page and you'll see 100s of them per day. This is something that us 21st Century, 1st world people will have to understand going forward. A few years back many of them considered themselves to be part of the "Tea Party". They swore Obama was born in Africa and that he was a Muslim and was against most slightly right leaning policies. Now that Trump is in office, you're seeing it from the exact opposite side where you see the craziest 20% of the left attacking people for things that are central-left policies and beliefs.

Every 5-10 years you'll see the pendulum swing back and forth with whose more aggressive.
So you are saying people on the right claiming Obama was born in Africa is the same as people on the left doxing, social shaming, and physically harming those on the right? Wow.

- Saying someone should be fired from their job for not standing for the national anthem is extremist. It's the opposite of what America is "supposed to" stand for.
Ok, I guess you don't know why people stand for the flag.
 
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mckmas8808

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So you are saying people on the right claiming Obama was born in Africa is the same as people on the left doxing, social shaming, and physically harming those on the right? Wow.



Ok, I guess you don't know why people stand for the flag.

I'm claiming the people on the right claiming Obama was born in Africa and is a Muslim are just as bad (or similar to) the people social shaming and electronically abusing people like Colin Moriarty for his joke and politically stances. That's exactly how I feel.

And to your other point.....I understand why people stand for the flag. But not standing for the flag, doesn't undermine what the flag stands for. And if you are kneeling during the national anthem for a political reason, you're doing exactly what the American flag is "supposed to" represent.
 

iconmasterX

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The biggest issue that's happened that I paid close attention to was the Colin Kaepernick situation when the extreme right (with the help of President Trump) were acting as if he was unAmerican for seating down or taking a knee during the national anthem. Many said he should be banned from ever playing football (they won that part of the dissussion because Colin can't even get a workout for a NFL team anymore).
Take the president out of it for a moment: pro sports players are entertainers. If they piss off their adoring fans, there are going to be career consequences. IMO the result was just.
 

48086

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I'm claiming the people on the right claiming Obama was born in Africa and is a Muslim are just as bad (or similar to) the people social shaming and electronically abusing people like Colin Moriarty for his joke and politically stances. That's exactly how I feel.

And to your other point.....I understand why people stand for the flag. But not standing for the flag, doesn't undermine what the flag stands for. And if you are kneeling during the national anthem for a political reason, you're doing exactly what the American flag is "supposed to" represent.
People are threatening violence against Colin. People are excluding him because some of his political beliefs are different from the majority's political beliefs. If you seriously honestly think those things are equal to people simply claiming they believe Obama was born in Africa and is a Muslim than you need to get off the internet and do some introspection. I'm honestly shocked.

Also, standing for the American flag represents the acknowledgement of those who died for the country. Yeah, you are free to kneel but if you do you're a real asshole. Taking acknowledgement and respect away from the fallen in order to make some modern day political statement is nothing more than an arrogant narcissistic dick move. You're saying, "My opinion is literally more important than those who have died for this country."
 
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DragoonKain

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- Saying someone should be fired from their job for not standing for the national anthem is extremist. It's the opposite of what America is "supposed to" stand for.

- Plus CK at first was seating during the national anthem for weeks before anybody noticed. He never said anything, until one reporter decided to ask him why he wasn't standing. It was only then when he decided to tell the world his personal issues with the state of America. And he's similar to Colin Moriatry because (wow just noticed we are talking about two Colins lol) because Colin is a public figure, that said what he said in a public forum. I don't personally have beef with either guy doing or saying what they said by the way.



I've done it in the past (say 3 years ago or more). I've learned from the error of my ways. Growth is good.
I don't agree with the stance that someone should be forced to stand, although you are forced to stand in the NBA, just not sure how strongly it's enforced, but that doesn't make it extreme either. Some people are patriotic and feel very strongly about the flag. I'm not one of them, but I also didn't serve in the military, nor do I have a military family. I can understand why someone out there who does, would. That symbol means a lot to many people. Extreme would be threatening to kill him or violence against him. And those who did are extremists. But just pro flag people aren't.

