Playstation VR owners, has the technology blown your mind?

dezzy8

Member
The bad resolution is the only thing that ruins it for me. It constantly amazes me when I look behind myself in driveclub and see the back seats. It really feels like I'm in the car. Eve Valkyrie is cool too when I look down and see the rest of my body or is that rigs. Can't remember. VR is amazing though.
 

Peltz

Member
Edit: OK that was a bullshit argument. The people who are buying PSVR probably have more disposable income and that's not really a concern. I just question when it gets to the point that VR is common enough. Will it be able to go toe to toe quality wise with standard games. I think it has to meet or surpass standard gaming quality including visual IQ to gain true traction.
It doesn't. It more than makes up for IQ with immersion.
 

zoukka

Member
You can move the goal post as much as you want why Batman, Rigs, London Heist or Until Dawn or whatever do not count.

I read on here that it will be a little bit better than GearVR and having used GearVR I do not agree with that after having played with both.

I'm not moving anything. OF course these AAA-developers can stomp whatever crap is found on gearVR.
 

Zalusithix

Member
I read on here that it will be a little bit better than GearVR and having used GearVR I do not agree with that after having played with both.

Who said it would be a "little bit better" than a mobile phone driven device? I've seen plenty of comments saying it wouldn't be as good as PCVR or the PS4 on a traditional screen, but comparing it to mobile VR? Nope.
 

Moreche

Member
Yes, I'm absolutely loving it, it's been my favourite tech purchase since the first day I received my PS2.
I'm loving PSVR more than my first iPhone. But and it's a big but, it needs momentum because without big momentum it can very easily end up stuck in its box.
What's here at the moment has my mind racing with what's possible and that's great because the resolution, screen and motion will undoubtably get better but it'll only get better if Sony has a reason to.
Typical chicken and egg scenario and it's a shame because it appears Microsoft and Apple are more behind AR than VR.
 

emb

Member
A little, yeah. I knew sorta kinda what to expect from people here talking about it. But it's the first time I've really tried out high quality VR stuff. The sense of presence is stronger than I really expected, especially with motion controls + rumble.
 

benny_a

extra source of jiggaflops
Who said it would be a "little bit better" than a mobile phone driven device? I've seen plenty of comments saying it wouldn't be as good as PCVR or the PS4 on a traditional screen, but comparing it to mobile VR? Nope.
Do you want a list of usernames?
What happens if I spend 15 minutes to find those posts, because surprisingly I didn't bookmark them in for example 2015 so I could whip them out now.

If I just do it for you to say okay you weren't lying I'm not really incentivized.
 

EL CUCO

Member
This thread is not helping my already bleeding wallet.

Is it still comfortable and immersive while wearing glasses?
 

jaypah

Member
Do you want a list of usernames?
What happens if I spend 15 minutes to find those posts, because surprisingly I didn't bookmark them in for example 2015 so I could whip them out now.

If I just do it for you to say okay you weren't lying I'm not really incentivized.

I'm not used to seeing you on the other end of a "Who are these people? Name names!" exchange. You're usually the one calling for sources lol.

Anyway after having read/participated in most VR threads over the past few years I don't recall anyone saying that. GearVR doesn't even have positional tracking. It's also just a phone. Not saying that it didn't happen, just that it would have had to be a small number of people that stupid as krejlooc, cake or any other regular would have jumped on that and dismissed it pretty quickly.
 
My brother doesn't have a GAF account so I'll repeat what he told me. "Holy shit! It's so real!" "Mind is blown!"
Ok he didn't say that last part
 
Eve Valkyrie almost brought me to my knees with how awesome it was. Getting shot out of the launch tubes never gets old in that game and the feeling of being in space is mindblowing for me. I'm a huge space nerd and have always been one ever since my dad introduced me to Star Wars as a kid, and flying the space fighters in Eve was a dream come true moment for me *manly tears of joy*. I seriously can't wait to download the Star Wars Battlefront VR experience this holiday.

The sense of presence in games like Driveclub, Until Dawn, The Kitchen demo is incredible. Anyone that hasn't tried the Playroom VR platform game needs to try it now, I was literally floored by it. I didn't even know platformers in VR were possible and that game knocks it out of the park. I was having legit Super Mario 64 feels when I was playing it. I haven't been this excited about gaming since I was a little lad. VR is definitely the future of gaming.
 

Zalusithix

Member
Do you want a list of usernames?
What happens if I spend 15 minutes to find those posts, because surprisingly I didn't bookmark them in for example 2015 so I could whip them out now.

