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Retro Anime Discussion 2020

Space Runaway

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It would be nice to be a chairman for one of these Japanese studios today and sit all the staff down for a modern anime. Pretty much, just show them these GIFs and say: Here's the money, here's your motive, your computers are all in the dumpster in the back lot...get busy. They say if you remove some of the tools from an artists, it challenges them to become more creative...it would be nice to see that again. People can still be sold on good animation and not just proxy stories with CG doing most of the work. I hear many excuses but no real solid reasons for Asian or American animators not to start trying harder with the budgets they have. They could start by not making series that are 26 + episodes long and cut everything down to 8-10 episodes and let them work from that. If Japan did this...they'd be above American animators again (like they were in the 80's).
That would require a whole system change and things are definitely not heading in the direction you want. =P It's nice to imagine though. If I were one of these mega corp richie rich types I'd commission some projects. I'm sure I'd be forced to overspend to get what I'm looking for but such as it is.
 
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Space Runaway

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Someone uploaded the remastered Little Nemo pilots from the recent JP bluray.

The Little Nemo movie was a troubled project that had everyone from George Lucas to Hayao Miyazaki attached at some point. These three pilots were by Sadao Tsukioka, Yoshifumi Kondo (Prominent Ghibli animator and animation director as well as director of Whisper of the Heart) and the late great Osamu Dezaki.


The bluray release was actually the first time the Sadao Tsukioka pilot has seen any kind of release. Not as visually interesting as the other two though.
 
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Happosai

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That would require a whole system change and things are definitely not heading in the direction you want. =P It's nice to imagine though. If I were one of these mega corp richie rich types I'd commission some projects. I'm sure I'd be forced to overspend to get what I'm looking for but such as it is.
Sounds like fiction to me. Kinda goes back to Shouta's comment last night about taking risks with modern studios. Like I said, even if they had the budget...It wouldn't be for taking a high-quality risk. They'd likely take a large budget and blow it by creating a 200 episode prequel to some existing series. Seems to be the trend these days (HollyWood does that, too). Right now, I see about 70% of Western anime fans who are really invested into artwork, originality, and new shows for new seasons. That number keeps dropping, though. I know many who were hardcore anime fans in college who have stopped watching anime completely. We were all art students, so it's getting bored of anime. If the fan service and merchandising stopped and it was just the anime...there probably would even be a mainstream Western anime audience anymore. I don't hate modern anime...I just don't understand why animators want to work on something that will be forgotten in less than 10-years (given how low a Japanese animator is paid...which is super low).
 
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DragoonWalker

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Animators and studios aren't ballsy enough to make anything like this anymore. Not sure when moe came along but that whole "let's be cutesy" trend hurts. I watched a short doc on YouTube recently basically pinpointing why anime has gone so far downhill. Basically, great violent cop anime like MadBull 34 could have been influenced by movies like Lethal Weapon. Today a non-violent cop anime would be influenced by another cop anime. The guy in the doc basically States that modern anime only feeds off itself and fandom and isn't being influenced by much else.

There's a sex scene in K.I.T.E. but I never considered it to be a hentai. People used to give me crap about Wicked City (still like it a lot but I was obsessed with Kawajiri in my teens-20's)...It's not hentai either. K.I.T.E. has too much action and drama to fit in with hentai. Mezzo Forte by the same creator...that's hentai.

Sad that Kon has already passed away. With regard to all the great titles you mentioned and a "nod" to modern anime...I'll leave this quote here:

"It's better to burn out, than it is to rust..." - My, My, Hey Hey (Neil Young, 1979)

He mentions in the electric version of the song "Rust Never Sleeps." I feel anime has simply been rusting and it doesn't stop. Old anime burnt out and there isn't much flame in the heart of modern audiences to go back and check it out for that reason.
Ah yes things sure have changed right. I think the demographics certainly have. Anime always had moe, but it wasn't the overwhelmingly dominant content. They were always limited to certain moments, characters, or shows (C-Ko from Project A-ko comes to mind. Even Lynn Minmay of Macross is kinda a proto-moe character). But you're right, anime is as incestuous as ever. One of the reasons Bebop is so great because its creator reached deep into his love for classic western cinema, music, and pop culture (mostly from the 70s) to create something that had super wide appeal. It really takes the right people to make it happen. It's not like Hollywood is cranking out anything other than PG-13 superhero schtick these days so really who's to blame...

Yeah I'm being facetious, Kite is really just Leon the Professional with sex scenes thrown in. If anything it pushed the boundaries, which is what great anime should do. Wicked City is just so beautiful, every shot is perfect. How can that be hentai... The colors, the lighting, my god. It's got Italian Giallo sensibilities like Susperia, or the works of Sezuki Seijun. That's another thing I miss about 80s OVAs, lots of them were filled with shots of surreal and dramatic lighting. That was gone though, even by the late 90s.

What was that doc btw? You got a link? Also reminds me I saw a pretty good dissection about the death of classic anime myself:

Maybe it's because we've been inundated with just modern content, that today's anime viewers don't see the need to reach back. I mean getting your hands on anime use to be so much harder, that people would seek out the good stuff (I remember getting burned CDs of postage stamp resolution anime from friends in the schoolyard, good times). Now there's hundreds of new shows a season at your fingertips (but so much of it crap)...
 

Happosai

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Ah yes things sure have changed right. I think the demographics certainly have. Anime always had moe, but it wasn't the overwhelmingly dominant content. They were always limited to certain moments, characters, or shows (C-Ko from Project A-ko comes to mind. Even Lynn Minmay of Macross is kinda a proto-moe character). But you're right, anime is as incestuous as ever. One of the reasons Bebop is so great because its creator reached deep into his love for classic western cinema, music, and pop culture (mostly from the 70s) to create something that had super wide appeal. It really takes the right people to make it happen. It's not like Hollywood is cranking out anything other than PG-13 superhero schtick these days so really who's to blame...

Yeah I'm being facetious, Kite is really just Leon the Professional with sex scenes thrown in. If anything it pushed the boundaries, which is what great anime should do. Wicked City is just so beautiful, every shot is perfect. How can that be hentai... The colors, the lighting, my god. It's got Italian Giallo sensibilities like Susperia, or the works of Sezuki Seijun. That's another thing I miss about 80s OVAs, lots of them were filled with shots of surreal and dramatic lighting. That was gone though, even by the late 90s.

