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Retro Trailer SEGA's Toshihiro Nagoshi talks about the origins and evolution of the Yakuza series (Archipel)

May 9, 2019
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Sega’s CCO Toshihiro Nagoshi was featured in the latest Archipel video interview video to talk about the Yakuza series’s origins and evolution.

Check out the interview video “Toshihiro Nagoshi, the Yakuza years” below:



The Yakuza series celebrates its 15th anniversary this year, with over 12 million copies sold worldwide. In the latest of Archipel’s “Caravan” series, the head of Ryu Ga Gotoku Studio, Toshihiro Nagoshi, recollected on the origins of Yakuza. Nagoshi starts by talking about the Japanese game industry’s state at the time.

At first, Nagoshi wanted something aimed towards a worldwide audience. He wanted a game that would please both men and women. Moreover, he wanted something that could reach a target audience of kids to adults, if possible. While he felt that Nintendo could have handled the task, he wanted to pursue something that felt closer to their identity.

To do so meant having to give up on a few of their earlier goals. The first was to give up focusing on the worldwide audience part and instead focus on the Japanese audience. The next part dropped was the need for a younger audience. The third major point was when the team decided it was okay if women didn’t like the games. This led the team to focus on making games for adult Japanese men. After narrowing down the themes, Sega went with one that involved “outlaws in Japan,” and the rest was history.

The first Yakuza game was Ryu ga Gotoku for the PlayStation 2, released in Japan on December 8, 2005. The latest entry, Yakuza: Like a Dragon, is available on the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Xbox Series X, and PC. The PlayStation 5 version will arrive on March 2, 2021.

 

Fat Frog

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A great news for me.
I think they'll allocate a small team for Kenzan/Ishin remakes but after the next mainline Yakuza they'll try another genre.
 
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sublimit

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I think they'll allocate a small team for Kenzan/Ishin remakes but after the next mainline Yakuza they'll try another genre.
Don't give people false hopes lol

But yeah sounds very interesting to try their hands on new genres as long as they don't plaster the name "Yakuza 8" on the cover like they did with Like a Dragon.
 
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RAIDEN1

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This reminds me to continue on with Yakuza Zero..good job it is on GamePass!
 

Arkam

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Here, Now and maybe later
This reminds me to continue on with Yakuza Zero..good job it is on GamePass!
Im playing that too (on PS5 though). Great story... weak as fuck gameplay though. Combat is just infuriating and feels clunkier than a Rock'em Sock'em robot fight. Coming straight from Spider-Man to this is jarring. But damn does th story make me want to press on through.
 

RAIDEN1

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Im playing that too (on PS5 though). Great story... weak as fuck gameplay though. Combat is just infuriating and feels clunkier than a Rock'em Sock'em robot fight. Coming straight from Spider-Man to this is jarring. But damn does th story make me want to press on through.
The biggest immersion breaker for me though is that NONE of the character look like they were taken from out of 1988, more like 1998! They should have used Vice City as inspiration...

 

YCoCg

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The biggest immersion breaker for me though is that NONE of the character look like they were taken from out of 1988, mor
This is 1980's Japan not 1980's Britain and America, the styles are very different.
 

RAIDEN1

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This is 1980's Japan not 1980's Britain and America, the styles are very different.
I am on about music wise, British and American pop surely made its way to the shores of Japan in the 80s...the way the characters are dressed and overall look doesn't give the impression that they are from that era...I think this video is more appropriate in what sort of music should have been in it: