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[PC Gamer] Why 2021 was the worst year for PC gaming

Topher

Gold Member
When we were naively previewing 2021, still in the warm afterglow of the impressive GeForce RTX 3080 and Radeon RX 6800 XT launches, this year looked like it was to be the year of affordable PC gaming hardware. A golden year for bargain rigs, and one in the eye for the latest consoles. As it turned out, 2021 was the worst year for PC gaming. Why? Because the heartsblood of the hobby, the mainstream and budget market, has been summarily executed.

PC gaming means different things to different people, and that alone plays into what is so good about the hobby, and why no other platform can match it. On the one hand you have the, admittedly sometimes elitist, early adopters with cash to burn; those who will drop a grand on a new component as soon as it's launched simply so they can lay claim to having the latest and greatest rig known to humankind.

And that's awesome. The sheer power growling away inside the highest performance gaming PC will always be unmatched by anything our console cousins could dream of. And the scalability of PC games means the big titles will look their absolute best on our rigs when pushed to their full potential.

But it's precisely that scalability that adds to what makes PC gaming truly special to me. Because on the other hand you have the budget builders, the dedicated gamers working hard to squeeze as much performance out of the most affordable parts on those exact same games.

When you've got a fat wallet it's easy to nail 4K gaming at silky smooth frame rates, but when you're working to a real tight budget you've got to put in the hours researching parts, compromising on some, and finally optimising the hell out of your games and your system. It's a challenge, but a hugely rewarding one, especially when you could often end up with a budget gaming PC that delivers frame rates to make an Xbox One blush.

That's how it's been in the past, and as a general rule I'd say going into the second year of a new console generation you could expect to put together a gaming PC for the same cash, with equal or better performance, compared with a current-gen gamebox. Prices go down, and new mainstream and budget parts get released to make that PC build job easier.

Not with this generation, not with the Series X or PS5. If you want 4K gaming at $500 that's still where the smart money goes.

In this, the darkest possible timeline, there's no financial imperative to 'waste' production capacity on cheaper products

Since demand started to ramp up for components and PCs in general, in 2020, that trend has continued into this year, and looks set to be the new normal throughout 2022—maybe into 2023 as well. Combined with finite manufacturing capacity, disruption to the supply chain, and the inexorable rise of cryptocurrency—again—, it has meant key components, such as graphics cards, are out of stock the instant they're released, and subsequently rare as donkey eggs.

That then becomes fertile ground for bots and ebay resellers slapping hugely inflated price tags on our favourite components, which has made it a nightmare trying to upgrade or build a new PC over the last couple of years.

That's all common knowledge, and you're likely living that pain as a PC gamer yourself right now. But a lesser mentioned side effect of the chip shortage, sky-high demand, and the brutally incessant pandemic, is the impact it's had on the choices manufacturers have made about what they produce, and what their product lines actually look like.

When everything you make sells out the instant you ship it, and you only have finite manufacturing capacity and chip supply, there is little incentive to create cheaper, traditionally high-volume products. If you sell as many $1,000 GPUs as your $400 options, why would you dip any lower down the potential performance stack?

Normally we'd have seen sub-$200 cards for budget gamers by now, those taking the latest architecture, with a few nips and tucks here and there, delivering impressive bang for buck. But the maths no longer adds up. The traditional understanding is that you make a lot of $200 GPUs, aiming to sell a whole load of them because you'll sell fewer higher priced options. But in this, the darkest possible timeline, there's no financial imperative to 'waste' production capacity on cheaper products when you could make the same number of more expensive chips and still sell the same number, but with a far higher return.

The fact it's economically understandable doesn't make it any less saddening or maddening. Capitalism, she is a harsh mistress.

And if you want some raw numbers to back that up: a year or so after the GeForce RTX 2080 launched Nvidia had released five sub-$300 GPUs, each a step up over their relevant forebears. You could even make that six if you counted the price drop to $299 for the RTX 2060 at the beginning of 2020.

On the AMD side, partly due to a lower flagship price, it had released seven of its own sub-$300 GPUs in the year after it released the Radeon RX 5700 XT, if you count the various OEM versions of its first-gen RDNA cards, that is.

And where does the number stand a year or so after the launch of the GeForce RTX 3080 and Radeon RX 6800 XT? At a big fat zero. Nada. Zilch. There are no sub-$300 GPUs in this generation.

