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Samsung DDR6-12800 Memory Currently In Development, GDDR6+ To Offer Up To 24 Gbps & GDDR7 Up To 32 Gbps For Next-Gen GPUs

tusharngf

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Oct 25, 2017
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During its annual tech day, Samsung revealed new information regarding next-gen memory technologies such as DDR6, GDDR6+, GDDR7 & HBM3.

Samsung Beings Development of DDR6 & GDDR6+ Memory Technologies, Also Talks GDDR7 & HBM3 Standards For Next-Gen GPUs​

Computerbase managed to get hold of the information from Samsung who discussed the next-gen memory standards. The most recent leap in the memory design came with the launch of DDR5. The standard is now up and operational on Intel's 12th Gen Alder Lake platform & while there are some major issues with supply, memory makers aren't stopping in refining DDR5. Samsung has outlined native JEDEC speeds of DDR5-6400 Mbps & overclocked module speeds of DDR5-8500 Mbps in the near future. Currently, memory makers have teased up to 7000 Mbps transfer speeds with initially produced DDR5 DIMMs but that will get better with time.

DDR6 Memory Standard In-Development - Up To 17,000 Mbps Transfer Speeds

Enter DDR6, the next-generation memory standard is said to be already in development and will replace DDR5 in the future. Since DDR5 only just launched, we shouldn't expect DDR6 till at least 2025-2026+. The DDR4 memory standard stayed with us for at least 6 years so we should expect the same timeframe for DDR6's launch.


GDDR6+ With 24 Gbps & GDDR7 With 32 Gbps For Next-Gen GPUs

Samsung also revealed its plans to offer a faster GDDR6+ standard which will replace the existing GDDR6 chips. Currently, Micron is the only one that has designs for 21 Gbps+ graphics memory ready with its GDDR6X standard. GDDR6+ is more of a refinement of GDDR6 than just upping the bandwidth. It is said to rock speeds of up to 24 Gbps and will be part of the next generation of GPUs. This will allow GPUs with 320/352/384 bit bus layouts to reach over 1 TB/s bandwidth while 256-bit GPUs will be able to reach up to 768 GB/s bandwidth.

GDDR Memory Specifications:​

FeatureGDDR5GDDR5XGDDR6GDDR6XGDDR6+GDDR7
DensityFrom 512Mb to 8Gb8Gb8Gb, 16Gb8Gb, 16Gb8Gb, 16Gb8Gb, 16Gb, 32Gb?
VDD and VDDQEither 1.5V or 1.35V1.35VEither 1.35V or 1.25VEither 1.35V or 1.25VTBDTBD
VPPN/A1.8V1.8V1.8V1.8VTBD
Data ratesUp to 8 Gb/sUp to 12Gb/sUp to 16 Gb/s19 Gb/s, 21 Gb/s,
>21 Gb/s
24 Gb/s32 Gb/s
PackageBGA-170
14mm x 12mm 0.8mm ball pitch
BGA-190
14mm x 12mm 0.65mm ball pitch
BGA-180
14mm x 12mm 0.75mm ball pitch
BGA-180
14mm x 12mm 0.75mm ball pitch
BGA-180
14mm x 12mm 0.75mm ball pitch?
TBD
I/O widthx32/x16x32/x162 ch x16/x82 ch x16/x82 ch x16/x8TBD



Source: Samsung DDR6-12800 Memory Currently In Development, GDDR6+ To Offer Up To 24 Gbps & GDDR7 Up To 32 Gbps For Next-Gen GPUs (wccftech.com)
 

Kataploom

Member
Jan 30, 2014
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Any chance of seeing any of this on series 4000 or new amd series?
DDR6? Zero, we're just about to get DDR5 and memory modules types do not change too frequently, they will last years before a module upgrade in the industry, they probably started developing DDR6 so they can be ready in like... 5 to 8 years or so...

That being said, are people using the new Intel CPUs using DDR5 getting 4800 MT/s memories to make such a difference against current Ryzen 9? because if so, memory probably isn't giving enough of an advantage imo
 
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iHaunter

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DDR6? Zero, we're just about to get DDR5 and memory modules types do not change too frequently, they will last years before a module upgrade in the industry, they probably started developing DDR6 so they can be ready in like... 5 to 8 years or so...

That being said, are people using the new Intel CPUs using DDR5 getting 4800 MT/s memories to make such a difference against current Ryzen 9? because if so, memory probably isn't giving enough of an advantage imo
We're def getting 6 already. It's kinda nuts. We had DDR3/4 for so long. Then BAM, 5, 6 so rapidly. Crazy how demand dictates innovation.
 