If I just do it for you to say okay you weren't lying I'm not really incentivized.

You were the one calling them "authorities", so I figured they were prominent enough names that you'd remember. To me the hyperbole sounds like something that would be used by VR detractors looking for a way to shoot down PSVR. VR enthusiasts would have been quick to temper expectations, but I can't imagine anybody with any knowledge going so far as to say a device as powerful as the PS4 would barely be better at VR than a freaking phone. (Unless they were purely talking about screen/optics.)
 

benny_a

extra source of jiggaflops
I'm not used to seeing you on the other end of a "Who are these people? Name names!" exchange. You're usually the one calling for sources lol.
I am indeed. Mostly that is posts that are in the very thread we're talking about, not posts from 2015.

But hey, call a mod. If I'm to provide the names I will. I know how it goes and my statement was made with that in mind.

You were the one calling them "authorities", so I figured they were prominent enough names that you'd remember. To me the hyperbole sounds like something that would be used by VR detractors looking for a way to shoot down PSVR. VR enthusiasts would have been quick to temper expectations, but I can't imagine anybody with any knowledge going so far as to say a device as powerful as the PS4 would barely be better at VR than a freaking phone. (Unless they were purely talking about screen/optics.)
http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1060677

That is not word for word GearVR, which I haven't found by him but his various posts were quoted in a lot of threads. I can't say if that was done by detractors because, again, we're talking about a period of 18 months.

And as a bonus:
UNINFORMED OPINION AHOY: To be honest, I tend to feel like PSVR is a lot closer to GearVR than it is Vive/Oculus. Single screen, focused on affordability over quality.

Now I would rather not have to establish how that poster has carried themselves since then in VR threads.
 

muteki

Member
This thread is not helping my already bleeding wallet.

Is it still comfortable and immersive while wearing glasses?

Glasses have no impact on my experience at all.

Sure I'd rather they not be there, just like any other activity I'd rather not be wearing them.

But they don't hamper my enjoyment at all.
 

JCX

Member
It's absurd how immersed i feel in RIGs. The moment of coming up from the tunnel into the arena, looking to your sides and seeing giant mech guns, just can't be beat.

edit: The front visor is adjustable, so my glasses have never been an issue.
 

DjRalford

Member
Nothing anyone says can describe it, it's something you need to go out and experience yourself.

To me it is the next major leap in home console gaming, and provided you are not looking for PS4 HDTV level graphics and can appreciate the immersion it's absolutely stunning.
 

Aostia

El Capitan Todd
Not yet
I tried many games but apart from the initial wow novelty effect I wasnt hooked by neither the actual tech nor by any of the actual games
 

jaypah

Member
I am indeed. Mostly that is posts that are in the very thread we're talking about, not posts from 2015.

But hey, call a mod. If I'm to provide the names I will. I know how it goes and my statement was made with that in mind.

I didn't care enough when you asked me to name names, I damn sure don't care about this enough to call a mod lol. I found it funny. It's literally as simple as that.
 

EL CUCO

Member
Glasses have no impact on my experience at all.

Sure I'd rather they not be there, just like any other activity I'd rather not be wearing them.

But they don't hamper my enjoyment at all.
Nice.

So the immersive experience simply feels as if you had glasses on while being in it? It doesnt feel stupid like watching a 3D movie and needing to put glasses over your glasses, right?
 
It's not mind-blowing, but it's pretty darn awesome.

Until Dawn: Rush of Blood (demo) was scary as hell, and I don't usually get scared by "scary" games and movies.
 

Oozer3993

Member
No. There are just too many limitations with the technology currently. The effect can be very cool at times, but there's a lot holding it back. You are literally strapped to your entertainment center, so there's not much moving around. If you're playing a game that requires motion control, which is usually required for the best immersion, you can't turn away from the cameras because they'll lose the controller or controllers. First person games make for the best immersion, but movement within them is problematic. At the moment there's either teleporting, or moving with the analog stick. The former is unsatisfying for many games and the latter can cause motion sickness in some people. I haven't found VR to add much to non-first-person games that you couldn't get from a nice, large screen and decent surround speakers or headphones. And this all requires you to strap something onto your skull to play it, something that is literally designed to block out everything from the real world. The better to give you the feeling of being "in the game." But you're never really "in" the game. It's more "you from the waist up" are in the game. Your legs aren't tracked, which can make for a weird disconnect in games that do track your movement via the headset or the Move controllers. Case in point: Headmaster, a soccer game that doesn't, and can't, let you kick the ball.

