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Positive Discrimination or Affirmative Action ?

Vier

Member
Jun 7, 2019
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Hello to you all

I have dilemma towards this policy. On the one hand it is not fair, on the other hand millions benefited from it raising them from poverty and turning them away from a life in crime. I and my dolphin friends also may have been a beneficiary since I come from a disadvantaged segment of the society and probably given preference during the final stages of admission to the university where I eventually studied.

So, what do you think?
 

haxan7

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“Probably given preference” - you don’t actually know. That’s one of the shittiest parts of affirmative action. You could have been admitted solely based on your own merits, but even if you were, you’ll carry the gift of self doubt for the rest of your life.

I totally ripped that off Crowder.
 

Grinchy

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Aug 3, 2010
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a cave outside of Whoville.
If we're going to do it, it should probably just be based on financial reasons. If you grew up poor, school may have been more challenging. Not every black kid grows up poor and not every white kid grows up rich.

It's kinda ridiculous IMO that a college would say that poor white kids have to meet minimum SAT scores because they're white. And a black kid who grew up in a wealthy family can have a lower minimum SAT score for admission because...I dunno maybe they read Huckleberry Finn when he was in 4th grade and it made him uncomfortable that week and it was the reason his SAT score was 200 points lower. Doing things just based on skin color is really stupid.
 

EviLore

Expansive Ellipses
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May 30, 2004
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Blind merit-based is the only fair and sustainable system.

The economically disadvantaged who are bright enough to meet academic standards should have access to higher education via grants and loans, for fields where they can realistically repay those loans upon entering the workforce.
 

Mohonky

Member
Jan 19, 2007
11,643
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Give the disadvantaged a fair chance so i'm all for affirmative action.


"Minorities, women and the disabled."
The problem is how you work that out.

Look at Asian students trying to get into College in the US; they get screwed big time. Is it because they all immigrate with wads of cash and attend the best educational institutions available? Hardly, a upper middle class African American will be pushed over the line while an Asian American from a poor household will be dragged back because he had the audacity to be born of Asian ethnicity.

In Britain white males from the lower class actually score the lowest with the least likelihood of attending higher education and because of their race and sex, have less access to advancement programs. So what about them?
 

Somnium

Gold Member
Apr 1, 2016
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Minorities, women and the disabled.
So you don't see a problem with placing generally healthy, able mind & body minorities and women in the same category as literally disabled people?

Considering the damage we have done with slavery and discrimination i think we owe it to minorities to reverse societal losses.
Who's we?

What about minorities who lead successful and healthy lives?
 

TaySan

Member
Dec 16, 2018
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Through the damage our government/society has done to minorities we have put minorities who are just as capable in a disadvantaged position financially so i believe we should repay for societal losses caused by racism/slavery and discrimination.
 
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synchronicity

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Dec 16, 2011
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So being a woman or black is a handicap
In today's world, being a white man is a pretty big disadvantage. Crush the patriarchy! :p

Personally, I think the best possible world is a world in which people make their peace with things *not* being fair. I'm not suggesting people accept abuse or mistreatment in a docile manner necessarily, but looking for pure equality is like looking for utopia. They're fever dreams. Living in a state of outrage doesn't benefit the indignant or society at large.
 
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GAMETA

Formerly 'pork_gamete'
Jun 3, 2014
1,503
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It's a complicated issue. I'm in to help those in need but there's a thin line between actually helping and social program abuse.

I often think it's better to invest in chirldren, make sure they grow up right and well school educated regardless of social class. Feed them if needed, provide basic dignity if needed. Not everyone needs higher education, a decent childhood is a must.
 

Whitesnake

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Jan 31, 2018
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Through the damage our government/society has done to minorities we have put minorities who are just as capable in a disadvantaged position financially so i believe we should repay for societal losses caused by racism/slavery and discrimination.
The solution to discrimination is not more discrimination.