Kataploom

Member
Jan 30, 2014
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We're def getting 6 already. It's kinda nuts. We had DDR3/4 for so long. Then BAM, 5, 6 so rapidly. Crazy how demand dictates innovation.
Da fuq? More or less when are we expecting to have them on stores? Cause if that's true DDR5 is not worth it... Tho I don't believe that
 

iHaunter

Member
Sep 6, 2015
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Da fuq? More or less when are we expecting to have them on stores? Cause if that's true DDR5 is not worth it... Tho I don't believe that
Hard to say, but DDR6 isn't too far off. I haven't upgraded my PC for a while because I've heard rumors about it. Buddy of mine is a CPU Architect for Intel. My ex-boss is VP for CPU division whom I still talk to.

I'm waiting for it. i9 9900k still holding out. Granted I had to OC it to 5.5Ghz.
 
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Dirk Benedict

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We can only hope that by the time those hit the market, chip supply has stabilized and scales can go f off. Wishful thinking, i know..

I think part of what affected GPU availability, especially in America, was the fact everyone and their mom could afford a GPU because of free money. Now what I see (from what I CAN SEE) is that a lot of that money is no longer in the hands of those people, so while I feel that's behind us, supply constraints have hit because of COVID and things are moving slower coupled with the labor shortage. Miners also being a factor as well as big companies like Apple hogging up wafers. The chip supply isn't as simple as some people think, China also a factor.
 

CuNi

Member
Sep 4, 2014
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I think part of what affected GPU availability, especially in America, was the fact everyone and their mom could afford a GPU because of free money. Now what I see (from what I CAN SEE) is that a lot of that money is no longer in the hands of those people, so while I feel that's behind us, supply constraints have hit because of COVID and things are moving slower coupled with the labor shortage. Miners also being a factor as well as big companies like Apple hogging up wafers. The chip supply isn't as simple as some people think, China also a factor.

I know, and many chip foundries and even prominent buyers of those chips speculate the shortage to continue for at least into 2023/24 if not longer. Obviously capacity doesn't poof into existence out of nowhere and those things take time. I just hope that by the time those standards hit mass production, that the long term plans from today to increase capacity going forward will start to bear fruits and supply routes have had the time to be adjusted accordingly.
I'd hope to see price move back down again towards pre-covid prices starting end of 2024 and hopefully normalize by 2025, 2026 at the latest, just in time for (hopefully) mass production start of those new specs.

Donald Trump GIF by CBS News

It's a fucking ram. nobody cares. It never made any difference

Incredibly uninformed post.
Obviously it doesn't effect FPS in such a major way like CPU or GPU Upgrades, but it does affect FPS nonetheless.
There is even in todays time already a measurable difference in for example 1x 16GB RAM vs 2x 8GB RAM and that is without even taking account what different RAM timings and speeds do.
 
Last edited:

BusierDonkey

Member
Sep 21, 2018
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Donald Trump GIF by CBS News

It's a fucking ram. nobody cares. It never made any difference


It's not a massive difference, but there is a difference. 3200 to 4400 is a notable leap in many games, some times in the double digits.

If you're playing locked to 60fps you won't see a benefit but players looking to eek out another few FPS will benefit from faster modules.
 
Last edited:
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Mar 7, 2017
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During its annual tech day, Samsung revealed new information regarding next-gen memory technologies such as DDR6, GDDR6+, GDDR7 & HBM3.

Samsung Beings Development of DDR6 & GDDR6+ Memory Technologies, Also Talks GDDR7 & HBM3 Standards For Next-Gen GPUs​

Computerbase managed to get hold of the information from Samsung who discussed the next-gen memory standards. The most recent leap in the memory design came with the launch of DDR5. The standard is now up and operational on Intel's 12th Gen Alder Lake platform & while there are some major issues with supply, memory makers aren't stopping in refining DDR5. Samsung has outlined native JEDEC speeds of DDR5-6400 Mbps & overclocked module speeds of DDR5-8500 Mbps in the near future. Currently, memory makers have teased up to 7000 Mbps transfer speeds with initially produced DDR5 DIMMs but that will get better with time.

DDR6 Memory Standard In-Development - Up To 17,000 Mbps Transfer Speeds

Enter DDR6, the next-generation memory standard is said to be already in development and will replace DDR5 in the future. Since DDR5 only just launched, we shouldn't expect DDR6 till at least 2025-2026+. The DDR4 memory standard stayed with us for at least 6 years so we should expect the same timeframe for DDR6's launch.


GDDR6+ With 24 Gbps & GDDR7 With 32 Gbps For Next-Gen GPUs

Samsung also revealed its plans to offer a faster GDDR6+ standard which will replace the existing GDDR6 chips. Currently, Micron is the only one that has designs for 21 Gbps+ graphics memory ready with its GDDR6X standard. GDDR6+ is more of a refinement of GDDR6 than just upping the bandwidth. It is said to rock speeds of up to 24 Gbps and will be part of the next generation of GPUs. This will allow GPUs with 320/352/384 bit bus layouts to reach over 1 TB/s bandwidth while 256-bit GPUs will be able to reach up to 768 GB/s bandwidth.