What was that doc btw? You got a link? Also reminds me I saw a pretty good dissection about the death of classic anime myself:

Maybe it's because we've been inundated with just modern content, that today's anime viewers don't see the need to reach back. I mean getting your hands on anime use to be so much harder, that people would seek out the good stuff (I remember getting burned CDs of postage stamp resolution anime from friends in the schoolyard, good times). Now there's hundreds of new shows a season at your fingertips (but so much of it crap)...
Granted there are more organized docs than this, just skip through and he hits a bunch of good points.

 
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Space Runaway

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I don't hate modern anime...I just don't understand why animators want to work on something that will be forgotten in less than 10-years (given how low a Japanese animator is paid...which is super low).
In some way it's probably similar to all the animators at Hanna Barbera or Filmation and such who hated the assembly line stuff they were making but kept up in hopes of getting onto better projects. Though most animation seems to be handled in the slave labor manner anyway. =P

I mean getting your hands on anime use to be so much harder, that people would seek out the good stuff (I remember getting burned CDs of postage stamp resolution anime from friends in the schoolyard, good times). Now there's hundreds of new shows a season at your fingertips (but so much of it crap)...
I think about this sometimes. Years ago I would have killed for such easy access to so much anime. Course now that it's here it's mostly stuff I don't want. :messenger_smirking:
 

Happosai

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In some way it's probably similar to all the animators at Hanna Barbera or Filmation and such who hated the assembly line stuff they were making but kept up in hopes of getting onto better projects. Though most animation seems to be handled in the slave labor manner anyway. =P



I think about this sometimes. Years ago I would have killed for such easy access to so much anime. Course now that it's here it's mostly stuff I don't want. :messenger_smirking:
I was in the swing of modern anime until 2012 and that's when I have up on it ever improving. I remember the last thing I watched that was newer (this was likely years after it was released) was Ichi the Killer. The animation and art style was horrid. The story made violent anime like M.D. Geist ll look better. I recall watching it in one of my apartments and something about a young guy who slowly becomes a serial killer. Apparently he mutilates people then wanks himself afterward. I always recall seeing Clannad, Wolf's Rain, Naruto, Excel Saga, and Elfen Lied; finished half of any of those and just started asking myself "why isn't this as good as what I was watching before?" I simply gave up. Every other year I'll skim through Anime News Network and read about newer titles and just pass on all. It's seeker sensitive and it's nothing groundbreaking. I don't even get the people who were able to watch beyond Dragon Ball. Dragon Ball Z to me never lived up to the original and now there's Dragon Ball Super. The creators of GoShogun proved that you can end your own anime and romantically too. No spoilers but just watch the movie and you'll see what I mean. Then read translated interviews on why they did what they did to GoShogun. Here kunonabi kunonabi and others like myself are big into Ranma 1/2 and even Ranma 1/2 had more than enough of a run...38 manga volumes, 161 TV episodes, 11 OVAs, 2 TV specials, and 2 movies. Yet, I'm sure there's some idiot out there pushing studios to remake Ranma 1/2 into something like Ranma Z: Extreme! 🤔
 

Dacon

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I was in the swing of modern anime until 2012 and that's when I have up on it ever improving. I remember the last thing I watched that was newer (this was likely years after it was released) was Ichi the Killer. The animation and art style was horrid. The story made violent anime like M.D. Geist ll look better. I recall watching it in one of my apartments and something about a young guy who slowly becomes a serial killer. Apparently he mutilates people then wanks himself afterward. I always recall seeing Clannad, Wolf's Rain, Naruto, Excel Saga, and Elfen Lied; finished half of any of those and just started asking myself "why isn't this as good as what I was watching before?" I simply gave up. Every other year I'll skim through Anime News Network and read about newer titles and just pass on all. It's seeker sensitive and it's nothing groundbreaking. I don't even get the people who were able to watch beyond Dragon Ball. Dragon Ball Z to me never lived up to the original and now there's Dragon Ball Super. The creators of GoShogun proved that you can end your own anime and romantically too. No spoilers but just watch the movie and you'll see what I mean. Then read translated interviews on why they did what they did to GoShogun. Here kunonabi kunonabi and others like myself are big into Ranma 1/2 and even Ranma 1/2 had more than enough of a run...38 manga volumes, 161 TV episodes, 11 OVAs, 2 TV specials, and 2 movies. Yet, I'm sure there's some idiot out there pushing studios to remake Ranma 1/2 into something like Ranma Z: Extreme! 🤔
I truly dread the possibility of a modern Ranma anything. To think of what people would do to one of my favorite franchise of all time with their terrible modern day sensibilities.

Especially if the horde of gender critical blue hair clowns got into it.

It's sad though, I used to dream about the rest of the manga getting adapted, but I just don't trust people to do it justice today.
 
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Happosai

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I truly dread the possibility of a modern Ranma anything. To think of what people would do to one of my favorite franchise of all time with their terrible modern day sensibilities.

Especially if the horde of gender critical blue hair clowns got into it.

It's sad though, I used to dream about the rest of the manga getting adapted, but I just don't trust people to do it justice today.
Well, the manga wasn't complete at the time they were making the movies, the series, and drafting the OVAs. The OVAs were the last thing made and they came out about the time Rumiko finally finished Ranma. I think the would have animated it but everyone wanted to see her marry Ranma and Akane. Like actually have an uninterrupted ceremony. She never goes full circle and I think if screenwriters wrote a marriage OVA, it would have been going over the creator's head. So, I get why they stopped.

Modern studios would ruin it like they have with every older series that's being remade or rewritten. Can't even picture moe blob Akane. Ranma would have to be made more feminine in his male form (seems like twig armed beta males are taking leads in most modern anime...but they have had attitudes.grrr).

Despite my gripe with modern anime, I think we can safely say they wouldn't make it something woke or political. Japan doesn't seem to do that very much (involve politics with art). That's more of a Western thing.
 

Dacon

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Well, the manga wasn't complete at the time they were making the movies, the series, and drafting the OVAs. The OVAs were the last thing made and they came out about the time Rumiko finally finished Ranma. I think the would have animated it but everyone wanted to see her marry Ranma and Akane. Like actually have an uninterrupted ceremony. She never goes full circle and I think if screenwriters wrote a marriage OVA, it would have been going over the creator's head. So, I get why they stopped.
Oh I know all of that.

Modern studios would ruin it like they have with every older series that's being remade or rewritten. Can't even picture moe blob Akane. Ranma would have to be made more feminine in his male form (seems like twig armed beta males are taking leads in most modern anime...but they have had attitudes.grrr).
Rumiko's artstyle would get lost in translation in favor of more appealing "modern" styles I'm almost certain of that.

