Students, parents file suits over 'sanctity'( the admission scandal) of admissions process; one mom wants $500B

Oct 15, 2007
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Students and their parents are are suing a host of colleges and the alleged mastermind of a nationwide college scandal, alleging they were ripped off of admissions fees and one student saying she had a nervous breakdown when she didn't get into her first-choice universities, according to a suit filed in Santa Clara County Superior Court on Thursday.
A mother in a separate suit filed in San Francisco is asking for no less than $500 billion because her son, who had great grades, wasn't given a "fair chance."

In the South Bay case, the 31-page amended complaint supercedes a suit filed a day earlier by Erica Olsen and Kalea Woods, two Stanford students.
http://www.ktvu.com/news/2-stanford...d-not-maintain-sanctity-of-admissions-process


Five hundred billion! What a joke of an amount to request, though do think there should be some financial penalties for the amount of shadiness.
 
Nov 5, 2016
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This scandal is intriguing. When I first heard about it I didn’t realize how deep the rabbit hole went. Some of the details are borderline hilarious, like in a “how did they get away with that as long as they did” sense. Competely fabricating outlandish sports accomplishments, how lush you paid the proctor dictates how high they doctored the test. Crazy stuff

Gotta be honest, I’m surprised more people aren’t angry. People were angry about David Hogg getting in to an Ivy League school and he’s at least a legit student. I think people suing have a case. Not billion dollar cases, but those who didn’t get it in lieu of these frauds should be peeved
 
Nov 19, 2018
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haha I think this story is hilarious. First the schools and degrees are becoming more meaningless and now the kids that didn't get into their first choice are outraged they didn't get to pay for the privilege of going to these schools.
 
Nov 5, 2016
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$500 billion?

I want what that mom is smoking, because it must be good. Like, how fucked up do you have to be to demand $500 billion on a lawsuit involving a college admissions scandal?
IT's clearly an absolutely ridiculous amount, but I do think they have a case. Someone, or some people, are going to have to pay probably a lot of money for this shit.

haha I think this story is hilarious. First the schools and degrees are becoming more meaningless and now the kids that didn't get into their first choice are outraged they didn't get to pay for the privilege of going to these schools.
For the record, I just want to ask if you fully understand what's happening.

This isn't just "I am suing because my kid got rejected." This is suing because a giant ass scandal is unraveling that is revealing the admissions process to a number of big name schools was compromised. Famous/rich people would set up fake pretenses that the admission committee wouldn't double check, test scores were being proctored, coaches were being paid hundreds of thousands of dollars (in a few cases) to basically say a kid was an athlete who wasn't actually an athlete in order to get them admitted.

It's a pretty huge situation.
 
Nov 19, 2018
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No I think its hilarious I understand it. Both sides are vastly overestimating the opportunities these schools give kids. The higher education accreditation system in this country is largely a joke as we can see from the student debt bubble.

Meanwhile ultra wealthy think it is such a big deal they have to lie and cheat to get into it. And spend even more than an already inflated tuition cost.

Then the ones who don't get in blame all their problems on these liers and cheaters when these liers and cheaters were also administration at the university that they thought was so prestigious.

Then currently in the real world businesses that are hiring for jobs are putting less and less emphasis on these degrees.

Then on top of that the government is involved and they are the ones who have artificially limited the number of accredited schools and been a huge contributor to the rising cost of higher education.
 
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