And you keep saying “we”, “our”.
I am not guilty of anything you’ve claimed, and I would hope you aren’t guilty of it either. The idea that I or anyone alive today should have to sacrifice anything, be it opportunities, money, whatever, to apologize for the actions of men who’ve been dead and buried for a quite long time is absolutely ridiculous.

The ideal state of race relations is one where race is not a factor in regards to opportunity, not one where we try to find the right ‘balance’ of racism.
 
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Nov 5, 2016
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One Big Room, Full Of Bad Bitches
I’m really not an expert on Affirmative Action but just going off a recent headline on the NFL proposal to provide a competitive advantage to any franchise who hires a minority as head coach or front office executive, this can’t be “The Way.” There must to be better, more authentic methods of opening doors for the underprivileged without tokenizing them or just using their presence somewhere as some form of supplemental....”bonus,” for lack of a better word.
 

EviLore

Expansive Ellipses
Staff Member
May 30, 2004
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Kurt Vonnegut had something to say about equality of outcome in this short story (very much worth a read):

Harrison Bergeron said:
THE YEAR WAS 2081, and everybody was finally equal. They weren't only equal before God and the law. They were equal every which way. Nobody was smarter than anybody else. Nobody was better looking than anybody else. Nobody was stronger or quicker than anybody else. All this equality was due to the 211th, 212th, and 213th Amendments to the Constitution, and to the unceasing vigilance of agents of the United States Handicapper General.

Some things about living still weren't quite right, though. April for instance, still drove people crazy by not being springtime. And it was in that clammy month that the H-G men took George and Hazel Bergeron's fourteen-year-old son, Harrison, away.

It was tragic, all right, but George and Hazel couldn't think about it very hard. Hazel had a perfectly average intelligence, which meant she couldn't think about anything except in short bursts. And George, while his intelligence was way above normal, had a little mental handicap radio in his ear. He was required by law to wear it at all times. It was tuned to a government transmitter. Every twenty seconds or so, the transmitter would send out some sharp noise to keep people like George from taking unfair advantage of their brains.

George and Hazel were watching television. There were tears on Hazel's cheeks, but she'd forgotten for the moment what they were about.

On the television screen were ballerinas.

A buzzer sounded in George's head. His thoughts fled in panic, like bandits from a burglar alarm.

"That was a real pretty dance, that dance they just did," said Hazel.

"Huh" said George.

"That dance-it was nice," said Hazel.

"Yup," said George. He tried to think a little about the ballerinas. They weren't really very good-no better than anybody else would have been, anyway. They were burdened with sashweights and bags of birdshot, and their faces were masked, so that no one, seeing a free and graceful gesture or a pretty face, would feel like something the cat drug in. George was toying with the vague notion that maybe dancers shouldn't be handicapped. But he didn't get very far with it before another noise in his ear radio scattered his thoughts.

George winced. So did two out of the eight ballerinas.

Hazel saw him wince. Having no mental handicap herself, she had to ask George what the latest sound had been.

"Sounded like somebody hitting a milk bottle with a ball peen hammer," said George.

"I'd think it would be real interesting, hearing all the different sounds," said Hazel a little envious. "All the things they think up."

"Um," said George.

"Only, if I was Handicapper General, you know what I would do?" said Hazel. Hazel, as a matter of fact, bore a strong resemblance to the Handicapper General, a woman named Diana Moon Glampers. "If I was Diana Moon Glampers," said Hazel, "I'd have chimes on Sunday-just chimes. Kind of in honor of religion."

"I could think, if it was just chimes," said George.

"Well-maybe make 'em real loud," said Hazel. "I think I'd make a good Handicapper General."

"Good as anybody else," said George.

"Who knows better than I do what normal is?" said Hazel.

"Right," said George. He began to think glimmeringly about his abnormal son who was now in jail, about Harrison, but a twenty-one-gun salute in his head stopped that.

"Boy!" said Hazel, "that was a doozy, wasn't it?"