Despite my gripe with modern anime, I think we can safely say they wouldn't make it something woke or political. Japan doesn't seem to do that very much (involve politics with art). That's more of a Western thing.
I'm not saying they would, I'm saying the fandom would get invaded by those cunts because it would be the new popular thing to watch and it would be awful. I've already seen dumbass articles from pseudo intellectuals saying shit like if Ranma gets remade it has to confront Ranma's gender identity in a serious fashion.
 
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kunonabi

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Well, the manga wasn't complete at the time they were making the movies, the series, and drafting the OVAs. The OVAs were the last thing made and they came out about the time Rumiko finally finished Ranma. I think the would have animated it but everyone wanted to see her marry Ranma and Akane. Like actually have an uninterrupted ceremony. She never goes full circle and I think if screenwriters wrote a marriage OVA, it would have been going over the creator's head. So, I get why they stopped.

Modern studios would ruin it like they have with every older series that's being remade or rewritten. Can't even picture moe blob Akane. Ranma would have to be made more feminine in his male form (seems like twig armed beta males are taking leads in most modern anime...but they have had attitudes.grrr).

Despite my gripe with modern anime, I think we can safely say they wouldn't make it something woke or political. Japan doesn't seem to do that very much (involve politics with art). That's more of a Western thing.
Nah, the politics have been increasing. Been noticing a lot of grafted-on transgender stuff lately.
 
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Shouta

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Taking risks in animation is was made it stand out. Almost no does that. I see a lot of financial worry in modern Japan about making an original anime with the blood and guts. Eastern studios are much more strict as to what their product is. It's not about artist freedom like Angel's Egg or NeoTokyo; it's about repeating certain popular formulas that make money. Many here can admit that harem anime like Tenchi could get annoying. That process sold, though. So they repeated it into the 2000's and beyond. Older anime has it's weaknesses and if they were using the same craft now, I suppose it would be under similar scrutiny. Can't bring it back. We can only look back and appreciate what it was. Always like your critiquing. I don't see Western animation doing so well either. I'm fact, Japanese anime (modern) seems to be more impressive than something like modern Simpsons or Family Guy.
Sure, but the risking taking that made anime popular is very different than the risk taking that popularized the OVA format and the series that came from it during the bubble era. I'm just pointing out that the reason those sorts of titles don't exist now is not a matter of the tastes of consumers changing or even studios being more strict with their products as much as it was the fact there was a situation where random creators could get random funding for what they wanted to do because it was flush with too much cash they could throw it in any direction they wanted. Even by old anime fan standards, the OVA era was an anomaly if you look at the eras that came before and after it.

In addition, that's actually a slight misunderstanding of the industry that it repeats the same formulas to success. Anime is very poorly monetized overall and as a result, it stays with proven formulas to maintain itself until something just happens to really become a hit and cause a new flurry of spending and popularity. Moe was that in the 2000s but Gundam was that to the super robot genre in the 70s./80s for example. Evangelion did it again in the 90s as well. If the industry had a better flow of money it might change the industry as a whole but it's hard to say. It's also why I kind of laugh at the OVA boom because man, that was just lighting money on fire from an industry standpoint, lol.

Granted there are more organized docs than this, just skip through and he hits a bunch of good points.

It's funny but Digibro (well, Digi-nee now that they came out, I think?) is much more about the visual look of anime even to the point of kind of chucking the story content to the aside as they've discussed before. I actually think that's sort of missing the appeal of anime as a whole. It's not just animation but the content combined with animation that really draws people and so a classic isn't just made on the animation alone for people, with a few past exceptions. That said, their point about general mediocrity is true particularly because the industry has adopted that awful high volume approach since the 2000s and it's only made the productions cut corners further and further in most cases as well as cause a numbing effect with fans.

Rumiko's artstyle would get lost in translation in favor of more appealing "modern" styles I'm almost certain of that.
This isn't true, especially with YashaHime coming out soon, since that perfectly replicates her art style. If anything, her style is one of the few from that era that's really transitioned well into modern anime since it's such a simple and distinct style overall.
 
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Dacon

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This isn't true, especially with YashaHime coming out soon, since that perfectly replicates her art style. If anything, her style is one of the few from that era that's really transitioned well into modern anime since it's such a simple and distinct style overall.
Smaller project vs an adaptation of a huge series spanning dozens of volumes. If you think that an adaptation of that magnitude wouldn't make concessions to appeal to a wider audience in modern day, well I think that's a bit silly.

It's also entirely a matter of opinion whether that "perfectly replicates" her artstyle, and that doesn't even matter. The original artstyle of the Ranma manga looks different from her more recent manga style. Hell even the original anime didn't perfectly adapt her style, and the OVAs go even farther in having a more distinct look.

Hell I would expect a modern adaption of the manga to look more like the OVAs than the original anime.
 
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SLoWMoTIoN

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I don't know some of my favorite stuff is from 2005-2018 and the quality from older anime wasn't always the best. I never understood why new people to the medium bring up Legend of the x heroes and say because it was good, everything else was also the GOAT back then. They also compare to the lowest common denominator every single time. Meh. I sure do miss the ultraviolence from the 90s OVA though. Or older shonen where people were allowed to die.
 
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Happosai

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Smaller project vs an adaptation of a huge series spanning dozens of volumes. If you think that an adaptation of that magnitude wouldn't make concessions to appeal to a wider audience in modern day, well I think that's a bit silly.

It's also entirely a matter of opinion whether that "perfectly replicates" her artstyle, and that doesn't even matter. The original artstyle of the Ranma manga looks pretty different from her more recent manga style. Hell even the original anime didn't perfectly adapt her style, and the OVAs go even farther in having a more distinct look.

Hell I would expect a modern adaption of the manga to look more like the OVAs than the original anime.
You sir are correct about that. Art directors have almost all changed the look of Rumiko's characters. The first 50 episodes of Ranma were pretty close to the manga style but ever changing to look more and more like big-eyed 90's anime. Look at the style in the last Ranma T V episodes, it's nothing like the manga aside from the hairstyles. Inuyasha is another. The animated version is a flat 2000's anime style and most of the characters resemble nothing of their manga versions aside from wardrobe.

The industry really is screwing with itself by constantly plundering money into super long series rather than cutting things down to a few episodes. Japan still has the power to make high-end animation but that's not going to happen when they keep demanding proxy shows with 120 + episodes and many times getting cancelled before any completive progress is made.
 
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Happosai

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I don't know some of my favorite stuff is from 2005-2018 and the quality from older anime wasn't always the best. I never understood why new people to the medium bring up Legend of the x heroes and say because it was good everything else was also the GOAT back then. They also compare to the lowest common denominator every single time. Meh. I sure do miss the ultraviolence from the 90s OVA though. Or older shonen where people were allowed to die.
I agree too. Except, I feel there needs to bigger creative shift in some of the modern trends. There are many story ideas that aren't being used that would look great in an anime. I've always wanted a modern anime writer to adapt some of Stephen King's old short stories into animation. That's never been done well (they tried in Creepshow 2...The animation was C-grade).

