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Someone Came into my Apartment while I was Sleeping

Peggies

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This thread started with some creepy pasta (actually it was more of an odd pasta) and now it's like:

Independence Day Reaction GIF by Black Rifle Coffee Company
 

Mista K

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Hell yeah, lets just stop locking our doors and start blasting.
A gun stops them from breaking in when you are home, which is a lot safer. Almost no one breaks in where I live because they know they’ll get shot. That’s why they case your house to make sure you’re away
 
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G Boaty

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A gun stops them from breaking in when you are home, which is a lot safer. Almost no one breaks in where I live because they know they’ll get shot. That’s why they case your house to make sure you’re away

A gun doesn't stop anyone from breaking into anything. How does someone breaking into your home know if you have a gun before they break in? Do you just advertise it outside your house? If so then that just proves you don't need to have a gun, you can just pretend to have one and it's just as effective.
 

V4skunk

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This literally came happened a few hours ago and I’m still in shock/trauma/just scared.

Friend and I decided to room together and rented an apartment about a month ago. The apartment is located in a gentrifying area, basically not as nice as a suburb but not too bad for a place that’s close to the scene/downtown all the bars/clubs. It’s supposed to be pretty safe, but just the nature of the area I do take out all of my important belongings from the car but I never imagined something like this could happen.

It was getting late, about 1am and I’m just watching YouTube/reading some articles on my iPad. My roommate is out of town for a couple of days so it’s just me in the apartment. I ended up passing out around 1:30am I think. About an hour later I wake up because I’m hearing some noise/ruffling (I’m a very light sleeper). I open my eyes as I’m lying on my back and I literally see some guy crouched over next to my bed in my room using his flashlight on his phone to peer through my window. I couldn’t believe it...I had to be in a dream, no way this could be real. I just keep staring at his figure, still trying to decide if this was real or not. He hasn’t noticed me and I’m hoping it is something where if it’s a dream I’m about to wake up, or he’s not really after me and he’s just there for my belongings/he’d leave me alone. Then he started moving his flashlight over my bed towards me until he got to see my face with my eyes open. I just calmly say “hey what’s up man”. I can see his eyebrows rise, lines on his forehead probably because he was shocked that I was awake. I’m not going to lie, in this moment I’ve never been more scared in my life - if this is how it was going to end, I didn’t want to leave behind my mom, my siblings. I just couldn’t believe this was real. The guy slowly got up from his crouched position and quickly made his way out of my room silently and I heard a light thud which I believed to be the door. It’s 2:40am, I just froze for the next 10 min praying he was gone and deciding what my next move should be. I didn’t know if he was still in the apartment or not. Finally I just grabbed my phone which was right next to me, and decided to run for the apartment door (right next to my room so I should be able to get out in case if he was still inside).

I had a friend who lived in the same complex and I ran to his apartment. I kept banging on his door/window to let me in or help me. I didn’t want to go back to the apartment myself...amazingly my friend is such a deep sleeper he couldn’t wake up from my 20 phone calls, door/window banging, his own dog barking, etc. I ended up staying and crouching by his apartment door throughout the night.

Now it’s about 7am with the sun out and my friend still sleeping I decided to brave it out and return to the apartment. I still wasn’t 100% sure if it was real or not...I opened my apartment door and I noticed the patio door was open too. He must’ve slipped out through the patio door which may or may not have been left unlocked by me (I’m hoping it was just left unlocked by me, would me much worse if he somehow had keys). I inspected the apartment and none of my belongings were taken and person seemed to have left after all. I am 100% sure someone was there. I usually leave one light open in the living area during nights but all lights were turned off when I got back. Also, the iPhone chargers which has wiring that you can easily walk through when going to the patio were out of the outlets - he may have slipped through these whenever he entered/escaped through the patio.

I’m not sure what to do next really, I’ve never been more scared. I’m just grateful to be alive and get to see my family, friends, even gaf....I have this very bad urge to cry right now. I’m a mid 20s male who hasn’t cried in years
I would have fucking wiped them out.
I have weapons all over my home.
 

DeepBreath87

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A gun doesn't stop anyone from breaking into anything. How does someone breaking into your home know if you have a gun before they break in? Do you just advertise it outside your house? If so then that just proves you don't need to have a gun, you can just pretend to have one and it's just as effective.
It’s the threat of the gun. If you think there is a 50/50 chance the house your about to break into has a gun, unless you’re completely insane, you aren’t breaking in.