It was such a doozy that George was white and trembling, and tears stood on the rims of his red eyes. Two of of the eight ballerinas had collapsed to the studio floor, were holding their temples.

"All of a sudden you look so tired," said Hazel. "Why don't you stretch out on the sofa, so's you can rest your handicap bag on the pillows, honeybunch." She was referring to the forty-seven pounds of birdshot in a canvas bag, which was padlocked around George's neck. "Go on and rest the bag for a little while," she said. "I don't care if you're not equal to me for a while."

George weighed the bag with his hands. "I don't mind it," he said. "I don't notice it any more. It's just a part of me."

"You been so tired lately-kind of wore out," said Hazel. "If there was just some way we could make a little hole in the bottom of the bag, and just take out a few of them lead balls. Just a few."

"Two years in prison and two thousand dollars fine for every ball I took out," said George. "I don't call that a bargain."

"If you could just take a few out when you came home from work," said Hazel. "I mean-you don't compete with anybody around here. You just sit around."

"If I tried to get away with it," said George, "then other people'd get away with it-and pretty soon we'd be right back to the dark ages again, with everybody competing against everybody else. You wouldn't like that, would you?"

"I'd hate it," said Hazel.

"There you are," said George. The minute people start cheating on laws, what do you think happens to society?"

If Hazel hadn't been able to come up with an answer to this question, George couldn't have supplied one. A siren was going off in his head.

"Reckon it'd fall all apart," said Hazel.

"What would?" said George blankly.

"Society," said Hazel uncertainly. "Wasn't that what you just said?

"Who knows?" said George.

The television program was suddenly interrupted for a news bulletin. It wasn't clear at first as to what the bulletin was about, since the announcer, like all announcers, had a serious speech impediment. For about half a minute, and in a state of high excitement, the announcer tried to say, "Ladies and Gentlemen."

He finally gave up, handed the bulletin to a ballerina to read.

"That's all right-" Hazel said of the announcer, "he tried. That's the big thing. He tried to do the best he could with what God gave him. He should get a nice raise for trying so hard."

"Ladies and Gentlemen," said the ballerina, reading the bulletin. She must have been extraordinarily beautiful, because the mask she wore was hideous. And it was easy to see that she was the strongest and most graceful of all the dancers, for her handicap bags were as big as those worn by two-hundred pound men.

And she had to apologize at once for her voice, which was a very unfair voice for a woman to use. Her voice was a warm, luminous, timeless melody. "Excuse me-" she said, and she began again, making her voice absolutely uncompetitive.

"Harrison Bergeron, age fourteen," she said in a grackle squawk, "has just escaped from jail, where he was held on suspicion of plotting to overthrow the government. He is a genius and an athlete, is under-handicapped, and should be regarded as extremely dangerous."

A police photograph of Harrison Bergeron was flashed on the screen-upside down, then sideways, upside down again, then right side up. The picture showed the full length of Harrison against a background calibrated in feet and inches. He was exactly seven feet tall.

The rest of Harrison's appearance was Halloween and hardware. Nobody had ever born heavier handicaps. He had outgrown hindrances faster than the H-G men could think them up. Instead of a little ear radio for a mental handicap, he wore a tremendous pair of earphones, and spectacles with thick wavy lenses. The spectacles were intended to make him not only half blind, but to give him whanging headaches besides.

Scrap metal was hung all over him. Ordinarily, there was a certain symmetry, a military neatness to the handicaps issued to strong people, but Harrison looked like a walking junkyard. In the race of life, Harrison carried three hundred pounds.

And to offset his good looks, the H-G men required that he wear at all times a red rubber ball for a nose, keep his eyebrows shaved off, and cover his even white teeth with black caps at snaggle-tooth random.

"If you see this boy," said the ballerina, "do not - I repeat, do not - try to reason with him."

There was the shriek of a door being torn from its hinges.