There's a lot of trash from older anime that even I won't touch. I'm fact, one of the most popular anime of all time (which started in the late-80's) is one which I've never liked or understood.
I
To me anime has fallen back quite a bit but manga is still on top. I never got into American comics but can read manga from any era and enjoy it.

Dragon Ball Z is the giant that I've never been on good terms with...It doesn't deserve the hype or to overshadow it's predecessor Dragon Ball
 

Dacon

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You sir are correct about that. Art directors have almost all changed the look of Rumiko's characters. The first 50 episodes of Ranma were pretty close to the manga style but ever changing to look more and more like big-eyed 90's anime. Look at the style in the last Ranma T V episodes, it's nothing like the manga aside from the hairstyles. Inuyasha is another. The animated version is a flat 2000's anime style and most of the characters resemble nothing of their manga versions aside from wardrobe.

The industry really is screwing with itself by constantly plundering money into super long series rather than cutting things down to a few episodes. Japan still has the power to make high-end animation but that's not going to happen when they keep demanding proxy shows with 120 + episodes and many times getting cancelled before any completive progress is made.
The first season of ranma will always be my favorite.

I think the real problem with a lot of this stuff is the lack of any real long term planning or quality control. The priority seems to just be churning out as much content as possible.
 

SLoWMoTIoN

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I agree too. Except, I feel there needs to bigger creative shift in some of the modern trends. There are many story ideas that aren't being used that would look great in an anime. I've always wanted a modern anime writer to adapt some of Stephen King's old short stories into animation. That's never been done well (they tried in Creepshow 2...The animation was C-grade).

There's a lot of trash from older anime that even I won't touch. I'm fact, one of the most popular anime of all time (which started in the late-80's) is one which I've never liked or understood.
I
To me anime has fallen back quite a bit but manga is still on top. I never got into American comics but can read manga from any era and enjoy it.

Dragon Ball Z is the giant that I've never been on good terms with...It doesn't deserve the hype or to overshadow it's predecessor Dragon Ball
Yep. I watched Z, OG DB is just better in every single way. Also I don't mind manga based off western stuff or original anime being adapted. OA has for the most part been a huge hit and miss sadly. There is still decent anime being made every year but it largely gets ignored or it gets the full CGI treatment which hurts it greatly. (Dorohedoro) Like Dacon Dacon , said the real problem is quality control.
 
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Happosai

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Yep. I watched Z, OG DB is just better in every single way. Also I don't mind manga based off western stuff or original anime being adapted. OA has for the most part been a huge hit and miss sadly. There is still decent anime being made every year but it largely gets ignored or it gets the full CGI treatment which hurts it greatly. (Dorohedoro) Like Dacon Dacon , said the real problem is quality control.
I think it takes a wide variety of interest. The West is pushing animators in Japan to give them more of the same thing, too. That wasn't so much the case in the past. Japan always seemed to wink to a Western audience in older anime but to go about their way targeting the Japanese audience. There's still a lot of ground modern anime can cover like I mentioned earlier. For originals, it would really be nice to see some adaptations of Stephen King's Night Shift or Skeleton Crew. That would blow people away. HollyWood has done a terrible job in the past 15-years of adapting writers and general novels into film. Lensman was made into an anime based on the E.E. "Doc" Smith "Lensman / Triplanetary" novels during the 80's. Which was more interesting: the original novels or the anime? The anime was and although it's never been given a DVD or blu-ray release in the U.S.; it's still being talked about in animation circles. They can still do that. It was also interesting when you'd see an OVA like A.D. Police and say...wow, it's like BladeRunner...but better and with cool songs. Eventually, big guys in the West did start to notice what was going on in Japan. The late Robin Williams listed off his interest in anime in an interview and I remember him being pretty open about the fact that he enjoyed anime. Someone got the famous director Roger Corman (famous for directing the Poe films of the 60's with Vincent Price, Boris Karloff, Peter Lorre, even young Jack Nicholson) to watch Perfect Blue and his rating was published on the promotional posters. Then just recently James Cameron made his version of Battle Angel Aita. I'd have to think that when you start seeing your work actually influencing the West, even if those animators had been low-paid...they know they were a part of something that the world watched and enjoyed.

I guess the issue with the modern politics in anime is that it's working it's way into a niche and catering only to Otaku and not trying to reach the rigid film critics in the West or even in other parts of Japan. Anime itself has become a nerd only thing to the general Japanese population (although manga is somehow considered okay by many in JP). If you have 45 new series coming out in one year; they could push one non-conformist to do something that would inspire everyone else and try to reach for a bigger audience. That's what happened with me over 20-years ago. When I started watching anime, it was Tenchi. Tenchi Muyo started to get boring and I nearly gave up on anime. Then, I stumbled across Wicked City, Demon City Shinjuku, and Vampire Hunter D. It pushed me to work harder on my own comics at that time and try writing something other than comedy. But it kept me from getting bored and giving up on anime.

We still need modern anime alive and well, too. Like I said, the entire art scene of commerciality in Japan uses modern style anime. It's on billboards, TV adverts, even in promos on the elevated trains in the larger cities. It's the basis for all the greater JRPGs that have come out for gamers. So, I don't want to see that artstyle go retroactive. The retro stuff had it's field day in the PC98 days. Time for the new contenders to take that place.
 

Happosai

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Watched Ninja Scroll last weekend for the first time in many years and it still holds up.

Also obtained Crying freeman, Legend of the Overfiend, 3x3 Eyes, Monster City and Wicked City. Fun weekend ahead.
Got the lot of those in my collection. I showed my wife Crying Freeman and she was amazed by how unique the artwork was. Some of the most realistic next to some of Kawajiri's work and almost spot-on with the manga.

Monster City (or Demon City Shinjuku as it was sold in North America) is one which gives the audience a nice scare from reality and should still scare residents of Shinjuku today. I had an acquaintance who was living in Shinjuku and he once put up a poster in public that was roughly translated to "Demon City."

3 X 3 Eyes is a great one and I don't hear it mentioned that often.

Wicked City is one of my personal favorites and hasn't gotten old for me since I first saw it about 21-years ago.

Ninja Scroll holds up and I surprisingly didn't watch it until about 2009 (long after the hype around it had died down). I've never been a big fan of feudal Japan anime but Ninja Scroll had such great effects added to surrealism which made it quite a trip.