GDDR Memory Specifications:​

FeatureGDDR5GDDR5XGDDR6GDDR6XGDDR6+GDDR7
DensityFrom 512Mb to 8Gb8Gb8Gb, 16Gb8Gb, 16Gb8Gb, 16Gb8Gb, 16Gb, 32Gb?
VDD and VDDQEither 1.5V or 1.35V1.35VEither 1.35V or 1.25VEither 1.35V or 1.25VTBDTBD
VPPN/A1.8V1.8V1.8V1.8VTBD
Data ratesUp to 8 Gb/sUp to 12Gb/sUp to 16 Gb/s19 Gb/s, 21 Gb/s,
>21 Gb/s
24 Gb/s32 Gb/s
PackageBGA-170
14mm x 12mm 0.8mm ball pitch
BGA-190
14mm x 12mm 0.65mm ball pitch
BGA-180
14mm x 12mm 0.75mm ball pitch
BGA-180
14mm x 12mm 0.75mm ball pitch
BGA-180
14mm x 12mm 0.75mm ball pitch?
TBD
I/O widthx32/x16x32/x162 ch x16/x82 ch x16/x82 ch x16/x8TBD



Source: Samsung DDR6-12800 Memory Currently In Development, GDDR6+ To Offer Up To 24 Gbps & GDDR7 Up To 32 Gbps For Next-Gen GPUs (wccftech.com)

This is more like it!!!!
 

Skifi28

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Jun 28, 2020
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"Did you just upgrade to DDR5? Yeah, it's already old news, tough luck. Did you only recently upgrade to DDR4? Haha, sucker"

Anyone else get the feeling sometimes PC tech moves a bit too fast?
 
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"Did you just upgrade to DDR5? Yeah, it's already old news, tough luck. Did you only recently upgrade to DDR4? Haha, sucker"

Anyone else get the feeling sometimes PC tech moves a bit too fast?
same with PCIE. it feels like we only just got PCIE 4 and now we're suddenly on 5.0? lol
 
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CuNi

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Sep 4, 2014
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"Did you just upgrade to DDR5? Yeah, it's already old news, tough luck. Did you only recently upgrade to DDR4? Haha, sucker"

Anyone else get the feeling sometimes PC tech moves a bit too fast?

I think it comes down to what one wants to have in his rig.
Like if you want to be always the first in tech, you gotta get there in day 1, you pay a premium and usually as tech matures the tech even gets better and cheaper at the same time!
But if you want to stay more budged friendly, you can always go in late into a tech and get refined processes, good performance for a all time low at the cost of being superseded by the new tech soon.

Edit: One cannot stay "on top of the performance" without having to swap parts every year. CPUs get a refresher these days after ~1 year market time before ~6-12 months later the next architecture releases.
GPU also usually get a ~1 year TI/SUPER/AMD equivalent refresher before being superseded by the next Series 1 year later. RAM gets faster frequencies, densities and better Timings on a bi-yearly cycle... if not faster.
Mainboards having new chipsets/revision/configurations release yearly too. Storage density/speeds and specs change yearly too.
 
Last edited:
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Deanington

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Jul 15, 2018
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Can we at least try DDR5, which I think I made a mistake by preordering/purchasing a 12700k. Pretty much a paper weight right now, even still early for DDR5.
 

Dirk Benedict

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May 31, 2013
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I know, and many chip foundries and even prominent buyers of those chips speculate the shortage to continue for at least into 2023/24 if not longer. Obviously capacity doesn't poof into existence out of nowhere and those things take time. I just hope that by the time those standards hit mass production, that the long term plans from today to increase capacity going forward will start to bear fruits and supply routes have had the time to be adjusted accordingly.
I'd hope to see price move back down again towards pre-covid prices starting end of 2024 and hopefully normalize by 2025, 2026 at the latest, just in time for (hopefully) mass production start of those new specs.



Incredibly uninformed post.
Obviously it doesn't effect FPS in such a major way like CPU or GPU Upgrades, but it does affect FPS nonetheless.
There is even in todays time already a measurable difference in for example 1x 16GB RAM vs 2x 8GB RAM and that is without even taking account what different RAM timings and speeds do.

We still should worry... because apparently China controls about 40-60% of the rare Earths that make up chip creation. I also think that is why they have accelerated their Space plans, because that will be the next place to obtain a boon of rare Metals/Earths
 

Dirk Benedict

Member
May 31, 2013
4,047
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930
Fetid, rotted, cursed Isz
"Did you just upgrade to DDR5? Yeah, it's already old news, tough luck. Did you only recently upgrade to DDR4? Haha, sucker"

Anyone else get the feeling sometimes PC tech moves a bit too fast?