And there's no alternative either. The crypto mining boom-bust-boom cycle has resulted in literally any GPU being picked up by enterprising ethereum diggers, and that means the budget gamer's last resort, ebay, is a barren wasteland when it comes to affordable last-gen graphics cards, too.

This makes it all but impossible to build a budget gaming rig worth a damn. Is there any hope on the horizon? Well, yes. Though let me just leave a quiet 'potentially' hanging in the air...

There is the potential for a budget gaming renaissance in 2022

There may yet be new Nvidia and AMD GPUs launched in the coming year with lower price tags and actual availability, and Intel will finally be joining the race with its own range of discrete GPUs as well. That will give us three chances at affordable, competitive graphics cards, and with SSD prices going down, DDR4 being well-priced right now, and Intel's budget CPUs being outstanding value, there is very much the potential for a budget gaming renaissance in 2022.


With CES rolling around in January, traditionally where AMD likes to talk about mobile chips and new APUs, there are rumours of a Rembrandt APU design sporting RDNA 2 GPU cores. That could deliver low-cost setups which don't need a discrete graphics card to be able to deliver 1080p gaming performance, offering another affordable route into the hobby.

We've also got the Steam Deck in the pipe to release in February, with a console-level price point, and the potential for both handheld and docked PC gaming from a SteamOS-based system.

While these plans could salve our budget PC gaming woes, there is still the very real spectre of the supply shortage. The Steam Deck has already been delayed from a December launch to February, with Valve citing "global supply chain issues" as the reason. Initial stock has already been taken up, too, so if you haven't already bought a ticket to the Deck launch day funtimes you're not going to be bagging yourself the Steamy handheld anytime soon.

And whether we're talking GPU or APU, AMD is still utterly reliant on TSMC for its manufacturing (as is Valve thanks to using an AMD APU in the Deck itself) which means that it's fighting with almost every other company on the planet for chip fabrication capacity from the Taiwanese foundry. That means finite supply, which will mean figuring out how to manage those cheaper components alongside its higher-end GPUs and CPUs, as well as all the chips AMD needs to have made to supply both Sony and Microsoft for the PS5 and Xbox Series X/S consoles.

Despite its own broad manufacturing capabilities, Intel, too, is employing the contract manufacturing services of TSMC for its upcoming range of Xe-based Alchemist graphics cards.

That's a multi-manufacturer juggling act which could end up with the blue and red teams delivering theoretically fantastic budget graphics cards and APUs, but without the volume for any of it to matter.

Then there's Nvidia, which isn't beholden to TSMC, but to Samsung's manufacturing efforts. To now, that has anecdotally meant you're more likely to be able to track down a new GeForce GPU in the wild than an AMD one, and the same could ring true for the budget cards, too. Though supply will still be tight, and it will continue to be a battle to find one at MSRP throughout 2022.

So there is faint hope for a return of the budget gaming PC market with the potential for key components with reasonable price tags in the future. And that's vital because it's not just about the ultra-enthusiast world of monster rigs, PC gaming is inclusive. It's about giving everyone with a PC the chance to be involved in the hobby, whether they want to play Warzone or Wildermyth, whether they can afford to spend $1,000 on a graphics card every 12 months or they have to agonise over whether they can drop $50 on a new gaming headset.

I've certainly derived far more pleasure from carefully calculating and building a budget rig that punches above its weight class, than from slapping together a few high-powered parts and calling it a day. And I'm desperate for a return to the days when that will be possible again.

Hope he is right that 2022 could see more pricing options. A bit depressing when I look at the Nvidia GPU shop page and realize how out of whack actual GPU pricing is versus what it should/could be.
 

Reallink

Member
Again, doesn't seem to be affecting the market in any tangible way. I've seen no word of PC game, peripheral, or supporting part sales tanking so clearly more than enough people have the money to pay whatever GPU vendors ask. Those who have allegedly been priced out of the mid or low range markets apparently don't buy enough PC games, peripherals, or parts to matter. With everyone now making $15 - $20 an hour in the lowest Fast Food/Retail positions, perhaps we need to come to terms with the fact that $600 really is the new "budget" GPU.
 
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kyliethicc

Member
I would argue 2017 was the worst year ever for PC gaming.


...


Unrelated, but side note:

 

Great Hair

Banned
Get a console already, is more convenient. Cheaper and CO2 friendlier. Requires less space and you get a free bluray drive with it. No need to buy a key anymore for your annual powerdvd player.