Enjoy your weekend, mate! You've struck gold!
 
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Happosai

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Sure, but the risking taking that made anime popular is very different than the risk taking that popularized the OVA format and the series that came from it during the bubble era. I'm just pointing out that the reason those sorts of titles don't exist now is not a matter of the tastes of consumers changing or even studios being more strict with their products as much as it was the fact there was a situation where random creators could get random funding for what they wanted to do because it was flush with too much cash they could throw it in any direction they wanted. Even by old anime fan standards, the OVA era was an anomaly if you look at the eras that came before and after it.

In addition, that's actually a slight misunderstanding of the industry that it repeats the same formulas to success. Anime is very poorly monetized overall and as a result, it stays with proven formulas to maintain itself until something just happens to really become a hit and cause a new flurry of spending and popularity. Moe was that in the 2000s but Gundam was that to the super robot genre in the 70s./80s for example. Evangelion did it again in the 90s as well. If the industry had a better flow of money it might change the industry as a whole but it's hard to say. It's also why I kind of laugh at the OVA boom because man, that was just lighting money on fire from an industry standpoint, lol.



It's funny but Digibro (well, Digi-nee now that they came out, I think?) is much more about the visual look of anime even to the point of kind of chucking the story content to the aside as they've discussed before. I actually think that's sort of missing the appeal of anime as a whole. It's not just animation but the content combined with animation that really draws people and so a classic isn't just made on the animation alone for people, with a few past exceptions. That said, their point about general mediocrity is true particularly because the industry has adopted that awful high volume approach since the 2000s and it's only made the productions cut corners further and further in most cases as well as cause a numbing effect with fans.



This isn't true, especially with YashaHime coming out soon, since that perfectly replicates her art style. If anything, her style is one of the few from that era that's really transitioned well into modern anime since it's such a simple and distinct style overall.
Agreed, there came a time when there was too much mecha anime, too many high school romance anime, and too many fighting anime. Those genres had their highlights but I couldn't take them in high doses.

Speaking of liking something more for the story than the artstyle...I can relate to that, too. The Slayers is not a great anime art style...but I love it for the story that Hajime Kanzaka put together. It's an excellent medieval fantasy comedy and I've found it rewatchable...even though that's never going to change the generic look of the actual anime.

I stated in a comment below how modern anime still has a big influence on Japanese media. They need to push bigger though because they're stuck in a niche. Conventions, fandom, and the like are making it something that appeals to only an exclusive crowd. I think there need to be more renegades willing to do something unpredictable with story, art, and soundtrack that will be remembered in 20-years the way people remember older anime. They can still do that with a smaller budget and without pissing off the studio grumps. There will always be underdogs in the animation industry and we haven't seen the last of them. Imagine how this isolation from COVID-19 affects artists...it challenges them to think of society differently and to write or create with that in mind. So, I won't give up on modern anime just because I think they're stuck in a loop. It won't always be that way.
 

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Nah, the politics have been increasing. Been noticing a lot of grafted-on transgender stuff lately.
I haven't been watching that closely. So, is Japan embracing that sorta thing, too? Politics need to stay out of anime! The trans stuff was funny back when it was just for comedy and people weren't calling it trans. I remember the term was cross-dresser. Well, remember Project A-Ko? They were never pushing that off as something serious and it was friggin hilarious.


 

Thing on a Spring

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Got the lot of those in my collection. I showed my wife Crying Freeman and she was amazed by how unique the artwork was. Some of the most realistic next to some of Kawajiri's work and almost spot-on with the manga.

Monster City (or Demon City Shinjuku as it was sold in North America) is one which gives the audience a nice scare from reality and should still scare residents of Shinjuku today. I had an acquaintance who was living in Shinjuku and he once put up a poster in public that was roughly translated to "Demon City."

3 X 3 Eyes is a great one and I don't hear it mentioned that often.

Wicked City is one of my personal favorites and hasn't gotten old for me since I first saw it about 21-years ago.

Ninja Scroll holds up and I surprisingly didn't watch it until about 2009 (long after the hype around it had died down). I've never been a big fan of feudal Japan anime but Ninja Scroll had such great effects added to surrealism which made it quite a trip.

Enjoy your weekend, mate! You've struck gold!
Unfortunately my search for Ultimate Teacher has proved fruitless. I remember it being a fun ass movie.
 
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Dacon

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I haven't been watching that closely. So, is Japan embracing that sorta thing, too? Politics need to stay out of anime! The trans stuff was funny back when it was just for comedy and people weren't calling it trans. I remember the term was cross-dresser. Well, remember Project A-Ko? They were never pushing that off as something serious and it was friggin hilarious.


Bruh, A-Ko got me feeling the nostalgia
 

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Smaller project vs an adaptation of a huge series spanning dozens of volumes. If you think that an adaptation of that magnitude wouldn't make concessions to appeal to a wider audience in modern day, well I think that's a bit silly.

It's also entirely a matter of opinion whether that "perfectly replicates" her artstyle, and that doesn't even matter. The original artstyle of the Ranma manga looks different from her more recent manga style. Hell even the original anime didn't perfectly adapt her style, and the OVAs go even farther in having a more distinct look.

Hell I would expect a modern adaption of the manga to look more like the OVAs than the original anime.
You sir are correct about that. Art directors have almost all changed the look of Rumiko's characters. The first 50 episodes of Ranma were pretty close to the manga style but ever changing to look more and more like big-eyed 90's anime. Look at the style in the last Ranma T V episodes, it's nothing like the manga aside from the hairstyles. Inuyasha is another. The animated version is a flat 2000's anime style and most of the characters resemble nothing of their manga versions aside from wardrobe.

The industry really is screwing with itself by constantly plundering money into super long series rather than cutting things down to a few episodes. Japan still has the power to make high-end animation but that's not going to happen when they keep demanding proxy shows with 120 + episodes and many times getting cancelled before any completive progress is made.
Takahashi's style is very much maintained throughout all of her series that have been animated. There's minute differences here and there but they are never go so off-brand it looks completely different from episode to episode like what occurred with Dragon Ball Z. For example, take this frame from ep 130 of Ranma and compare it to a panel in the manga.

The style is more or less the same barring some minor issues with consistency but you obviously can't have everything be perfect from frame to frame.

Inuyasha maintained its style throughout its run too despite the change from cel animaton to digital. Compare ep 1 Kagome to Final Ep Kagome

There's slight differences in there but it's largely the same style despite being 165 episodes apart. Here's a panel from the epilogue to boot for comparison.