Screams and barking cries of consternation came from the television set. The photograph of Harrison Bergeron on the screen jumped again and again, as though dancing to the tune of an earthquake.

George Bergeron correctly identified the earthquake, and well he might have - for many was the time his own home had danced to the same crashing tune. "My God-" said George, "that must be Harrison!"

The realization was blasted from his mind instantly by the sound of an automobile collision in his head.

When George could open his eyes again, the photograph of Harrison was gone. A living, breathing Harrison filled the screen.

Clanking, clownish, and huge, Harrison stood - in the center of the studio. The knob of the uprooted studio door was still in his hand. Ballerinas, technicians, musicians, and announcers cowered on their knees before him, expecting to die.

"I am the Emperor!" cried Harrison. "Do you hear? I am the Emperor! Everybody must do what I say at once!" He stamped his foot and the studio shook.

"Even as I stand here" he bellowed, "crippled, hobbled, sickened - I am a greater ruler than any man who ever lived! Now watch me become what I can become!"

Harrison tore the straps of his handicap harness like wet tissue paper, tore straps guaranteed to support five thousand pounds.

Harrison's scrap-iron handicaps crashed to the floor.

Harrison thrust his thumbs under the bar of the padlock that secured his head harness. The bar snapped like celery. Harrison smashed his headphones and spectacles against the wall.

He flung away his rubber-ball nose, revealed a man that would have awed Thor, the god of thunder.

"I shall now select my Empress!" he said, looking down on the cowering people. "Let the first woman who dares rise to her feet claim her mate and her throne!"

A moment passed, and then a ballerina arose, swaying like a willow.

Harrison plucked the mental handicap from her ear, snapped off her physical handicaps with marvelous delicacy. Last of all he removed her mask.

She was blindingly beautiful.

"Now-" said Harrison, taking her hand, "shall we show the people the meaning of the word dance? Music!" he commanded.

The musicians scrambled back into their chairs, and Harrison stripped them of their handicaps, too. "Play your best," he told them, "and I'll make you barons and dukes and earls."

The music began. It was normal at first-cheap, silly, false. But Harrison snatched two musicians from their chairs, waved them like batons as he sang the music as he wanted it played. He slammed them back into their chairs.

The music began again and was much improved.

Harrison and his Empress merely listened to the music for a while-listened gravely, as though synchronizing their heartbeats with it.

They shifted their weights to their toes.

Harrison placed his big hands on the girls tiny waist, letting her sense the weightlessness that would soon be hers.

And then, in an explosion of joy and grace, into the air they sprang!

Not only were the laws of the land abandoned, but the law of gravity and the laws of motion as well.

They reeled, whirled, swiveled, flounced, capered, gamboled, and spun.

They leaped like deer on the moon.

The studio ceiling was thirty feet high, but each leap brought the dancers nearer to it.

It became their obvious intention to kiss the ceiling. They kissed it.

And then, neutraling gravity with love and pure will, they remained suspended in air inches below the ceiling, and they kissed each other for a long, long time.

It was then that Diana Moon Glampers, the Handicapper General, came into the studio with a double-barreled ten-gauge shotgun. She fired twice, and the Emperor and the Empress were dead before they hit the floor.

Diana Moon Glampers loaded the gun again. She aimed it at the musicians and told them they had ten seconds to get their handicaps back on.

It was then that the Bergerons' television tube burned out.

Hazel turned to comment about the blackout to George. But George had gone out into the kitchen for a can of beer.

George came back in with the beer, paused while a handicap signal shook him up. And then he sat down again. "You been crying" he said to Hazel.

"Yup," she said.

"What about?" he said.

"I forget," she said. "Something real sad on television."

"What was it?" he said.

"It's all kind of mixed up in my mind," said Hazel.

"Forget sad things," said George.

"I always do," said Hazel.

"That's my girl," said George. He winced. There was the sound of a rivetting gun in his head.

"Gee - I could tell that one was a doozy," said Hazel.

"You can say that again," said George.