A lot of people's issues with Kaepernick were not with the flag. A lot of people had issues with his false agenda toward cops. Law enforcement is the best it has ever been in the history of our nation and he is stewing dangerous, bad, and divisive rhetoric with his anti-cop propaganda. As if it wasn't bad enough. He might mean well, but it's the wrong way to go about it, it'll cause more harm than good. If the goal is to get LE and civilians closer and on the same page and help police be better at their jobs, that certainly is not a wise strategy.
 
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mckmas8808

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Take the president out of it for a moment: pro sports players are entertainers. If they piss off their adoring fans, there are going to be career consequences. IMO the result was just.
If that's the stakes, then can't we say the same thing about the other Colin (Moriarty)? He pissed off some video game fans too. Though, I thought NFL team's goal was to win games. And how many fans really wouldn't have shown up to games if Kaepernick was on the team?

People are threatening violence against Colin. People are excluding him because some of his political beliefs are different from the majority's political beliefs. If you seriously honestly think those things are equal to people simply claiming they believe Obama was born in Africa and is a Muslim than you need to get off the internet and do some introspection. I'm honestly shocked.

Also, standing for the American flag represents the acknowledgement of those who died for the country. Yeah, you are free to kneel but if you do you're a real asshole. Taking acknowledgement and respect away from the fallen in order to make some modern day political statement is nothing more than an arrogant narcissistic dick move. You're saying, "My opinion is literally more important than those who have died for this country."
- People also were threatening violence against Obama for being an African\Muslim President leading the country into disaster. Did you not see this online and through the media?
- Plus the national anthem isn't "solely" about those that died for this country. It's only apart of it. Plus there are many people that have died for this country's sake. Many of them never fought in a war, but believe protest is as important to American citizen's rights as free speech. Martin Luther King Jr was one of those people. He also died for this country. And he knew he was going to die fighting for the rights of American citizens. His death and others in that movement is just as important and soldiers that have died overseas fighting. And kneeling was and is not disrespectful. But I guess it can feel that way when you disagree with the person doing it.

I don't agree with the stance that someone should be forced to stand, although you are forced to stand in the NBA, just not sure how strongly it's enforced, but that doesn't make it extreme either. Some people are patriotic and feel very strongly about the flag. I'm not one of them, but I also didn't serve in the military, nor do I have a military family. I can understand why someone out there who does, would. That symbol means a lot to many people. Extreme would be threatening to kill him or violence against him. And those who did are extremists. But just pro flag people aren't.

A lot of people's issues with Kaepernick were not with the flag. A lot of people had issues with his false agenda toward cops. Law enforcement is the best it has ever been in the history of our nation and he is stewing dangerous, bad, and divisive rhetoric with his anti-cop propaganda. As if it wasn't bad enough. He might mean well, but it's the wrong way to go about it, it'll cause more harm than good. If the goal is to get LE and civilians closer and on the same page and help police be better at their jobs, that certainly is not a wise strategy.
- I'm actually a son of a Captain in the Army. My dad was 100% behind Kaepernick and his kneeling. His military friends were also okay with his kneeling during the national anthem. They served and/or fought for the right of US citizens to display this type action in America. What do people want us to be? North Korea? Not all vets are anti-kneeling during the national anthem. And being pro flag doesn't mean that you have to stand in front of it during the anthem. The men below were also pro flag.



- Plus we have a huge issue with law enforcement in America. To bring it back to video games, have you seen some of the swatting videos that are placed online? Swat teams just running up into homes based on some anonomous call from some prankers. Major cities all over America have been paying out $10s of millions of tax payer dollars every year due to wrongful deaths. It's a HUGE issue and it constantly needs to be addressed. Especially now since police have access to military equipment.
 
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DragoonKain

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If that's the stakes, then can't we say the same thing about the other Colin (Moriarty)? He pissed off some video game fans too. Though, I thought NFL team's goal was to win games. And how many fans really wouldn't have shown up to games if Kaepernick was on the team?