The same argument pacifists use to defend not needing a gun, ie most home invaders want your stuff, not you, is the reason they’re not going to break in if they think you have a gun. It changes to risk/benefit calculation. Home invaders don’t want to get shot. Guns being fairly ubiquitous means they have to operate under the assumption you do have a gun.

It’s really a simple question. If someone was breaking into your family’s home, would you want to have a gun or not?
 
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G Boaty

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It’s the threat of the gun. If you think there is a 50/50 chance the house your about to break into has a gun, unless you’re completely insane, you aren’t breaking in.

The same argument pacifists use to defend not needing a gun, ie most home invaders want your stuff, not you, is the reason they’re not going to break in if they think you have a gun. It changes to risk/benefit calculation. Home invaders don’t want to get shot. Guns being fairly ubiquitous means they have to operate under the assumption you do have a gun.

It’s really a simple question. If someone was breaking into your family’s home, would you want to have a gun or not?

They have no way of knowing if you have a gun or not. If the "threat" of a gun is all you need, then you don't need a gun.

And no I wouldn't want a gun. If I thought there was a chance someone could easily break into my home, I'd take steps to correct that. A gun doesn't make it harder for someone to break into your house. Security systems/cameras, visible alarms, heavy duty locks/bolts on doors, window shields etc. These are all provably effective at stopping someone from entering your home. If you care about protecting your family, getting a gun should be near the bottom of the list of steps you take
 

manfestival

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They have no way of knowing if you have a gun or not. If the "threat" of a gun is all you need, then you don't need a gun.

And no I wouldn't want a gun. If I thought there was a chance someone could easily break into my home, I'd take steps to correct that. A gun doesn't make it harder for someone to break into your house. Security systems/cameras, visible alarms, heavy duty locks/bolts on doors, window shields etc. These are all provably effective at stopping someone from entering your home. If you care about protecting your family, getting a gun should be near the bottom of the list of steps you take
I completely disagree with the notion of the threat of a gun being all that you need. If that were true then things would be far more different than they actually are. Yes the possibility does cause pause and even reduces crime in some instances but it does not stop the crime completely. Otherwise, we wouldn't have videos of people defending their homes from home invasions.
 

G Boaty

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I completely disagree with the notion of the threat of a gun being all that you need. If that were true then things would be far more different than they actually are. Yes the possibility does cause pause and even reduces crime in some instances but it does not stop the crime completely. Otherwise, we wouldn't have videos of people defending their homes from home invasions.

Having a gun doesn't stop all break-ins either. The videos you're talking about are evidence of what I'm saying, which is having a gun doesn't prevent break-ins. Better home security does a much better job of stopping someone from breaking into your house than keeping a gun beside your bed.
 
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They have no way of knowing if you have a gun or not. If the "threat" of a gun is all you need, then you don't need a gun.

And no I wouldn't want a gun. If I thought there was a chance someone could easily break into my home, I'd take steps to correct that. A gun doesn't make it harder for someone to break into your house. Security systems/cameras, visible alarms, heavy duty locks/bolts on doors, window shields etc. These are all provably effective at stopping someone from entering your home. If you care about protecting your family, getting a gun should be near the bottom of the list of steps you take

Yes, it's much more practical and beneficial to your family and to yourself to spend thousands of dollars turning your home into Alcatraz. Retinal scanners, fingerprint verification, voice sample analysis, triple bolt locks. You'll never get burgled, 60% of the time, it will be too much of a pain in the ass for YOU to even get into your house. If the argument is that guns are for people who are paranoid pro-violence, then I don't see how rigging your front door with a number pad is any less paranoid.
 

StormCell

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They have no way of knowing if you have a gun or not. If the "threat" of a gun is all you need, then you don't need a gun.

And no I wouldn't want a gun. If I thought there was a chance someone could easily break into my home, I'd take steps to correct that. A gun doesn't make it harder for someone to break into your house. Security systems/cameras, visible alarms, heavy duty locks/bolts on doors, window shields etc. These are all provably effective at stopping someone from entering your home. If you care about protecting your family, getting a gun should be near the bottom of the list of steps you take

Pfff. You really don't even need any of that. Empirical evidence has shown that simply the threat of a security system is sufficient at detouring criminals. All I have is an ADT sign in my yard that I stole from a house two blocks over, and I've had no prowlers on my property since.
 