You lot with your fat sausage fingers can´t build PCs anymore. Why even bother. Who wants that? First stage arthritis aint fun man. Always having to go under the table, all covered in spiderwebs and other shit ...


Computer Delete GIF
 

Laptop1991

Member
i agree with PC gamer, i bought no new games released this year, only the Skyrim upgrade and then there is the high prices of the GPU's,, that doesn't help PC gaming in the slightest, in fact it's the 1st year ever i haven't bought a single new game.
 

Orta

console wars 2020 - participant
Get a console already, is more convenient. Cheaper and CO2 friendlier. Requires less space and you get a free bluray drive with it. No need to buy a key anymore for your annual powerdvd player.

You lot with your fat sausage fingers can´t build PCs anymore. Why even bother. Who wants that? First stage arthritis aint fun man. Always having to go under the table, all covered in spiderwebs and other shit ...


Computer Delete GIF

Well if that isn't the strongest argument I've ever heard for ditching a pc in favour of a console.....
 

nemiroff

Gold Member
i agree with PC gamer, i bought no new games released this year

I don't get it. What does this have to do with the article? I mean, I'm reading on my phone so maybe I missed it, but I don't see anything relevant to your personal games buying habits. I'd say the PC library was no less diverse or of lesser quality than usual, arguably quite on the contrary to your notion.
 
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ParaSeoul

Member
"And there's no alternative either. The crypto mining boom-bust-boom cycle has resulted in literally any GPU being picked up by enterprising ethereum diggers, and that means the budget gamer's last resort, ebay, is a barren wasteland when it comes to affordable last-gen graphics cards, too"

Buying used GPUs is also a gamble because you don't know if it was running overclocked in some miners rig 24/7 for a year
 
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Laptop1991

Member
I don't get it. What does this have to do with the article? I mean, I'm reading on my phone so maybe I missed it, but I don't see anything relevant to your personal games buying habits. I'd say the PC library was no less diverse or of lesser quality than usual, arguably quite on the contrary to your notion.

I'm agreeing with the headline, does it matter, it's only an opinion.
 
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Zathalus

Member
PC will always be an afterthought. Only reasons you see certain publishers getting into porting to PC is for the very few areas where consoles aren't the dominate ones in the market.
By 'certain publishers' do you basically mean all of them? As it is quite easy for a good PC release to sell a few million copies. Which is obvious as Steam has over 120 million active users.
 

Lanrutcon

Member
GPU prices are going to be an issue that we'll only know the full extent of in a few years time.

Here we are, with everyone is porting their shit to PCs...and getting an actual GPU to run the newest games is turning into a niche affair. What's going to happen when those ports don't sell well because people can't play them? or they get killed in reviews because they run like shit on anything but the cards people can't get? The ports will stop, that's what.
 

Merkades

Member
I don't really disagree. I paid ~$500 extra to scalpers without including a GPU just for my parts for my new build last year. I was totally unable to get a GPU at a price I was willing to pay, and even the queue at EVGA was turned off so I just used my old 1060. Last night my coworker messaged me that he got a 3080ti and offered to sell me his 2080ti for $500 so I took him up on that, later today I will see about grabbing that and then I will just wait for the 5000 series (or equivalents if I like their offerings).

It took my coworker and another of his friends trying for a decent bit to actually get the card (it was his friend who succeeded).

Anyways, interesting stuff about the budget cards, makes sense when you think about it.
 

Dr.D00p

Member
The author clearly doesn't remember the truly dark age of PC gaming, the Xbox 360 & PS3 era, when all the big franchies that used to be PC only, transitioned over to console and the PC was basically ignored and got little more than appalling shovelware ports of console exclusives...
 

Guilty_AI

Member
The price and availability sucks, but worst year? Not even close. As the guy above said, there were times where pc market was severely starved for content and was generally looked on by publishers as a sea of piracy. Even long time pc devs like epic were abandoning pc for consoles.

PC gaming right now has no shortage of content, and keeps growing regardless of gpu prices.
 

PaintTinJr

Member

Hope he is right that 2022 could see more pricing options. A bit depressing when I look at the Nvidia GPU shop page and realize how out of whack actual GPU pricing is versus what it should/could be.
That feels like a pretty decent take on where the market is at the moment, and is good food for thought about how the main players will act going forward.

Giving it some more thought since the other 'can PC gaming survive ?' thread, and thinking about PCgamer's take on more APU and laptops filling the shortage, I'm wondering how far Intel are prepared to go to avoiding losing entire product tiers from their CPU market - and CPU chipsets - if entry-level RT discrete GPUs remain too high to maintain people updating their PC foundations at previous rates.

