Seattle and Mt. Rainier.

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#1
People in the past made a point to point out that New Orleans isn't the best city location being below sea level in Hurricane territory. But what of Seattle and Mt. Rainier? If that thing goes off like St. Helens the city is pretty much done for.

Anyone in Seattle GAF have a thought about this?
 
#2
People in the past made a point to point out that New Orleans isn't the best city location being below sea level in Hurricane territory. But what of Seattle and Mt. Rainier? If that thing goes off like St. Helens the city is pretty much done for.

Anyone in Seattle GAF have a thought about this?
It's not that big of a deal. Hypothetically speaking if it blows the farthest it gets is Auburn WA. Most likely it ends somewhere between Renton and Kent WA.

https://maps.google.com/maps?oe=utf...gl=us&ei=fB4jUOevEsH7igKT7IDQCA&ved=0CKABELYD

You can kind of see where those city are from Seattle.

There's also escape route already marked out and everything. I remember taking a geology class in college and the professor went over everything.

The worst is obviously the mud slide that follows.
 
#5
It's not that big of a deal. Hypothetically speaking if it blows the farthest it gets is Auburn WA.

There's also escape route already marked out and everything. I remember taking a geology class in college and the professor went over everything.

The worst is obviously the mud slide that follows.
This is correct. Actual tephra from any eruption likely wouldn't even get close to Seattle. Mudslides could spread quite far and do damage, however.

Also, of course, if a significant amount of ash was released, that could have a severe national effect.
 
#7
This is correct. Actual tephra from any eruption likely wouldn't even get close to Seattle. Mudslides could spread quite far and do damage, however.

Also, of course, if a significant amount of ash was released, that could have a severe national effect.
Well it is only wikipedia but they have this to say,

Not only is there much ice atop the volcano, the volcano is also slowly being weakened by hydrothermal activity. According to Geoff Clayton, a geologist with a Washington State Geology firm, RH2 Engineering, a repeat of the Osceola mudflow would destroy Enumclaw, Orting, Kent, Auburn, Puyallup, Sumner and all of Renton.[25] Such a mudflow might also reach down the Duwamish estuary and destroy parts of downtown Seattle, and cause tsunamis in Puget Sound and Lake Washington.
 
#9
i drove out to mt. rainier a couple months ago, was awesome. it's crazy that in seattle you look at it and its so big and HUGE and just seems like its right there, but then you get in a car and it takes a couple of hours to actually get to it. impressive mountain.
 
#11
Here in Vancouver we have the large mountain chains but there is something majestic about the lone large mountains of Baker and Rainier.
 
#12
Well it is only wikipedia but they have this to say,
The Osceola mudflow was the most catastrophic mud flow from Mt Rainier in the last 10,000 yr, and was over 10x as large as any other known lahar (mud flow). It would really need to be a humongous flow to even approach Osceola levels.
 
#14
I live 5 miles outside the park entrance for Mt. Rainier. You can't worry about some stuff man. If it ever does erupt, I will accept my warm lava-y fate with open arms.
 
#15
I live 5 miles outside the park entrance for Mt. Rainier. You can't worry about some stuff man. If it ever does erupt, I will accept my warm lava-y fate with open arms.
lava wont kill you. it's the shock wave of acidic air that melts your flesh and burns out your lungs that you have to worry about. just remember to strike a pose before you get hit like the guy below having one last wank.

 
#18
lava wont kill you. it's the shock wave of acidic air that melts your flesh and burns out your lungs that you have to worry about. just remember to strike a pose before you get hit like the guy below having one last wank.

i've seen that dude!!! pompeii had some creepy shit.. like moms trying to shelter their babies and stuff. yeedch
 
#21
were you in the park? someday i want to hike the whole wonderland trail which goes all the way around the mountain. five days or so.
It is an amazing hike! I don't think you'd be able to knock it out in five days. It has 22,000 feet of elevation gain over 93 miles. That is like summiting Rainier 2.5 times.




9-12 days is average.
 

The Technomancer

card-carrying scientician
#22
were you in the park? someday i want to hike the whole wonderland trail which goes all the way around the mountain. five days or so.
I don't remember the exact geography (we did a fair amount of driving between Rainier and St. Helens to get the best hiking in) but we did a bunch of hiking in the middle of the rainforest and an entire day in the lava tube caverns.
 
#26
If anything, those living in Tacoma (me) would be affected greatly by the eruption of Mt. Rainier.

We're a city of ~200,000 30 miles south of Seattle.
 
#30
It's Russian Roulette with the trigger being pulled every few hundred years. It will destroy a generation while leaving dozens of others to bask in the splendor of the mountain.

Of course, in the Pacific Northwest we don't have droughts, cold snaps, heat waves, hurricanes, tornadoes or any other natural calamity as other regions of the United States face on a regular basis. Living in the shadow of Mt. Rainier for most of my life, I'll take my chances with the mountain.
 
#31
lava wont kill you. it's the shock wave of acidic air that melts your flesh and burns out your lungs that you have to worry about. just remember to strike a pose before you get hit like the guy below having one last wank.

I was already cracking up when I saw your tag.
 
#32
Yeah, Seattle wouldn't be affected much by this. Tacoma, on the other hand... :|

I'm more concerned about an Earthquake hitting the Seattle area soon.
I hate earthquakes. We don't have them very often (it's been eleven years since the last significant one) but they always cause quite a stir.
 
#33
People in the past made a point to point out that New Orleans isn't the best city location being below sea level in Hurricane territory. But what of Seattle and Mt. Rainier? If that thing goes off like St. Helens the city is pretty much done for.

Anyone in Seattle GAF have a thought about this?
And if Yellow Stone ever explodes again (for which it is apparently several thousand years overdue) a lot more than Seattle were going to be gone. Life on Earth has its inherent risks. I'd rather live in the shadow of a dormant volcano than in the path of a hurricane.
 
#35
The only thing I miss about living in Olympia 6 years ago was the gorgeous view I had in my 6th story apt. As soon as you opened the blinds, BAM! Mt. Rainier...such a beautiful sight to wake up to. And when I lived in Mukilteo(near Everett) back in 2000 on a clear dayw my family could see Mt. Baker.
 
#42
Throw me in with the tacoma crowd. Don't worry tacoma gaf, I will stand in front of it and say "You Shall not Pass!" and save tacoma.
 

richiek

steals Justin Bieber DVDs
#43
lava wont kill you. it's the shock wave of acidic air that melts your flesh and burns out your lungs that you have to worry about. just remember to strike a pose before you get hit like the guy below having one last wank.



So that's why Darth Vader needs an iron lung.
 
#45
I live in the Puyallup area and it still amazes me every time when I get off the freeway in the South Hill area and Rainier is filling the entire horizon. It is so beautiful.
 
#48
The only thing I miss about living in Olympia 6 years ago was the gorgeous view I had in my 6th story apt. As soon as you opened the blinds, BAM! Mt. Rainier...such a beautiful sight to wake up to. And when I lived in Mukilteo(near Everett) back in 2000 on a clear dayw my family could see Mt. Baker.
Rainier beats Baker any day, though. Sorry, Dad, but my Mountain is cooler than yours.

Which reminds me of a terrible joke!

According to ancient camping legend, Mt. Rainier was once married to Mt. St. Helens. But as we all know, Rainier is often covered in clouds, and it lost sight of its wife. When at last the clouds parted, Mt. St. Helens saw Mt. Rainier with Mt. Baker. Then she blew up.

I said it was terrible!
 
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