G Boaty

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Yes, it's much more practical and beneficial to your family and to yourself to spend thousands of dollars turning your home into Alcatraz. Retinal scanners, fingerprint verification, voice sample analysis, triple bolt locks. You'll never get burgled, 60% of the time, it will be too much of a pain in the ass for YOU to even get into your house. If the argument is that guns are for people who are paranoid pro-violence, then I don't see how rigging your front door with a number pad is any less paranoid.
The post I made was in a direct response to someone talking about protecting their family. You're basically just saying that protecting your family is only worth it if it's convenient.

I have extra bolts on our doors that we can use, doesn't make it any more difficult for us to get into the house, since they can only be set when you're already inside. We have visible security cameras and alarms, a gate that can be locked and windows that don't open wide enough to climb through. I'm no more inconvenienced than if I didn't have those things, and they do a much better job of keeping someone out of my house than a gun does.

I also never mentioned anything to do with a number pad. That's something you made up.

Pfff. You really don't even need any of that. Empirical evidence has shown that simply the threat of a security system is sufficient at detouring criminals. All I have is an ADT sign in my yard that I stole from a house two blocks over, and I've had no prowlers on my property since.

Security cameras, alarms, and heavy duty locks on doors are cheap and require minimal extra effort on my part. Sure you could just use a visible alarm as a deterrent but the extra costs are so little that I decided to go the whole way with it. Doesn't require any extra effort on my part, and I don't need to worry about the extra risks involved with bringing a gun into the house.
 
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The post I made was in a direct response to someone talking about protecting their family. You're basically just saying that protecting your family is only worth it if it's convenient.

I have extra bolts on our doors that we can use, doesn't make it any more difficult for us to get into the house, since they can only be set when you're already inside. We have visible security cameras and alarms, a gate that can be locked and windows that don't open wide enough to climb through. I'm no more inconvenienced than if I didn't have those things, and they do a much better job of keeping someone out of my house than a gun does.

I also never mentioned anything to do with a number pad. That's something you made up.

Yeah, I used some hyperbole in my post to make for a more entertaining read, we're not having a conference at the UN. Please don't make assumptions about what I would or wouldn't do to protect my family, though. I'm mostly playing devil's advocate for the sake of conversation here, anyway. I don't currently own a firearm, I've lucked into living in a pretty amicable neighborhood and I'm a part of one of three families living here, in an area that's not a residential district. I agree with the post above me, all you *really* need is a loud dog and a super obvious camera above your door, whether it works or not. But I'm not going to condemn people who feel they need a firearm to provide a sense of security to themselves and their home. If you use that firearm in a foolish way, then I'll start judging you, but with this country the way that is, it's going to take more than preventing homeowners from legally purchasing guns to curb violent crimes.
 
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Mista K

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They have no way of knowing if you have a gun or not. If the "threat" of a gun is all you need, then you don't need a gun.

And no I wouldn't want a gun. If I thought there was a chance someone could easily break into my home, I'd take steps to correct that. A gun doesn't make it harder for someone to break into your house. Security systems/cameras, visible alarms, heavy duty locks/bolts on doors, window shields etc. These are all provably effective at stopping someone from entering your home. If you care about protecting your family, getting a gun should be near the bottom of the list of steps you take
Wow, you must be a master at charades. It’s really simple, my state allows guns = people don’t break in. Being a responsible gun owner requires a certain mindset that I don’t think you understand. Not sure where you live, but I get the feeling you haven’t experienced any training courses or even shot before with this bit
I don't need to worry about the extra risks involved with bringing a gun into the house.
 

G Boaty

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Wow, you must be a master at charades. It’s really simple, my state allows guns = people don’t break in. Being a responsible gun owner requires a certain mindset that I don’t think you understand. Not sure where you live, but I get the feeling you haven’t experienced any training courses or even shot before with this bit
What state do you live in where there are no break-ins? I'm sure you'll be able to back that up with a source, or one at the very least shows there are less break-ins than in other states that wouldn't allow a gun for home defence. Because every study that's ever been done has shown that having a gun in the house poses a much bigger risk to you or your family than it does to anyone else. These parents probably thought they were responsible gun owners until they got shot by their two year old. Everyone likes to think they're a responsible gun owner but in plenty of cases they just aren't. You can't seriously be arguing that brining a gun into your house brings no extra risks if you're "responsible".