- People also were threatening violence against Obama for being an African\Muslim President leading the country into disaster. Did you not see this online and through the media?
- Plus the national anthem isn't "solely" about those that died for this country. It's only apart of it. Plus there are many people that have died for this country's sake. Many of them never fought in a war, but believe protest is as important to American citizen's rights as free speech. Martin Luther King Jr was one of those people. He also died for this country. And he knew he was going to die fighting for the rights of American citizens. His death and others in that movement is just as important and soldiers that have died overseas fighting. And kneeling was and is not disrespectful. But I guess it can feel that way when you disagree with the person doing it.



- I'm actually a son of a Captain in the Army. My dad was 100% behind Kaepernick and his kneeling. His military friends were also okay with his kneeling during the national anthem. They served and/or fought for the right of US citizens to display this type action in America. What do people want us to be? North Korea? Not all vets are anti-kneeling during the national anthem. And being pro flag doesn't mean that you have to stand in front of it during the anthem. The men below were also pro flag.



- Plus we have a huge issue with law enforcement in America. To bring it back to video games, have you seen some of the swatting videos that are placed online? Swat teams just running up into homes based on some anonomous call from some prankers. Major cities all over America have been paying out $10s of millions of tax payer dollars every year due to wrongful deaths. It's a HUGE issue and it constantly needs to be addressed. Especially now since police have access to military equipment.
People who want to support him can support him. People who don't like what he does have a right to not like it too. That's being American. Having the right to feel a certain way and not have to be guilted over it. This applies to both sides. People should have the right to feel what they feel.

We don't have a huge issue with LE in America. It's an issue, but not a huge one. Social media makes it out to be much worse than it is. Right now police are less racist, more careful, and more compassionate than they've ever been generally across the board. Does that mean it's perfect? No. But if we are being fair and reasonable, we should strive for perfection but demand progress. Right now we have gotten progress. And we'll continue to push for more. That's all we can do. I'm not sure what people think can be done realistically. Better training for officers? With what money? Departments are lacking funding as it is. Maybe some of these woke athletes should donate some of their millions to that if they want to make a difference. Less racism? We're getting there. It's a direct reflection on our society and every year we become more and more accepting of others.

I think you're confusing addressing issues with talking about it. Talk is cheap. We can talk about racism and bigotry and global starvation everyday until we're blue in the face, talk doesn't bring change. Action brings change. I see a lot of talk, not a lot of action. But LE is still making progress despite being in situation that is not ideal. And I'm not just talking funding or logistical means, I'm talking the horrors officers have to witness, develop PTSD, being literally changed forever as a human being and still have to be perfect, cool, and rational all the time or else they're viciously judged in the news by people who have no clue what they go through. It's easy to play armchair cop.
 

mckmas8808

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People who want to support him can support him. People who don't like what he does have a right to not like it too. That's being American. Having the right to feel a certain way and not have to be guilted over it. This applies to both sides. People should have the right to feel what they feel.

We don't have a huge issue with LE in America. It's an issue, but not a huge one. Social media makes it out to be much worse than it is. Right now police are less racist, more careful, and more compassionate than they've ever been generally across the board. Does that mean it's perfect? No. But if we are being fair and reasonable, we should strive for perfection but demand progress. Right now we have gotten progress. And we'll continue to push for more. That's all we can do. I'm not sure what people think can be done realistically. Better training for officers? With what money? Departments are lacking funding as it is. Maybe some of these woke athletes should donate some of their millions to that if they want to make a difference. Less racism? We're getting there. It's a direct reflection on our society and every year we become more and more accepting of others.

I think you're confusing addressing issues with talking about it. Talk is cheap. We can talk about racism and bigotry and global starvation everyday until we're blue in the face, talk doesn't bring change. Action brings change. I see a lot of talk, not a lot of action. But LE is still making progress despite being in situation that is not ideal. And I'm not just talking funding or logistical means, I'm talking the horrors officers have to witness, develop PTSD, being literally changed forever as a human being and still have to be perfect, cool, and rational all the time or else they're viciously judged in the news by people who have no clue what they go through. It's easy to play armchair cop.
Me and you perfectly agree with the bolded.