The games right now are just short experiences, but I'm not sure VR can support anything else, at least for the near future. That movement issue is gonna be a real bear, and I don't see it being solved for awhile. And PSVR is gonna be plagued by the low resolution for the life of the product. It's very noticeable at times and can strip quite a bit from the immersion. And just due to the very nature of putting you "in the game," it significantly ups the difficulty for developers aiming for immersion. Traditional games have a layer of suspension of disbelief built in that eases immersion. VR can strip that away An example:

You don't really care that you're controlling a million dollar McClaren with a small rubber nubbin on your controller when playing a game normally. You're sitting on you couch with you feet up on the coffee table. So what that those hundreds of horsepower are controlled with an analog stick. But sit in the cockpit of that car and suddenly it feels weird. You can see the hand crafted, leather-clad steering wheel right in front of you, with hands grasping it. But they're not yours. Your hands are on a plastic controller. And you don't accelerate or brake with your feet. Sure, if you look down you can see your feet and the gas and brake pedals, but to hit them, you don't press your foot down, you press the triggers with your fingers. Now, you can alleviate that with a nice wheel and pedals. But what about non-driving games in VR? They'll have their own versions of that problem (see "not being able to kick a soccer ball in a soccer game" for another example, or "squeezing a trigger to pick up objects" for a third).

You might be able to get over those humps quite easily, I don't know. As you can tell by a lot of the responses so far, at least in the honeymoon period, a lot of people have had little trouble doing just that. I'm interested to see if it stays that way going forward.
 

test_account

XP-39C²
This thread is not helping my already bleeding wallet.

Is it still comfortable and immersive while wearing glasses?
I have these glasses and i have no problem using the PSVR with them: http://images.eyeglasses.com/product/large/1bcf7052.jpg

I also think that i have to use glasses with PSVR actually. I tried to peak a bit above the glasses, and the picture got more blurry. It could be because i was looking at a part of the screen being out of focus though, but no problem using my glasses with PSVR.
 

mrklaw

MrArseFace
Believe it or not, I actually think TumbleVR is my favorite game for PSVR. It actually feels like you're stacking real blocks in a real room. I'm not sure how else to explain it, but placing a block in 3D space in VR just feels so precise in a way that cannot be felt on any normal screen (or even on a 3D display like the 3DS).

It gives me the same feeling I get when I'm playing Jenga in real life with my friends.

Not surprising to me. First, tumble was always good with move controllers and stereo 3D support. Then for VR it has simple graphics to help mitigate the low resolution, and the ultimate bjects are relatively close to you, emphasising the sense of depth and solidity.

Minecrift on DK1 was good even with the low resolution. Standing close to a stone block it just naturally felt 'real' in a way that was kind of dumbfounding to me. I was looking at it going 'I know this is just a screen on my head, but that feels like I really can reach out and touch it'
 

cakely

Member
I don't know if I would say "blown away", because it's not my first VR experience.

I have definitely had some laugh out loud moments of joy, and it's been a long while since I've done that in a game.
 

fixuis

Member
Damn straight it has, its like having your own damn arcade strapped to your face or your own personal cinema or your own cartoony platform where you are Literally inside of it. Just Amazing.
 

muteki

Member
Nice.

So the immersive experience simply feels as if you had glasses on while being in it? It doesnt feel stupid like watching a 3D movie and needing to put glasses over your glasses, right?
My glasses at least don't feel like they are making any contact with the headset itself. Even with it placed in the closest position. It isn't like a 3D TV or Theater experience where you are wearing one pair of glasses smooshed on top of another pair of glasses. You are just in the experience, wearing glasses.
 

Zalusithix

Member
I am indeed. Mostly that is posts that are in the very thread we're talking about, not posts from 2015.

But hey, call a mod. If I'm to provide the names I will. I know how it goes and my statement was made with that in mind.


http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1060677

That is not word for word GearVR, which I haven't found by him but his various posts were quoted in a lot of threads. I can't say if that was done by detractors because, again, we're talking about a period of 18 months.

And as a bonus:


Now I would rather not have to establish how that poster has carried themselves since then in VR threads.

I think you mistook what Krejlooc was getting at. He was tempering expectations and saying you can't just point to a given gen's graphics and be like "this is what we'll have". The reality is more complex, and there are absolutely compromises made in every VR title out there right now to get to the performance targets needed. That doesn't mean things can't look good though.

Also Krejlooc replied to the bonus comment refuting it:
I'd expect the size of the step up from Gear VR to PSVR to be the same as the step up from PSVR to CV1/Vive. I don't think Sony's offering will be closer to GearVR.