I grew up with guns, my dad has guns. I've shot guns on plenty of occasions. I will never own a gun.
Yeah, I used some hyperbole in my post to make for a more entertaining read, we're not having a conference at the UN. Please don't make assumptions about what I would or wouldn't do to protect my family, though. I'm mostly playing devil's advocate for the sake of conversation here, anyway. I don't currently own a firearm, I've lucked into living in a pretty amicable neighborhood and I'm a part of one of three families living here, in an area that's not a residential district. I agree with the post above me, all you *really* need is a loud dog and a super obvious camera above your door, whether it works or not. But I'm not going to condemn people who feel they need a firearm to provide a sense of security to themselves and their home. If you use that firearm in a foolish way, them I'll start judging you, but with this country the way that is, it's going to take more than preventing homeowners from legally purchasing guns to curb violent crimes.
I didn't condemn anyone either. This conversation started off with me replying to someone saying "BUY A GUN OP!" asking them how a gun would have helped, because it clearly wasn't needed in this situation.
 
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StormCell

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The post I made was in a direct response to someone talking about protecting their family. You're basically just saying that protecting your family is only worth it if it's convenient.

I have extra bolts on our doors that we can use, doesn't make it any more difficult for us to get into the house, since they can only be set when you're already inside. We have visible security cameras and alarms, a gate that can be locked and windows that don't open wide enough to climb through. I'm no more inconvenienced than if I didn't have those things, and they do a much better job of keeping someone out of my house than a gun does.

I also never mentioned anything to do with a number pad. That's something you made up.



Security cameras, alarms, and heavy duty locks on doors are cheap and require minimal extra effort on my part. Sure you could just use a visible alarm as a deterrent but the extra costs are so little that I decided to go the whole way with it. Doesn't require any extra effort on my part, and I don't need to worry about the extra risks involved with bringing a gun into the house.

I was just being funny. Now most of what you're saying is true that there are probably dozens of smaller things a person can and should do to safeguard their property and family ahead of ever buying a gun. In addition to bolt locks and security cameras, I also believe in having safe areas and/or safe plans for what to do when the unexpected (fire/break in) happens. There just may come a time when you forget the locks and someone (or say 3 big someones) decide they're entering your house and it's a wife or daughter that they are determined to take. It doesn't hurt to have access to places that are significantly more difficult to break into or to have a route out of the house. What matters is for your family to have a plan in the case of the emergency and knowing how to get to safety. It also doesn't hurt to leave certain items across the house to aid in getting to safety.

In that sort of case, I would prefer a system such as ADT who will notify the police on my behalf automatically. Then again, I'm just not crazy about having others monitor me in my home 24/7.
 
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manfestival

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Having a gun doesn't stop all break-ins either. The videos you're talking about are evidence of what I'm saying, which is having a gun doesn't prevent break-ins. Better home security does a much better job of stopping someone from breaking into your house than keeping a gun beside your bed.
"Having a gun doesn't stop all break-ins either." Not what I was arguing at all. Was pointing out what I disagreed with since it didn't make sense considering the overwhelming evidence that points otherwise. The point of having home security is to mitigate the risk as much as possible. There is no implied absolute here. I used to work for ADT. This is stuff I had to deal with on the daily as an installer. You get active protection(a security system to the gills if you want), a dog, and a gun. That is basically the best you can do. People will still try to break in. The gun is just the last line of defense. You gave the intruder every warning possible. Especially if your home has signs all over it.
 

Mista K

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What state do you live in where there are no break-ins? I'm sure you'll be able to back that up with a source, or one at the very least shows there are less break-ins than in other states that wouldn't allow a gun for home defence. Because every study that's ever been done has shown that having a gun in the house poses a much bigger risk to you or your family than it does to anyone else. These parents probably thought they were responsible gun owners until they got shot by their two year old. Everyone likes to think they're a responsible gun owner but in plenty of cases they just aren't. You can't seriously be arguing that brining a gun into your house brings no extra risks if you're "responsible".