I upgraded during the end of DDR4, I feel no regret. Especially since I know how fast tech moves. I got tired of waiting. My rig is awesome and it chews through everything. The only thing I regret is not holding out for a 3090.... the card I saved for in the first place. I honestly think I deserved to get one, because, I am not a miner, for one, and also I tried 3 different times to wait outside of various stores... I wanted it for gaming performance... and that chunky 24GB VRAM. I spent several months trying to get a 3090... even at inflated price..
 
Last edited:
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rnlval

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During its annual tech day, Samsung revealed new information regarding next-gen memory technologies such as DDR6, GDDR6+, GDDR7 & HBM3.

Samsung Beings Development of DDR6 & GDDR6+ Memory Technologies, Also Talks GDDR7 & HBM3 Standards For Next-Gen GPUs​

Computerbase managed to get hold of the information from Samsung who discussed the next-gen memory standards. The most recent leap in the memory design came with the launch of DDR5. The standard is now up and operational on Intel's 12th Gen Alder Lake platform & while there are some major issues with supply, memory makers aren't stopping in refining DDR5. Samsung has outlined native JEDEC speeds of DDR5-6400 Mbps & overclocked module speeds of DDR5-8500 Mbps in the near future. Currently, memory makers have teased up to 7000 Mbps transfer speeds with initially produced DDR5 DIMMs but that will get better with time.

DDR6 Memory Standard In-Development - Up To 17,000 Mbps Transfer Speeds

Enter DDR6, the next-generation memory standard is said to be already in development and will replace DDR5 in the future. Since DDR5 only just launched, we shouldn't expect DDR6 till at least 2025-2026+. The DDR4 memory standard stayed with us for at least 6 years so we should expect the same timeframe for DDR6's launch.


GDDR6+ With 24 Gbps & GDDR7 With 32 Gbps For Next-Gen GPUs

Samsung also revealed its plans to offer a faster GDDR6+ standard which will replace the existing GDDR6 chips. Currently, Micron is the only one that has designs for 21 Gbps+ graphics memory ready with its GDDR6X standard. GDDR6+ is more of a refinement of GDDR6 than just upping the bandwidth. It is said to rock speeds of up to 24 Gbps and will be part of the next generation of GPUs. This will allow GPUs with 320/352/384 bit bus layouts to reach over 1 TB/s bandwidth while 256-bit GPUs will be able to reach up to 768 GB/s bandwidth.

GDDR Memory Specifications:​

FeatureGDDR5GDDR5XGDDR6GDDR6XGDDR6+GDDR7
DensityFrom 512Mb to 8Gb8Gb8Gb, 16Gb8Gb, 16Gb8Gb, 16Gb8Gb, 16Gb, 32Gb?
VDD and VDDQEither 1.5V or 1.35V1.35VEither 1.35V or 1.25VEither 1.35V or 1.25VTBDTBD
VPPN/A1.8V1.8V1.8V1.8VTBD
Data ratesUp to 8 Gb/sUp to 12Gb/sUp to 16 Gb/s19 Gb/s, 21 Gb/s,
>21 Gb/s
24 Gb/s32 Gb/s
PackageBGA-170
14mm x 12mm 0.8mm ball pitch
BGA-190
14mm x 12mm 0.65mm ball pitch
BGA-180
14mm x 12mm 0.75mm ball pitch
BGA-180
14mm x 12mm 0.75mm ball pitch
BGA-180
14mm x 12mm 0.75mm ball pitch?
TBD
I/O widthx32/x16x32/x162 ch x16/x82 ch x16/x82 ch x16/x8TBD



Source: Samsung DDR6-12800 Memory Currently In Development, GDDR6+ To Offer Up To 24 Gbps & GDDR7 Up To 32 Gbps For Next-Gen GPUs (wccftech.com)

NAVI 21's 128 MB infinity Cache (L3 cache) was the workaround against the GDDR6-16000 production cost, product availability, and bandwidth issue i.e. AMD wasn't willing to spend on another Hawaii XT's 512-bit bus GDDRx PCB and 16 chips count.

Some NAVI 21 XTXH SKUs have the 18 Gbps data rate GDDR6 i.e. GDDR6-18000. https://hothardware.com/news/amdradeon-rx-6900-xt-liquid-cooled-coming-soon-with-18gbps-gddr6

Expect NAVI 31 with a larger infinity cache.
 
Last edited:
Mar 17, 2020
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DDR6? Zero, we're just about to get DDR5 and memory modules types do not change too frequently, they will last years before a module upgrade in the industry, they probably started developing DDR6 so they can be ready in like... 5 to 8 years or so...

That being said, are people using the new Intel CPUs using DDR5 getting 4800 MT/s memories to make such a difference against current Ryzen 9? because if so, memory probably isn't giving enough of an advantage imo
GGGGGGDDR