GearVR feels a lot like a very polished, consumer-ready version of type of VR experiences I had with DK1, both because of lack of positional tracking and because the games are smaller and simpler (due to lack of horse power in GearVR, and due to the experimental nature of DK1 demos). I'd expect PSVR to feel similarly like a very polished, consumer version of the type of VR experiences we had with DK2. I'd closest compare PSVR with something like OSVR.

I fully expect the full, big titles for CV1 and Vive to be an entirely different class of VR.

Mind you with the addition of the Move controllers I'd argue that PSVR goes further than DK2 level experiences, but that's an entirely different topic. (Also Krejlooc was messing around with motion controllers in the DK2 era IIRC, so his definition of DK2 might be slightly different than most.)
 

Croatoan

They/Them A-10 Warthog
Im glad people are digging psvr. In my limited time with it i thought it was pretty good for an intermediate product. It in no way eclipses its big Brothers though.

Those of you who like it would love the full roomscale experience and supersampled IQ of a Vive on a beast PC.

The future is bright and i hope Sony adds in roomscale somehow so the best of Vive can be played on psvr.
 

test_account

XP-39C²
No. There are just too many limitations with the technology currently. The effect can be very cool at times, but there's a lot holding it back. You are literally strapped to your entertainment center, so there's not much moving around. If you're playing a game that requires motion control, which is usually required for the best immersion, you can't turn away from the cameras because they'll lose the controller or controllers. First person games make for the best immersion, but movement within them is problematic. At the moment there's either teleporting, or moving with the analog stick. The former is unsatisfying for many games and the latter can cause motion sickness in some people. I haven't found VR to add much to non-first-person games that you couldn't get from a nice, large screen and decent surround speakers or headphones. And this all requires you to strap something onto your skull to play it, something that is literally designed to block out everything from the real world. The better to give you the feeling of being "in the game." But you're never really "in" the game. It's more "you from the waist up" are in the game. Your legs aren't tracked, which can make for a weird disconnect in games that do track your movement via the headset or the Move controllers. Case in point: Headmaster, a soccer game that doesn't, and can't, let you kick the ball.

The games right now are just short experiences, but I'm not sure VR can support anything else, at least for the near future. That movement issue is gonna be a real bear, and I don't see it being solved for awhile. And PSVR is gonna be plagued by the low resolution for the life of the product. It's very noticeable at times and can strip quite a bit from the immersion. And just due to the very nature of putting you "in the game," it significantly ups the difficulty for developers aiming for immersion. Traditional games have a layer of suspension of disbelief built in that eases immersion. VR can strip that away An example:

You don't really care that you're controlling a million dollar McClaren with a small rubber nubbin on your controller when playing a game normally. You're sitting on you couch with you feet up on the coffee table. So what that those hundreds of horsepower are controlled with an analog stick. But sit in the cockpit of that car and suddenly it feels weird. You can see the hand crafted, leather-clad steering wheel right in front of you, with hands grasping it. But they're not yours. Your hands are on a plastic controller. And you don't accelerate or brake with your feet. Sure, if you look down you can see your feet and the gas and brake pedals, but to hit them, you don't press your foot down, you press the triggers with your fingers. Now, you can alleviate that with a nice wheel and pedals. But what about non-driving games in VR? They'll have their own versions of that problem (see "not being able to kick a soccer ball in a soccer game" for another example, or "squeezing a trigger to pick up objects" for a third).

You might be able to get over those humps quite easily, I don't know. As you can tell by a lot of the responses so far, at least in the honeymoon period, a lot of people have had little trouble doing just that. I'm interested to see if it stays that way going forward.
If you're going for full room scale and body tracking, i think the market wouldnt be able to support that. It would require too much. And even room scale limits you to a smaller room, unless you have access to a huge hangar or something, but then you need tons of tracking cameras and thats nothing the mass market can support. Going for full immersion in every type of game seems very hard, if not near impossible, so i would not have such expectations.

Every headset with also have the set resolution for their lifetime, its not just for PSVR. We must wait for new hardware for higher resolution screens.
 

SomTervo

Member
My brother doesn't have a GAF account so I'll repeat what he told me. "Holy shit! It's so real!" "Mind is blown!"
Ok he didn't say that last part

Your brother is Sean Murray?