I grew up with guns, my dad has guns. I've shot guns on plenty of occasions. I will never own a gun.

I didn't condemn anyone either. This conversation started off with me replying to someone saying "BUY A GUN OP!" asking them how a gun would have helped, because it clearly wasn't needed in this situation.
If a gun was within reach of a two-year old and loaded, that’s not a responsible gun owner whatsoever. Not sure why you would even use that as an example. I could go on and on about statistics, but that won’t change your lived experience or mine. Sure the op didn’t need a gun this time, and thankfully so, but there are plenty of instances where that isn’t the case. So to the op, I’ll leave it at this. Take some training courses and see how you feel, try moving to a better area and be more aware of your own well-being and surroundings. Police are only good after the fact in most cases (if at all), so your health and safety is on you. Take it to heart
 
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G Boaty

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"Having a gun doesn't stop all break-ins either." Not what I was arguing at all. Was pointing out what I disagreed with since it didn't make sense considering the overwhelming evidence that points otherwise. The point of having home security is to mitigate the risk as much as possible. There is no implied absolute here. I used to work for ADT. This is stuff I had to deal with on the daily as an installer. You get active protection(a security system to the gills if you want), a dog, and a gun. That is basically the best you can do. People will still try to break in. The gun is just the last line of defense. You gave the intruder every warning possible. Especially if your home has signs all over it.

People in this thread are not treating a gun as a last line of defence. OP said they left their door unlocked, experienced a break in and escaped completely unharmed, yet people are still suggesting he get a gun. Even though it would have done literally nothing to improve the outcome in this situation.

If a gun was within reach of a two-year old and loaded, that’s not a responsible gun owner whatsoever. Not sure why you would even use that as an example. I could go on and on about statistics, but that won’t change your lived experience or mine. Sure the op didn’t need a gun this time, and thankfully so, but there are plenty of instances where that isn’t the case. So to the op, I’ll leave it at this. Take some training courses and see how you feel, try moving to a better area and be more aware of your own well-being and surroundings. Police are only good after the fact in most cases, so your health and safety is on you. Take it to heart
I didn't say they were responsible, I said they likely would have seen themselves as responsible. Do you honestly think anyone brings a gun into their home and believes/admits that they're not responsible enough to handle it properly?

If you would like to go on about statistics then please do. Every study I can find comes to the conclusion that having a gun in the home creates more risk for the occupants than it does for anyone else. If you have studies that go against that, or studies that show owning a gun decreases your chances of experiencing a break-in then I'd be more than happy to read them.
 

DeepBreath87

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People in this thread are not treating a gun as a last line of defence. OP said they left their door unlocked, experienced a break in and escaped completely unharmed, yet people are still suggesting he get a gun. Even though it would have done literally nothing to improve the outcome in this situation.


I didn't say they were responsible, I said they likely would have seen themselves as responsible. Do you honestly think anyone brings a gun into their home and believes/admits that they're not responsible enough to handle it properly?

If you would like to go on about statistics then please do. Every study I can find comes to the conclusion that having a gun in the home creates more risk for the occupants than it does for anyone else. If you have studies that go against that, or studies that show owning a gun decreases your chances of experiencing a break-in then I'd be more than happy to read them.
The truth is OP probably shouldn’t buy a gun because of he isn’t responsible enough to lock your doors, well… he probably is more likely to shoot himself or a roommate over an intruder.
 
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manfestival

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People in this thread are not treating a gun as a last line of defence. OP said they left their door unlocked, experienced a break in and escaped completely unharmed, yet people are still suggesting he get a gun. Even though it would have done literally nothing to improve the outcome in this situation.
My stance needed to be clear with you since you attempted to strawman my position.
 
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Mista K

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People in this thread are not treating a gun as a last line of defence. OP said they left their door unlocked, experienced a break in and escaped completely unharmed, yet people are still suggesting he get a gun. Even though it would have done literally nothing to improve the outcome in this situation.


I didn't say they were responsible, I said they likely would have seen themselves as responsible. Do you honestly think anyone brings a gun into their home and believes/admits that they're not responsible enough to handle it properly?