As to the athletes taking action. Many of them are. You just aren't seeing it on the news. Jay-Z just signed a deal with the NFL to bring action to their social justice cause. It's all happening, it's just not exciting for the news as people protesting and the cops with military gear on standing up against the protesters. Don't let the media fool you.

Plus if you think the cops in bad areas have PTSD and their lives are being changed forever, then best believe the citizens that live in those neighborhoods are going through the same things. And just as easy as it is to play armchair cop, it's equally as easy to play armchair citizen and say what you would have done to not make the cop abuse you.

To the 2nd bolded part.....you know what can be done realistically? When it comes to cops committing abusive acts amongst citizens.....they need to be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. Not just suspended. If a cop goes against his or her training and abuses a citizen, not only should they be fired but they should also be charged with aggravated assault (or manslaughter if the citizen was shot and killed unreasonably).
 

DragoonKain

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Me and you perfectly agree with the bolded.

As to the athletes taking action. Many of them are. You just aren't seeing it on the news. Jay-Z just signed a deal with the NFL to bring action to their social justice cause. It's all happening, it's just not exciting for the news as people protesting and the cops with military gear on standing up against the protesters. Don't let the media fool you.

Plus if you think the cops in bad areas have PTSD and their lives are being changed forever, then best believe the citizens that live in those neighborhoods are going through the same things. And just as easy as it is to play armchair cop, it's equally as easy to play armchair citizen and say what you would have done to not make the cop abuse you.

To the 2nd bolded part.....you know what can be done realistically? When it comes to cops committing abusive acts amongst citizens.....they need to be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. Not just suspended. If a cop goes against his or her training and abuses a citizen, not only should they be fired but they should also be charged with aggravated assault (or manslaughter if the citizen was shot and killed unreasonably).
No, the citizens in those neighborhoods aren’t going through the same things. Not the same things. Some civilians who had really bad experiences with cops may have PTSD, and I feel sorry if they do, but they don’t see the same things officers are exposed to. Our cops are exposed to the worst of the worst. Dead bodies, mutilations of dead bodies like decapitations, etc, bloody crime scenes, the smell of rotting corpses, awful stuff done to children, sexual assault cases, kidnappings, the worst depravity of mankind, etc. This is what they’re exposed to everyday, stuff us civilians aren’t. Some everyday regular people are traumatized for freaking life if they see a dead body and need counseling, even if the dead body is someone they didn’t know. Cops are exposed to this as many times as the job calls for. You could see something awful once in your career, and you could see it dozens and dozens of times. No amount of training or anything prepares you for that. You can’t scrub that shit from your brain. And the stuff the job calls for you to do. Sometimes to have to take a life if the job calls for it, that’s stuff many cops can never get over.

I think if civilians were educated to what cops go through we’d be more appreciative and less anti cop, and I think civilians “know” but they don’t really know what they go through.

I think if cops violate the oath they pledge when they become an officer they definitely should be prosecuted. The problem is there’s a lot of grey area unfortunately, it has to be taken on a case by case basis. If a cop pulls over someone and then asks for his license and registration and the cop attacks the guy for no reason even if he followed exactly what the officer said, then yes, a scenario like that he should be prosecuted. But in many situations the cop asks for something that the civilian deems unreasonable and then the civilian doesn’t obey the cop’s orders. Which I honestly can’t blame the civilian, but still, that’s only going to put yourself in danger. You can’t get inside the mind of the cop and know why they consider you a potential threat. Now, it may be racism or something, but it also may not, we just don’t know. Maybe a nearby bank was robbed and a suspect resembling their description was called over, and the cop thinks this may be the guy, stops him, the civilian thinks he’s being profiled, doesn’t obey the orders, resists arrest or reaches in his jacket and ends up being shot. Now if someone recording that on their iPhone puts it online, to an observer it may look awful, but we don’t know the whole story. That’s why social media exposing this stuff can be good, but also can be bad it depends on the incident and what happened.
 
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