If you are Samsung (or other GPU memory mfrs) or Intel and watching Nvidia overplay(?) their long held PC king maker position by adding massive margin to their GPUs, what would you be prepared to do?
I'm wondering if Intel might use their CPU and chipset market position to refactor the problem, by decomposing the discrete aspect of a GPU into discrete GPU memory - that can be re-used across GPU upgrades - and a discrete GPU chip like the old math's co-processor setup with a second socket and heatsink/fan on the motherboard or on a expansion card on the PCIe bus, backed by edram like the X1console design, and opening out more budget options using just normal RAM too.

Motherboard mfrs would probably like such a solution and AMD would probably follow suit and get more capacity as a result of just needing to produce a GPU chip, instead of a whole card.

A solution like that would probably cost some performance, but would also make it easier for an IO complex like solution to be added to motherboards without a discrete RTX IO card solution. And nvidia would potentially be the only loser, as without a hand in the desktop CPU market their margin would potentially be lost to GPU memory module makers and motherboard mfrs. Either way I expect a left-of-field solution from somewhere
 

Thaedolus

Gold Member
Yeah this is hyperbolic. It’s shitty from a bleeding edge hardware perspective, but with what MS did with gamepass? I gamed more on PC this year than the last few I’m sure, and even my 5 year old PC with a 1080ti can handle the latest games at 1440p just fine, though I don’t have ray tracing…but it’s not like that’s an essential feature.

I’m super excited for a Steamdeck this year and it’s not like that’s going to put any high end rigs to shame. PC gaming is great if you’re not trying to have a dick measuring contest
 
The author clearly doesn't remember the truly dark age of PC gaming, the Xbox 360 & PS3 era, when all the big franchies that used to be PC only, transitioned over to console and the PC was basically ignored and got little more than appalling shovelware ports of console exclusives...

It's a title solely constructed for clickbait, not even the content the author has written there has any sort of sense to correlate with 2021 being the "WoRsT YeAr f0r PC GAMING". Here's the bullet points of what the author is talking about, because i can relate to the fact that the article itself is boring as fuck to read in its entirety:

  • No budget cards released at the moment for gamers on a budget.
  • In the second year of a console generation one should expect to put together a gaming PC for the same cash, with equal or better performance, compared with a current-gen gamebox.
  • Higher demands as of 2020 which ramped up in 2021, may get even higher in 2022 / Companies having issues keeping up with manufacturing.
  • Resellers may inflate prices on cards / Crypto miners snatching every card under the sun.
And the author ends the article on a good note:

[...] There is the potential for a budget gaming renaissance in 2022. There may yet be new Nvidia and AMD GPUs launched in the coming year with lower price tags and actual availability, and Intel will finally be joining the race with its own range of discrete GPUs as well. That will give us three chances at affordable, competitive graphics cards, and with SSD prices going down, DDR4 being well-priced right now, and Intel's budget CPUs being outstanding value, there is very much the potential for a budget gaming renaissance in 2022. [...]

[...] So there is faint hope for a return of the budget gaming PC market with the potential for key components with reasonable price tags in the future. And that's vital because it's not just about the ultra-enthusiast world of monster rigs, PC gaming is inclusive. [...]

Whatever.
 

Chukhopops

Member
I actually like that situation because it slows down the cycle of having to constantly upgrade your stuff because no one cares about making games work on older configurations. I have a 2060 I bought almost three years ago now and it’s completely fine for 1440p (plus to be fair I play mostly 4X stuff).

When the most popular card on Steam is still a 1060 with 8GB it forces devs to think a bit harder about optimisation.
 

Lanrutcon

Member
They are selling well tho, so...

GPU prices are going to be an issue that we'll only know the full extent of in a few years time.

Here we are, with everyone is porting their shit to PCs...and getting an actual GPU to run the newest games is turning into a niche affair. What's going to happen when those ports don't sell well because people can't play them? or they get killed in reviews because they run like shit on anything but the cards people can't get? The ports will stop, that's what.
 
You must be ancient.

If the ports don't sell then we'll stop getting them. This is pretty obvious.