If we're talking about the vast difference in quality of the animation, that happens but the style? Definitely not the case for Takahashi's series. It's very consistent for her anime unless you're being incredibly nitpicky about it and if we're doing that, then we'd need to be nitpicky about Takahashi's original work then since she has a tendency to shift styles a bit depending on panel too, lol. And to be clear, I'm talking about the style the characters are draw in. That is separate from the level of animation, the quality and style of that. It's pretty important of a distinction like how there's different aspects of character design like costumes, unique features, and the art style of that design.

The real problem nowadays isn't consistency in art style anyway, it's just consistency in quality in general. Schedules are shit, pay is shit, and there's a lot of off-shoring to reduce costs even further nowadays which is super unfortunate.
 
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Dacon

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The style is more or less the same barring some minor issues with consistency but you obviously can't have everything be perfect from frame to frame.
Yeah you're not convincing me of anything with this here. In that Ranma comparison the anime looks like shit compared to the manga page you posted.
 
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Shouta

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Yeah you're not convincing me of anything with this here. In that Ranma comparison the anime looks like shit compared to the manga page you posted.
That's a totally different argument. 🤷‍♂️ I'm just responding with the fact that they've been super on target about Takahashi's style in animated form. I don't think there's an argument against that but there's certainly room to say it could look better or more consistent. I could just grab another, better keyframe from the same episode instead of using an inbetween.

Episode in question though it's in Spanish I guess? lol

 
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Happosai

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That's a totally different argument. 🤷‍♂️ I'm just responding with the fact that they've been super on target about Takahashi's style in animated form. I don't think there's an argument against that but there's certainly room to say it could look better or more consistent. I could just grab another, better keyframe from the same episode instead of using an inbetween.

Episode in question though it's in Spanish I guess? lol

That's a totally different argument. 🤷‍♂️ I'm just responding with the fact that they've been super on target about Takahashi's style in animated form. I don't think there's an argument against that but there's certainly room to say it could look better or more consistent. I could just grab another, better keyframe from the same episode instead of using an inbetween.

Episode in question though it's in Spanish I guess? lol

You may need to look at the manga and compare with the first 45 or so anime episodes. I see some big differences. Then again, I'm pretty nitpicky.
 
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Space Runaway

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I haven't been watching that closely. So, is Japan embracing that sorta thing, too? Politics need to stay out of anime! The trans stuff was funny back when it was just for comedy and people weren't calling it trans. I remember the term was cross-dresser. Well, remember Project A-Ko? They were never pushing that off as something serious and it was friggin hilarious.


I'd hate to see what they'd say about the ending to the Prefectural Earth Defense Force OVA. :messenger_smirking:


Also Discotek has announced they're releasing Dancougar on bluray. Unfortunately on twitter they mentioned they're using the newer 2016 remaster which are degrained and kinda look like an internet upscale job =/

(Not my captures)
 
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Shouta

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You may need to look at the manga and compare with the first 45 or so anime episodes. I see some big differences. Then again, I'm pretty nitpicky.
I would chalk it up more to the overall production and direction they were going with each episode more than art style issues. A lot of episodes early into the series have way more energy put into them like with the action, the setting, background characters and more. For individual frames in the same situation and pose? I don't think it's a very big diff, especially when we're discussing how the art is relative to the original author's.
I'd hate to see what they'd say about the ending to the Prefectural Earth Defense Force OVA. :messenger_smirking:


Also Discotek has announced they're releasing Dancougar on bluray. Unfortunately on twitter they mentioned they're using the newer 2016 remaster which are degrained and kinda look like an internet upscale job =/


(Not my captures)
Damn, that degraining is ugly as fuck.
 

Dacon

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That's a totally different argument. 🤷‍♂️ I'm just responding with the fact that they've been super on target about Takahashi's style in animated form.
It's really not? My whole original statement was that they haven't been totally on model with her style in the anime, and your comparisons don't prove otherwise.

As Happosai said:

You sir are correct about that. Art directors have almost all changed the look of Rumiko's characters. The first 50 episodes of Ranma were pretty close to the manga style but ever changing to look more and more like big-eyed 90's anime. Look at the style in the last Ranma T V episodes, it's nothing like the manga aside from the hairstyles. Inuyasha is another. The animated version is a flat 2000's anime style and most of the characters resemble nothing of their manga versions aside from wardrobe.
and theyre not wrong.

I'm currently going through the series with one of my friends who's never seen before, and every now and then we point this out.
 
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Happosai

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I would chalk it up more to the overall production and direction they were going with each episode more than art style issues. A lot of episodes early into the series have way more energy put into them like with the action, the setting, background characters and more. For individual frames in the same situation and pose? I don't think it's a very big diff, especially when we're discussing how the art is relative to the original author's.


Damn, that degraining is ugly as fuck.
Well, if it helps on behalf of Ranma 1/2, I was more find of the TV series than the manga. I noticed a change in the overall work from episodes 1-40, 41-50, 50-161. I didn't check Anime News Network to see how many producers there were but the directors changed after episode 18. Genma's panda form was enormous in the first 16 episodes and then made smaller from the latter to the end. With Inuyasha, I noticed they took away a lot of detail from facial features and the animation seems to get stiffer after that switch in directors on episode 45-169. I guess that's inevitable for most artists though. All comic and manga artists who work over a decade start changing their character design. I preferred Rumiko's 80's style, though. Not just in drawing but in story. I could never connect with One Pound Gospel of Inuyasha the way I could with Maison Ikkoku and Ranma 1/2. Unfortunately, I never got to see very much of Urusei Yatsura other than the movies. I also liked Rumiko's Mermaid Saga.

The clean-up in blu-ray should Not have been tampered with. Although, I agree that it's nice when they can clean up audio. So many things on DVD have simulated stereo and were never properly restored.
 

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Well, if it helps on behalf of Ranma 1/2, I was more find of the TV series than the manga. I noticed a change in the overall work from episodes 1-40, 41-50, 50-161. I didn't check Anime News Network to see how many producers there were but the directors changed after episode 18. Genma's panda form was enormous in the first 16 episodes and then made smaller from the latter to the end. With Inuyasha, I noticed they took away a lot of detail from facial features and the animation seems to get stiffer after that switch in directors on episode 45-169. I guess that's inevitable for most artists though. All comic and manga artists who work over a decade start changing their character design. I preferred Rumiko's 80's style, though. Not just in drawing but in story. I could never connect with One Pound Gospel of Inuyasha the way I could with Maison Ikkoku and Ranma 1/2. Unfortunately, I never got to see very much of Urusei Yatsura other than the movies. I also liked Rumiko's Mermaid Saga.