"Gee-" said Hazel, "I could tell that one was a doozy."
 

DESTROYA

Member
Jan 1, 2011
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Through the damage our government/society has done to minorities we have put minorities who are just as capable in a disadvantaged position financially so i believe we should repay for societal losses caused by racism/slavery and discrimination.
Your showing more and more of your reset influences and that’s not a good thing.
 

Woo-Fu

incest on the subway
Jan 2, 2007
15,425
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Considering the damage we have done with slavery and discrimination i think we owe it to minorities to reverse societal losses.
Who is this "we"? If you think you owe then by all means start by donating your salary to whichever minorities you feel are most deserving. Don't volunteer the rest of us when it comes to paying for your guilt.
 
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Sign

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Jun 4, 2012
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If the problem is not enough of a certain group/s qualifying for admission that is something to address further up the chain. Lowering standards not only sees people get in who will not be able to maximize the limited position (whether their fault or not) to its fullest, but also displace those that could. It is the most inefficient way to handle this issue on top of being discrimination.

Change how schools are funded.
Change how schools are taught.
Get rid of college and rebuild high school.
Micro-target communities. What is needed in rural Appalachia is different than in Detroit.
Etc.
 
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kingbean

Member
Jun 27, 2016
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content of character is all that's ever mattered to me

Martin Luther King said:
I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.
Honestly that speech makes me tear up.
 
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oagboghi2

Member
Apr 15, 2018
6,516
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480
Hello to you all

I have dilemma towards this policy. On the one hand it is not fair, on the other hand millions benefited from it raising them from poverty and turning them away from a life in crime. I and my dolphin friends also may have been a beneficiary since I come from a disadvantaged segment of the society and probably given preference during the final stages of admission to the university where I eventually studied.

So, what do you think?
Don't worry about it. People have been given preferential treatment for centuries. Just consider yourself lucky you were born in a time where the dice rolled your way.
 

Stilton Disco

Member
Aug 22, 2014
5,527
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Considering the damage we have done with slavery and discrimination i think we owe it to minorities to reverse societal losses.
I have never owned slaves nor have I ever discriminated against anyone.

Hell, I personally contributed through my taxes towards the repayment of the massive loan my country had to take out in the 1800's, that ended slavery throughout allof the British Empire (and thus most of the planet) as well as the trading of slaves between other nations, something that no previous civilisation had ever done before, since up until that point owning slaves was a sad normality for our species regardless of race, religion or culture.

It was such a massive and expensive undertaking that it was only paid off less than a decade ago. By your definition, most of those people alive today descended from former slaves actually 'owes' me their freedom more than I 'owe' them anything.

Even if you're just talking about Americans, then they fought a bloody war to end slavery and undo that injustice. The debt was paid with peoples lives, the side that wanted to keep slavery even more so, since they lost and were forced to capitulate.

If you ignore the lessons of history, you're doomed to repeat it.

By focusing soley on the negatives of one era of history, ignoring all that came before and after, just to frame a narrative that the descendants of people who did terrible things somehow owe anyone a debt for their ancestors wrong doings, is just that. The same mistake, just in a different context.

Also, affirmative action or positive discrimination is nothing but the soft racism of low expectations. We are all equels in the eyes of wider society and the law.

Life is unfair, it's suffering, and pain, and disappointment, and it almost always ends in fear and pain, but you don't make the world a better place by giving preferential treatment to some and not others based on random circumstances of birth. People have free will, and they need to be allowed to choose whether they will try or give up on their own terms, regardless of the consequences.
 
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godhandiscen

There are millions of whiny 5-year olds on Earth, and I AM THEIR KING.
Mar 15, 2007
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“Probably given preference” - you don’t actually know. That’s one of the shittiest parts of affirmative action. You could have been admitted solely based on your own merits, but even if you were, you’ll carry the gift of self doubt for the rest of your life.