Your opinion is very generalized and pessimistic, if some ports don't sell well because they run like shit on anything but the highest-end cards, then the ports themselves are shit and not worth buying. Why would anyone buy such ridiculously unoptimized ports? And why would anyone support such an obviously non-sustainable practice? Ports like these are more exceptions to the rule of thumb and there will never be a future were ports cease just because of this sole issue. Also, it depends on how shit they actually run and how well they have been marketed to the mass public, because there are plenty of examples of video games which i would describe as running as shit but still sold well. Depends on the quality of the port, who is making it, what are the expected sales to turn a profit, how big of a profit it needs to be to greenlight another port.

Have you watched Dallas?
 

Lanrutcon

Member
Your opinion is very generalized and pessimistic, if some ports don't sell well because they run like shit on anything but the highest-end cards, then the ports themselves are shit and not worth buying.

Stopped reading there, because that's not what I said.

If you want an argument, go talk to your nurse. If you want a conversation, read what I wrote.
 

STARSBarry

Gold Member
Until crypto tanks this is how its going to be.

Remember how Valve where experimenting with the steam boxes awhile back? I think those out the factory PC's is the potential solution to this... although I could see them being snapped up by the miners anyway.
 
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Stopped reading there, because that's not what I said.

If you want an argument, go talk to your nurse. If you want a conversation, read what I wrote.

No, i'm bored, and i have read what you wrote before i posted. You wish you had my nurse.

Here's what you wrote:
What's going to happen when those ports don't sell well or get killed in reviews because they run like shit on anything but the cards people can't get?
The ports will stop, that's what.

Stopped reading there, because that's not what I said.

Obviously, that's my opinion. Like i said, if some ports don't sell well because they run like shit on anything but the highest-end cards, then the ports themselves are shit and not worth buying.

So i disagree with your pessimism. If you had something else in mind wen you wrote that post then learn to properly convey in words what the fuck is on your mind haha.

You've never watched Dallas, have you?
 

Lanrutcon

Member
Like i said, if some ports don't sell well because they run like shit on anything but the highest-end cards, then the ports themselves are shit and not worth buying.

Ah, gotcha. You weren't saying I said that.

Like, I agree but if you look at it from the publisher/dev perspective then if something doesn't sell well (even if it's shit), then they take note and make changes. If Uncharted 4 (it's coming to PC, I think?) sells like shit (crap port or not) we'll probably never see the rest. I hope they sell well. All of them, crap or not, just so that we see more console games (I want HZD 2 on Steam eventually!). But to get back to my original point: if our GPU situation gets so bad that we can't even run the latest ports in a mediocre way, I think that the sales will suffer and there might be consequences to that.

Dallas was a bit before my time. I recognized the hat more than the actor/character under it.
 

Maiden Voyage

Gold™ Member
Get a console already, is more convenient. Cheaper and CO2 friendlier. Requires less space and you get a free bluray drive with it. No need to buy a key anymore for your annual powerdvd player.

You lot with your fat sausage fingers can´t build PCs anymore. Why even bother. Who wants that? First stage arthritis aint fun man. Always having to go under the table, all covered in spiderwebs and other shit ...


Computer Delete GIF
Sad No Way GIF by Sixt
 

BennyBlanco

aka IMurRIVAL69
if we're going by the logic that this was the worst year for PC gaming because you can't get the hardware at MSRP then it was the worst year for consoles too

meanwhile steam keeps breaking it's own concurrent user records and we got brilliant games like aoe4 and inscryption
 
I agree that 2021 was a bad year for PC gaming due to the high prices of the GPUs and scarcity of stock plus an alarming number of poorly optimised game releases from major publishers such as Capcom with Resident Evil Village (which took them *months* to fix at which point I had already finished the game), Square-Enix, UbiSoft and EA among others.

It's the reason why I opted to buy an Xbox Series X late last year to supplement my PS5 from 2020 for current generation games. I suspect that my PC will be used for games less and less over the next few years and that I will correspondingly buy fewer games (since my hardware is very old now although it can still manage most current games at 60 fps and High 1440p settings). I will return to the PC in the future though when GPU prices have stabilised and I can actually buy the cards for their recommended retail prices.
 

Midn1ght

Member
if we're going by the logic that this was the worst year for PC gaming because you can't get the hardware at MSRP then it was the worst year for consoles too

meanwhile steam keeps breaking it's own concurrent user records and we got brilliant games like aoe4 and inscryption
Here in EU, If you're lucky to find one, consoles are at MSRP when available in stores.

GPU are automatically 300- 400 - 500 above recommended price in stores. It sucks!
Only founder Edition are MSRP and they're impossible to get.