The clean-up in blu-ray should Not have been tampered with. Although, I agree that it's nice when they can clean up audio. So many things on DVD have simulated stereo and were never properly restored.
There's certainly production differences as the series goes on. You'll see the range of motion and animation in action scenes get way worse, more oddly proportioned sequences, and occasionally really sloppy drawing for sure. I don't think it looks off especially since Takahashi whips out tons of styles in the manga. That may also be way it's not that strange to me since I was way more familiar with the manga than I was the anime.

As for Inuyasha the style is steady but the animation definitely takes a dive as the series makes the format switch. That might be what you're noticing, the animation of them, rather he drawing of the characters. Ranma 1/2 uses way more styles as a whole in the series so there's a lot of room there but Inuyasha was a lot more subdued on that front so they were able to maintain the look unless someone just got plain sloppy. It's way easier to pull clips/videosfor it too to compare like.

These videos:

Inuyasha episode 1:

Inuyasha the Final:

As for Takahashi's style over the years, I think I mentioned it before but her style hasn't evolved as much as it just got less busy, likely due to age. There definitely feels like there's more time and care taken into paneling and drawing stuff in the past rather than her style just straight changing. She's more of a Togashi situation than say a Kubo or Kishimoto to use artists that had really long running series.
 
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Happosai

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There's certainly production differences as the series goes on. You'll see the range of motion and animation in action scenes get way worse, more oddly proportioned sequences, and occasionally really sloppy drawing for sure. I don't think it looks off especially since Takahashi whips out tons of styles in the manga. That may also be way it's not that strange to me since I was way more familiar with the manga than I was the anime.

As for Inuyasha the style is steady but the animation definitely takes a dive as the series makes the format switch. That might be what you're noticing, the animation of them, rather he drawing of the characters. Ranma 1/2 uses way more styles as a whole in the series so there's a lot of room there but Inuyasha was a lot more subdued on that front so they were able to maintain the look unless someone just got plain sloppy. It's way easier to pull clips/videosfor it too to compare like.

These videos:

Inuyasha episode 1:

Inuyasha the Final:

As for Takahashi's style over the years, I think I mentioned it before but her style hasn't evolved as much as it just got less busy, likely due to age. There definitely feels like there's more time and care taken into paneling and drawing stuff in the past rather than her style just straight changing. She's more of a Togashi situation than say a Kubo or Kishimoto to use artists that had really long running series.
When did they start digital inking Inuyasha. I've seen movie 1 and I'm up to episode 137 and so far it still looks hand painted. Was it during "Final Act?" Final Act was a few years after Inuyasha got cancelled if I remember and I read they either purposely or inadvertently removed Koga.

I generally study animation more than manga. I went through a period in my early-20's where I only wanted to buy and read manga. However, Ranma wasn't one of those. I jumped through the Ranma mangas when I did have them. I read Volumes 1-12 and 29-38. I skipped a big chunk in the middle because I bought a different times.

As I've mentioned before, the story seems to have gotten repetitive in Inuyasha beyond episode 45 and it seems rushed. I'm not really sure how to follow Inuyasha anymore. I'm just trying to make it to the end of the original TV series. I always see Final Act separated even though it is supposed to continue where the cancellation happened on episode 169 or so.
 

Happosai

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It's really not? My whole original statement was that they haven't been totally on model with her style in the anime, and your comparisons don't prove otherwise.

As Happosai said:



and theyre not wrong.

I'm currently going through the series with one of my friends who's never seen before, and every now and then we point this out.
You will see the changes in style moreso in Ranma 1/2 than in Inuyasha. With Inuyasha the first 100 episodes don't change much. The most I can say is that they start removing certain detail to the characters, cutting down on frames, and have a lot of background characters with cloning. Otherwise, it looks different than the manga but the same as the first TV director (they had two directors for the first 169 episodes and the first director actually knew where they were going). With Ranma, there was a lot going on in the nearly 4-years it was airing. Shouta probably pointed out that they cut down in some episodes. You can clearly tell they were animating more fps in earlier episodes. I still have to say I'm amazed that Ranma TV was written away from the manga by the second season and the TV writers did a great job writing episodes the viewer can have fun watching. You're going to read many review sites on Ranma saying to not watch beyond season 2 or season 3. Don't listen to them. The story may be inconclusive but they made it fun throughout all the seasons. The slowest season is 5, in my opinion but I'll let you draw your own conclusions.
 
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Dacon

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You will see the changes in style moreso in Ranma 1/2 than in Inuyasha. With Inuyasha the first 100 episodes don't change much. The most I can say is that they start removing certain detail to the characters, cutting down on frames, and have a lot of background characters with cloning. Otherwise, it looks different than the manga but the same as the first TV director (they had two directors for the first 169 episodes and the first director actually knew where they were going). With Ranma, there was a lot going on in the nearly 4-years it was airing. Shouta probably pointed out that they cut down in some episodes. You can clearly tell they were animating more fps in earlier episodes. I still have to say I'm amazed that Ranma TV was written away from the manga by the second season and the TV writers did a great job writing episodes the viewer can have fun watching. You're going to read many review sites on Ranma saying to not watch beyond season 2 or season 3. Don't listen to them. The story may be inconclusive but they made it fun throughout all the seasons. The slowest season is 5, in my opinion but I'll let you draw your own conclusions.
There are a lot of duds here and there imo, but I still think on the whole it's worth watching all of it.

I think I appreciate the Ranma anime more now, than I did when I was watching it as a kid. I still wish we had gotten more of the story from the manga. I absolutely adore the manga.
 
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Happosai

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There are a lot of duds here and there imo, but I still think on the whole it's worth watching all of it.

I think I appreciate the Ranma anime more now, than I did when I was watching it as a kid. I still wish we had gotten more of the story from the manga. I absolutely adore the manga.
The manga had so much more that I decided to focus on the series instead. I started buying the series as soon as VIZ released the first U.S. boxsets. About the inconclusive stories in both the TV series and the manga, I wrote my own. It's unpublished but I tried to write the characters close to how the TV writers did and put things in real time. Watch the OVAs too if you can. I just started watching them with my wife. They were able to fit a bit more story into the shorter format.
 

Dacon

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The manga had so much more that I decided to focus on the series instead. I started buying the series as soon as VIZ released the first U.S. boxsets. About the inconclusive stories in both the TV series and the manga, I wrote my own. It's unpublished but I tried to write the characters close to how the TV writers did and put things in real time. Watch the OVAs too if you can. I just started watching them with my wife. They were able to fit a bit more story into the shorter format.
Oh I've seen all that, but I must admit the OVAs rub me a bit wrong with the changes in the artstyle.
 