No. There are just too many limitations with the technology currently. The effect can be very cool at times, but there's a lot holding it back. You are literally strapped to your entertainment center, so there's not much moving around. If you're playing a game that requires motion control, which is usually required for the best immersion, you can't turn away from the cameras because they'll lose the controller or controllers. First person games make for the best immersion, but movement within them is problematic. At the moment there's either teleporting, or moving with the analog stick. The former is unsatisfying for many games and the latter can cause motion sickness in some people. I haven't found VR to add much to non-first-person games that you couldn't get from a nice, large screen and decent surround speakers or headphones. And this all requires you to strap something onto your skull to play it, something that is literally designed to block out everything from the real world. The better to give you the feeling of being "in the game." But you're never really "in" the game. It's more "you from the waist up" are in the game. Your legs aren't tracked, which can make for a weird disconnect in games that do track your movement via the headset or the Move controllers. Case in point: Headmaster, a soccer game that doesn't, and can't, let you kick the ball.

The games right now are just short experiences, but I'm not sure VR can support anything else, at least for the near future. That movement issue is gonna be a real bear, and I don't see it being solved for awhile. And PSVR is gonna be plagued by the low resolution for the life of the product. It's very noticeable at times and can strip quite a bit from the immersion. And just due to the very nature of putting you "in the game," it significantly ups the difficulty for developers aiming for immersion. Traditional games have a layer of suspension of disbelief built in that eases immersion. VR can strip that away An example:

You don't really care that you're controlling a million dollar McClaren with a small rubber nubbin on your controller when playing a game normally. You're sitting on you couch with you feet up on the coffee table. So what that those hundreds of horsepower are controlled with an analog stick. But sit in the cockpit of that car and suddenly it feels weird. You can see the hand crafted, leather-clad steering wheel right in front of you, with hands grasping it. But they're not yours. Your hands are on a plastic controller. And you don't accelerate or brake with your feet. Sure, if you look down you can see your feet and the gas and brake pedals, but to hit them, you don't press your foot down, you press the triggers with your fingers. Now, you can alleviate that with a nice wheel and pedals. But what about non-driving games in VR? They'll have their own versions of that problem (see "not being able to kick a soccer ball in a soccer game" for another example, or "squeezing a trigger to pick up objects" for a third).

You might be able to get over those humps quite easily, I don't know. As you can tell by a lot of the responses so far, at least in the honeymoon period, a lot of people have had little trouble doing just that. I'm interested to see if it stays that way going forward.

Tried the Vive? Is the answer to pretty much all these problems.
 
Having experienced the Vive before (which is still the superior tech), games like the Playroom platformer and London Heist still managed to blow me away. And I've yet to try the other heavy hitters (rigs, Batman, thumper, rez). Tracking has been an issue half the time, so I've been trying to adjust for the optimal settings. But I'm still excited, and I'm definitely keeping the PSVR.
 
The London Heist fucking completely blew me away. It's seriously one of the coolest things I've ever seen in gaming and I've been playing since the NES days.
 

KORNdoggy

Member
God yes! I would even go as far as saying if they released a new headset tomorrow with a 4k screen i'd buy it. Its a game changer for me. Like playing the PSone for the first time coming from 2D sprites.
 
I wouldn't say my mind has been completely blown, but I'm very impressed and happy with what we have so far. As others have said, it does feel like a big jump from regular gaming to VR.

I'm excited to see where generation 2, 3 and so forth end up going with it as it will only get better. I just hope that we'll be seeing a steady stream of games coming out. Looking forward to RE7 as it will be another full-on game supporting VR.
 

Dick Jones

Gold Member
If you have a PS4 go for it, if you can afford it. If you have a powerful PC as well as a PS4, buy the vive, again if you can afford it. VR is great but if you think you have to get immersed in vr for it to work then there is something wrong with you. PS4 graphics are not close to real life, neither is Pc.
 

Spman2099

Member
I don't know how I will feel about it in six months, but I am super impressed with it at the moment. It helps that the software lineup is genuinely great.
 

emb

Member
This thread is not helping my already bleeding wallet.

Is it still comfortable and immersive while wearing glasses?
It is.

But glasses definitely made it less comfortable for me. Mostly from my constant worrying that I might push my glasses too much against the lenses and scratch something, especially when looking up.

After a while you start learning not to notice it though, and you get a better feel for how to position the headset. I've also only had one play session, I'm sure it's something that starts to feel more comfortable as you adjust.
 
Personally I think VR is a brilliant new way to play and experience games. Being actually in the game is so cool and very immersive.

The tech is great and while its early days and far from perfect right now, its still good enough to be very entertaining. PSVR is the best bit of gaming tech I've brought in quite a while now.
 
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