Worst year for PC, Nah... but I'm curious to see what will happen in the future, people will want to upgrade their 1060 at some point.
 

Kenpachii

Gold Member
Overly negative article that obviously was builded around GPU prices. Meanwhile in the reality PC gaming has been absolute fantastic and actually better then ever.

- Lots of cheap hardware to buy from cpu's to memory, to ssd's to monitors etc etc. Only GPU's are the issue's and that's about it will go back on that a bit later
- NIS introduced and FSR which pushes older generation cards to a next dimension when it comes to performance
- DLSS improvements for people that have more modern gpu's.
- All switch games are playable on even potato pc's which means entire library of Nintendo is now playable on PC.
- Sony games are coming and already hitting PC and run on potato systems perfectly fine
- All microsoft are playable on PC some even free on and on steam
- Gamepass for PC, twitch prime, origin+ all gave excellent value for there game library's which again makes stuff practically free.
- Lots of free games ( already got like 100 games for free this year ) honestly gaming on PC was never this cheap. And that all thanks to the sharp focus on the PC market that creates competition.
- 1060 and pascal in general hold up perfectly fine in all titles still to this day, even while the 1060 is a 980 with more or less v-ram, its at this point a 8 year old card performance wise still runs everything is just proof how good and cheap PC gaming really is if it wasn't for the gpu prices. Something this guy heavily overlooks.
- PC gaming market is growing with asia joining, but growth in general size wise.
- indie market is doing good work to the point they almost make AAA company's seem amateurish. valheim, that award winning card game + hades type of games.
- streaming has never been as easy to get into.
- New technology introduction, big / small cores + 5.0 pci-e, ddr5, fsr, nis.
- The only downside i can think off its the relative lackbusting AAA game developer we see lately, but consoles also get hit with this as they share the same games on that front. Battlefield / Age of empire 4 stuff that simple aren't up to standards to the point lots of people got dissapointed by it.
- Mining while looked on negatively here, actually makes u money while not doing anything.

In General i would say 2021 was a really good year for PC. and 2022 and 2023 also both look extremely good for PC with new tech, new hardware and new games coming from all directions.

About the GPU part.

GPU prices are expensive, so is everything else these days. While people want a 3080, u can settle for less and be fine with it also. While 1k sounds a lot for a GPU, u can also make a lot with GPU's through mining which will offset the cost eventually. Yes more effort, but it is what it is.

Personally for the higher end segment or even mid end segment gpu prices haven't been much of a problem. Its the low end that get shit by it the most. So i agree with him on that.

I sold my 1080ti for 500 euro's 5 months ago, bought a 3080 for 1090 ( a bit cheaper then scalper price like 100 cheaper or something ) and with having it bought through my company i get tax back. so its basically 361 euro final cost for me. probably mined like 100 euro's back on top of it whenever i feel like mining. So in short not really much of a problem really.
 

rodrigolfp

Member
I still want my RTX 3070 that doesn't cost $1200+!!!
Get a console already, is more convenient. Cheaper and CO2 friendlier. Requires less space and you get a free bluray drive with it. No need to buy a key anymore for your annual powerdvd player.

You lot with your fat sausage fingers can´t build PCs anymore. Why even bother. Who wants that? First stage arthritis aint fun man. Always having to go under the table, all covered in spiderwebs and other shit ...


Computer Delete GIF
Not sure if sarcastic or not, but all the limitations of consoles make them very inconvenient for tons of people that play on pc. So console = exclusives only...
 
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PC will always be an afterthought. Only reasons you see certain publishers getting into porting to PC is for the very few areas where consoles aren't the dominate ones in the market.
Dominate ones how? Cause if you're speaking performance wise than that is never, you come across as someone who yet again can't speak with nuance when it comes to this topic and knows very little surrounding it. I apologize in advance that you will have to continually choose between performance or graphics for the foreseeable future as consoles struggle to keep up. As someone who owns a PS5 it is strictly an exclusive machine, absolutely everything else gets thrown on the PC cause I don't want to have to sacrifice anything, options are good.
 

BigBooper

Gold Member
Eh, I don't know. Even though I've mostly switched over to console gaming the past year, PC has gotten a lot. AOE4 was great. Many great console ports have come and are coming. VR had several great PC releases recently. GOG, for all their missteps, had many great old rereleased this year. The Star Trek game dump was great.

It does feel like shovelware as far as the eye can see on Steam now though.
 
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