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kunonabi

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Speaking of the Ranma 1/2 anime vs manga the one thing I'll always champion the anime for was Ryoga and Ukyo. They were so much more fun and engaging a pairing there than him and that waste of space he got matched up with in the manga.
 
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Happosai

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Speaking of the Ranma 1/2 anime vs manga the one thing I'll always champion the anime for was Ryoga and Ukyo. They were so much more fun and engaging a pairing there than him and that waste of space he got matched up with in the manga.
They kept that character out of the TV series completely. I put Ukyo and Ryoga together in my sequel series. It's a creative and difficult way of writing but I was more into the TV series likewise.
 
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Shouta

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When did they start digital inking Inuyasha. I've seen movie 1 and I'm up to episode 137 and so far it still looks hand painted. Was it during "Final Act?" Final Act was a few years after Inuyasha got cancelled if I remember and I read they either purposely or inadvertently removed Koga.

I generally study animation more than manga. I went through a period in my early-20's where I only wanted to buy and read manga. However, Ranma wasn't one of those. I jumped through the Ranma mangas when I did have them. I read Volumes 1-12 and 29-38. I skipped a big chunk in the middle because I bought a different times.

As I've mentioned before, the story seems to have gotten repetitive in Inuyasha beyond episode 45 and it seems rushed. I'm not really sure how to follow Inuyasha anymore. I'm just trying to make it to the end of the original TV series. I always see Final Act separated even though it is supposed to continue where the cancellation happened on episode 169 or so.
Episode 99 is when they switched to digital. I spotted it right away when I was looking at the thumbnails on the Viz website for the episodes. Digital has never really replicated the look of cel animation especially with the way the colors are expressed. The opening around those episode was actually digitally done as well so it very much contrasted with the cel look until the transition. Including The Final Act, it was basically half of the series that used Cel and half in digital.
 
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Happosai

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Episode 99 is when they switched to digital. I spotted it right away when I was looking at the thumbnails on the Viz website for the episodes. Digital has never really replicated the look of cel animation especially with the way the colors are expressed. The opening around those episode was actually digitally done as well so it very much contrasted with the cel look until the transition. Including The Final Act, it was basically half of the series that used Cel and half in digital.
digital ink looks nice if it's used from the start of a production. I always liked the crossover look the first seasons of Fututama had. With anime I liked that it looked older and was more traditional. I nearly started a career in animation 12-years ago until the institutions told me they wouldn't be using it after 2010 and I would be making about 15,000 / annual and having to jump from city to city. I couldn't be a part of animation (other than animation I've made from home),so my expectations were that there would always be at least one renegade to push for traditional methods. The sad reality is that they're not going to go back and start doing things manually again. Animation is now something that doesn't require artist talent or ambition. Any average Joe can learn how to use the software and make something out of it. They like that it's faster and cleaner. But, you can't make changes because the human element of variation isn't there anymore. I accept what it is now but choose to watch mostly older animation. There's so much great stuff from the last that still feels new and so much new stuff that just gets old fast.

I encourage people to learn traditional animation before migrating to digital so they know the creative difference.
 
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Happosai

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Ah yes things sure have changed right. I think the demographics certainly have. Anime always had moe, but it wasn't the overwhelmingly dominant content. They were always limited to certain moments, characters, or shows (C-Ko from Project A-ko comes to mind. Even Lynn Minmay of Macross is kinda a proto-moe character). But you're right, anime is as incestuous as ever. One of the reasons Bebop is so great because its creator reached deep into his love for classic western cinema, music, and pop culture (mostly from the 70s) to create something that had super wide appeal. It really takes the right people to make it happen. It's not like Hollywood is cranking out anything other than PG-13 superhero schtick these days so really who's to blame...

Yeah I'm being facetious, Kite is really just Leon the Professional with sex scenes thrown in. If anything it pushed the boundaries, which is what great anime should do. Wicked City is just so beautiful, every shot is perfect. How can that be hentai... The colors, the lighting, my god. It's got Italian Giallo sensibilities like Susperia, or the works of Sezuki Seijun. That's another thing I miss about 80s OVAs, lots of them were filled with shots of surreal and dramatic lighting. That was gone though, even by the late 90s.

What was that doc btw? You got a link? Also reminds me I saw a pretty good dissection about the death of classic anime myself:

Maybe it's because we've been inundated with just modern content, that today's anime viewers don't see the need to reach back. I mean getting your hands on anime use to be so much harder, that people would seek out the good stuff (I remember getting burned CDs of postage stamp resolution anime from friends in the schoolyard, good times). Now there's hundreds of new shows a season at your fingertips (but so much of it crap)...
The first paragraph you are talking about Western pop-culture and general pop-culture's influence on anime in the past. Now, when I get too critical of modern anime; it tends to draw some bad attention. So, I can say that as a whole, I don't like it. I can also say why I can't get into it. However, I want to make sure the this thread doesn't end up like some of the past GAF classic anime threads where there was some warring going on between the different generations of anime. So, back to that pop-cultural influence. Let me ask a question. Who was one of the most renegade and daredevil-type animators in the West of the 1970's? To me...Ralph Bakshi. Ralph Bakshi drew inspiration from pop-culture and classic film to create the crazy stories and elaborate rotoscoped animation in many of his feature films. I would say that it's undeniable that Japanese in the 70's and 80's probably had more of a pull influence from seeing Bakshi's Wizards, Fire & Ice, LoTRs, Cool World, American Pop, and possibly some of his earlier ones too (the one's that were the most extreme).

Someone brought up in this group awhile back in a post how the Japanese had based several characters on a blonde singer (Italian, I believe but I'll have to search for that post). So, it seems no coincidence that early anime liked certain characters to have a European look to them. There's also the art-style of Crying Freeman. The realism in the character design alone is something I've seen in only a handful of older anime. The story is far beyond what I see writers would be willing to push today. Read the manga or watch the OVA. Either way, it's more like watching a piece of Western cinema mixed with Japanese and Chinese influence.

Some obvious parallels can be drawn from BladeRunner and A.D. Police. I get that many OVAs and anime movies in the 80's wanted to include cyberpunk elements that were a hat-tip to BladeRunner. However, I recall an entire scene of a Boomer (similar to a replicant) being chased through a glass window...that's straight out of BladeRunner when the snake charmer replicant is chased by Harrison Ford and breaks through a window.

Let's make this topic bigger.

Take a look at this fanmade BladeRunner poster. Try to think of all the classic anime the characters remind you of. Almost seems like BladeRunner was made in Japan sometimes when I watch it.

 
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