If you would like to go on about statistics then please do. Every study I can find comes to the conclusion that having a gun in the home creates more risk for the occupants than it does for anyone else. If you have studies that go against that, or studies that show owning a gun decreases your chances of experiencing a break-in then I'd be more than happy to read them.
That's why I said gun ownership requires a certain mindset. I get not everyone is as strict as I am, which is unfortunate, but that's a separate argument for the rules and laws surrounding this issue. I always advocate training, and clearly in your example they weren't. Perhaps I'll send you links later in a pm, but my work week is starting and this thread is getting overtly political
 

StormCell

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People in this thread are not treating a gun as a last line of defence. OP said they left their door unlocked, experienced a break in and escaped completely unharmed, yet people are still suggesting he get a gun. Even though it would have done literally nothing to improve the outcome in this situation.


I didn't say they were responsible, I said they likely would have seen themselves as responsible. Do you honestly think anyone brings a gun into their home and believes/admits that they're not responsible enough to handle it properly?

If you would like to go on about statistics then please do. Every study I can find comes to the conclusion that having a gun in the home creates more risk for the occupants than it does for anyone else. If you have studies that go against that, or studies that show owning a gun decreases your chances of experiencing a break-in then I'd be more than happy to read them.

I'm pro 2nd amendment, pro owning guns, etc, and all that. This is why I don't currently own any firearms. For the time being it's an unnecessary risk that I'm unwilling to bring into my home. My wife has asked me multiple times to look into buying a firearm for home protection. I bought security cameras instead.

It's not because my spine lacks the fortitude to wield a gun. It certainly does have all the fortitude. It's not just me that I'm concerned about. When I do buy a firearm, I'm also buying a gun safe. If some would-be intruder makes it through all my other deterrents then he can be sorry he met the wrong end of my shot gun provided we couldn't get out of the house. Although, my guess is the 80 lb jet black dog will probably suffice at running him off before he even finds a light switch. Hopefully. Plus, it's totally not according to plan to discharge a firearm inside my house as I hate having to patch walls and crap...
 

StormCell

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But seriously, I've got a wife to think about. She is less likely to successfully handle a firearm. That's my opinion. That's my estimation. I'm better off planning an escape route for her. Certainly leaving firearms within her reach is less desirable if I treasure her continued existence. Firearms aren't for everyone. I've got children also to think about. I can bring them up in the ways of shooting rifles and such, but I wouldn't want them in a situation where they have to choose to end a life. I'd rather just give them a means of self preservation. If someone must choose to end a life in this house, I will make the call and handle the burden.
 
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dr_octagon

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OP, when Mr Patio H Burglar returns in Christmas, leave him out some cookies and milk.

If anyone asks how you know he was an intruder. It is cos he came in-tru-da patio door.
 
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AmuroChan

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Set up a security system in your apartment so that any trespassing would trigger an alarm and automatically contact the police.
 

AmuroChan

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That's how you get yourself and/or your dog killed by the police because of a false alarm.

I've had it set up in my house for over 10 years. Never had any issues. I've had two false alarms during the 10 years. Both times police station called me first to confirm everything is ok.
 
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HotPocket69

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Mom’s basement with my tendies
people call Americans crazy for owning guns, but this right here is the reason. I have a handgun for home defense and don't plan on owning any others. It has a fingerprint reader for quick action as well. Chances are if someone breaks in while I'm in my apartment, I can quickly unlock it before they get to the rooms.

Mine rests on a chair right next to my bed. I can just reach right over and grab it 🙂
 
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Drizzlehell

Neo Member
Dec 24, 2020
35
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This reminded me that every time I move into a new apartment, I always get paranoid that people from the moving company that I hired are gonna come back at night to nick my stuff because they know that I own some valuable stuff. I've had that fear ever since something like that happened to us when I was a kid. Some guy that was moving us came banging on our door at 3 AM in the morning, threatening to bust it open, and only left after my mum called the cops. It was terrifying.
 

ntropy

Member
Apr 25, 2008
3,834
1,178
1,415
But seriously, I've got a wife to think about. She is less likely to successfully handle a firearm. That's my opinion. That's my estimation. I'm better off planning an escape route for her. Certainly leaving firearms within her reach is less desirable if I treasure her continued existence. Firearms aren't for everyone. I've got children also to think about. I can bring them up in the ways of shooting rifles and such, but I wouldn't want them in a situation where they have to choose to end a life. I'd rather just give them a means of self preservation. If someone must choose to end a life in this house, I will make the call and handle the burden.

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