I totally ripped that off Crowder.
Seriously. One time I got an offer from a big company and a jealous friend told me that it was probably due to my skin color. I had not refutal whatsoever.

Through the damage our government/society has done to minorities we have put minorities who are just as capable in a disadvantaged position financially so i believe we should repay for societal losses caused by racism/slavery and discrimination.
It is not the government that increases the social inequality. It is the companies lobbying for policy which control the government. The government is nothing but an instrument. Microsoft/Google/Facebook/Amazon the same companies that control the righteous message of equality for all stand at the top of the capitalism pyramid unchallenged. These companies have grown to valuations of upwards of a trillion in the span of two decades, and somehow we believe that the ideology they defend is in our best interests.
 

DeafTourette

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Apr 23, 2018
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There is institutional racism ... It's embedded in this:

The richest people in this country are white. They are friends with each other. They hobnob with each other. They employ each other and each other's family and friends. From CEOs to VPs to managers and supervisors. They help each other and kind of close ranks. They don't normally see people who look like ... Say... Idris Elba working in their fields or as their employees because they UNCONSCIOUSLY hire those that look like them. So when "affirmative action" comes along, they don't like it and hate being forced to take "the dregs". It might explain why there were no black NFL coaches until RELATIVELY recently.

But then you have people like my bosses... White men in GA who hire anyone willing to work hard as long as they also are team players. My coworkers are mostly latino and black (and some Afro Latinas).

What I'm saying is, it's a mixed bag. You'll find situations like the NFL as far as the head coaches and presidents and such... And you'll find situations like at my job (which isn't white collar).

The solution? Like Evilore said... A true blind hiring process. No take backs once they see you're non-white or non-black or non-whatever. Because I know that has happened many times according to non-white friends and family.

Until then... We're just going to keep flailing our arms in the ocean until we can swim like a school.
 
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matt404au

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There is institutional racism ... It's embedded in this:

The richest people in this country are white. They are friends with each other. They hobnob with each other. They employ each other and each other's family and friends. From CEOs to VPs to managers and supervisors. They help each other and kind of close ranks. They don't normally see people who look like ... Say... Idris Elba working in their fields or as their employees because they UNCONSCIOUSLY hire those that look like them. So when "affirmative action" comes along, they don't like it and hate being forced to take "the dregs". It might explain why there were no black NFL coaches until RELATIVELY recently.

But then you have people like my bosses... White men in GA who hire anyone willing to work hard as long as they also are team players. My coworkers are mostly latino and black (and some Afro Latinas).

What I'm saying is, it's a mixed bag. You'll find situations like the NFL as far as the head coaches and presidents and such... And you'll find situations like at my job (which isn't white collar).

The solution? Like Evilore said... A true blind hiring process. No take backs once they see you're non-white or non-black or non-whatever. Because I know that has happened many times according to non-white friends and family.

Until then... We're just going to keep flailing our arms in the ocean until we can swim like a school.
This is all unfalsifiable, faith-based nonsense.
 

DeafTourette

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Apr 23, 2018
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This is all unfalsifiable, faith-based nonsense.
It's anecdotal for sure and just looking at how the rich and powerful are in this country should make my logic easy to follow.

Whether you choose to believe it or not is not my problem ...

Racism DOES exist in the US and it's not just hiding behind ignorance in a tank top living in squalor. It's also alive in companies and the rich who think they're colorblind.
 

haxan7

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The solution? Like Evilore said... A true blind hiring process. No take backs once they see you're non-white or non-black or non-whatever. Because I know that has happened many times according to non-white friends and family.
Who is gonna want to hire people they’ve never seen or met, especially at small businesses where a lot rides on each hire? Or are you proposing that people wear bags over their head to interviews to hide their appearance? Or sit behind a one way mirror?

did you think that idea through at all before typing it up and hitting post?
 

matt404au

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It's anecdotal for sure and just looking at how the rich and powerful are in this country should make my logic easy to follow.

Whether you choose to believe it or not is not my problem ...

Racism DOES exist in the US and it's not just hiding behind ignorance in a tank top living in squalor. It's also alive in companies and the rich who think they're colorblind.
It's not even anecdotal as you have no personal experience with it. They're all pseudo-religious assumptions that are passed down through black culture -- caricatures of evil white billionaires controlling all the capital and pulling your puppet strings. It's a very convenient way of explaining away the results of your own actions (or inaction) and escaping from personal responsibility, the very thing the US was founded on.

It is your problem if you want me to believe something so consequential without evidence. Of course racism exists, but nowhere near the magnitude that you claim, and in my observation most of it is certainly not aimed in the direction you think it is. Your country was the first to give up slavery -- it even fought a civil war for it. Remember that.
 

Paltheos

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Feb 28, 2015
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Ideally I'm for it. If two, equally qualified candidates apply for a position and one of them is from a disenfranchised segment of society, yeah, sure. The better off one should be better, right, and if he's not maybe that's a sign the other guy put in more work.

If you're perverting affirmative action into some organizational mandate for diversity though you can go fuck right off.

This is all my uneducated opinion though.
 

EviLore

Expansive Ellipses
Staff Member
May 30, 2004
25,624
41,404
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There is institutional racism ... It's embedded in this:

The richest people in this country are white. They are friends with each other. They hobnob with each other. They employ each other and each other's family and friends. From CEOs to VPs to managers and supervisors. They help each other and kind of close ranks. They don't normally see people who look like ... Say... Idris Elba working in their fields or as their employees because they UNCONSCIOUSLY hire those that look like them. So when "affirmative action" comes along, they don't like it and hate being forced to take "the dregs". It might explain why there were no black NFL coaches until RELATIVELY recently.

But then you have people like my bosses... White men in GA who hire anyone willing to work hard as long as they also are team players. My coworkers are mostly latino and black (and some Afro Latinas).

What I'm saying is, it's a mixed bag. You'll find situations like the NFL as far as the head coaches and presidents and such... And you'll find situations like at my job (which isn't white collar).

The solution? Like Evilore said... A true blind hiring process. No take backs once they see you're non-white or non-black or non-whatever. Because I know that has happened many times according to non-white friends and family.

Until then... We're just going to keep flailing our arms in the ocean until we can swim like a school.
These are the richest people in the United States:





Mostly tech nerds. Tech nerds are very far from mustachio-twirling robber baron racists scoffing at the idea of black people in the good ol' boys country club, and companies like Amazon, Microsoft, Facebook, and Google are among the most committed to diversity hiring.
 

Alx

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Jan 22, 2007
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Positive discrimination is wrong, and I don't think it really helps solving the problem. The fact that the wealth distribution isn't representative of the population is an anomaly, but it is also an indicator of the issues with the current system. You won't fix those issues by forcing the indicator to the right value, just like you won't prevent your engine from overheating by forcing the gauge needle in the green.
To help balance things out, you need to provide support to people who need it (free education, scholarships, financial support), and keep watching your untouched indicators until they move in the right direction by themselves.
 
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TriSuit666

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Jul 2, 2018
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Tokenism and a form of internalised racism. Allow people to shine on their talent and character, not the colour of their skin.

Also, cut the nonsense that only one race practised or suffered from slavery.
 
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Super Mario

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Nov 12, 2016
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content of melanin and/or estrogen is all that matters
FTFY

Anyone with half a brain knows this is just more Liberal pandering. If you really wanted to help people, you could create some better education or training programs or incentives for it. The problem with that, is most people just won't put the effort in. They just want the reward, and meeting those quotas is the only real goal

It's all noble when you yourself are one of the rich, spoiled, white people that this seems to "balance". Just as long as it doesn't personally affect you. It's a great day in the age of discrimination where I go for a job, more qualified, more experience, much better interview, but a halfway decent woman showed up, and "we need more women". It has happened before.