Summer 2014 Anime |OT2| Or, where Jexhius finally watches more Doremi for Hito.

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MikeHattsu

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Im sort of in the same boat as you, im so new here I don't even know how to properly use 'uguu~~' (is there even a way?).
Better to not use it :p


I'm in the same boat. Anything longer than just an impression or two takes me way too long to organize into something coherent and interesting.

Though in my case even when I do I'd likely be wrong anyway.
Same here as well.
 

_hekk05

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Im sort of in the same boat as you, im so new here I don't even know how to properly use 'uguu~~' (is there even a way?). Im not deep into the industry as I have just scratched the surface and haven't even watched a lot of classics.
Uguu should primarily be used as a way to counter reaction image spamming. Basically, when encountering image spam of a kawaii nature (and most importantly not of an action nature), you quote the image (but please remove the '/' so the image isn't quoted so you don't contribute to the image spam), and respond uguu~~~.

The conversation should now switch from image spamming to how cute the character you quoted is.
 

BGBW

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Sorry, eyes still a bit tired so I'm not taking everything in (also I tend to skim over things when things are looking ugly), but I saw the talk of blogs. Maybe now that tumblr is totally useless for New Leaf I can scrap that blog and make one to archive the one... two... three! Three semi decent reviews I've written.
 

TUSR

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Better to not use it :p
Uguu should primarily be used as a way to counter reaction image spamming. Basically, when encountering image spam of a kawaii nature (and most importantly not of an action nature), you quote the image (but please remove the '/' so the image isn't quoted so you don't contribute to the image spam), and respond uguu~~~.

The conversation should now switch from image spamming to how cute the character you quoted is.
I always assumed it was similar to moe, I went through the K-On thread a few times a couple of months ago and ended up Googling what moe meant. Still to this day im unsure what exactly it means.



Ranma 1/2 Remastered Blurays 1-3

Absolutely worth every penny, I managed to watch a few episodes before I dozed off. Ranma OP1 is easily the most memorable of the intros from the whole series.

Does anyone know when the rest of these are coming out?
 

Hitokage

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I always assumed it was similar to moe, I went through the K-On thread a few times a couple of months ago and ended up Googling what moe meant. Still to this day im unsure what exactly it means.
"Uguu" is just an infantile vocalization used by a character in the show Kanon. It's been mocked as a prototypical example of what's bad about anime.

As for moe, it has no meaning that's been nailed down, but it's largely to do with the reaction invoked by characters that are weak or incompetent to the point of cuteness and needing protection.
 

_hekk05

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I always assumed it was similar to moe, I went through the K-On thread a few times a couple of months ago and ended up Googling what moe meant. Still to this day im unsure what exactly it means.
Moe is used on cute girls being cute

Uguu is used on cute girls being cute and wanting to be told they're cute

When said by a cute girl, uguu~ is basically a permutation of Hau~. Hau~ is used when a girl is lovingly smacked as part of a tsukkomi, whereas uguu~ is used when things does not go a girl's way
 

Rhapsody

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I always assumed it was similar to moe, I went through the K-On thread a few times a couple of months ago and ended up Googling what moe meant. Still to this day im unsure what exactly it means.
Not knowing what it is means that you're not high level in anime/manga like hekk is here.
 

Mature

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Urusei Yatsura - 51

Domestic turmoil makes for great comedy.

So I discovered this episode is the origin of the cel I bought. Pretty happy about it too since it's a really fun episode. Ataru's persistence in trying to get past the big cat guarding his kotatsu made for some great slapstick. It seemed for awhile that Mr. and Mrs. Moroboshi weren't getting as much time in the spotlight, but that's been rectified in recent episodes. They're pretty unique characters who offer a needed— sometimes straight-faced— dichotomy to the boke antics of the rest of the household.
 

PshycoNinja

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"Uguu" is just an infantile vocalization used by a character in the show Kanon. It's been mocked as a prototypical example of what's bad about anime.

As for moe, it has no meaning that's been nailed down, but it's largely to do with the reaction invoked by characters that are weak or incompetent to the point of cuteness and needing protection.
This is what KEY anime gets us.
 

TUSR

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I hate to quote my own post, but...

Last thread someone posted a magical girl GIF (might have been from that PreCure show?) and she was dancing around with a scepter of some sort and there were explosions everywhere.

1. Does anyone have the GIF still?
2. If anyone knows what im talking about, could you tell me the shows name?

If it helps I think the girl had yellow hair. Im sifting through the last thread and hopefully someone can answer me before I scan 400 pages.
Im still looking for this GIF, im pretty sure it is from Happiness Charge but I can't seem to find it. I've searched over 100 pages in the last thread and no results :S

Edit: I give up.
 

fertygo

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I'd write more long, intellectually-inclined posts if it didn't take upwards of two hours to compose them.

That's actually not a joke sadly.
LOL I thought I had it bad, I only type with one hand and never master 5-finger typing either.. so making long post can painfully long for me.
 

CorvoSol

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As bad as those sounds are, I assumed that Higarashi's Hanyuu made them because she appeared to be part animal. Of course, I also assumed that the point of Higarashi was disguising it's twisted story of tortured souls behind the saccharine veneer of a cutesy anime.
 

Thoraxes

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I'd write more long, intellectually-inclined posts if it didn't take upwards of two hours to compose them.

That's actually not a joke sadly.
I look at it in terms of value.

Two hours writing a post that's well thought out and 4 people will read all of and appreciate...

Or 2 hours watching 5-6 episodes of LOGH.

I think I know the right choice here.
 

Thoraxes

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Aruarian Dance is still one of the favorites. So sublime.
Speaking of Champloo: No joke, i've been listening to Just Forget on loop while at work for the past 3 days. Literally just 8 hours of this song every day and for some reason I just love it. I do this with anything that has a certain attractive quality I love in music though, and i'm a big fan of ostinato.
Edit:
Speaking of Penguin, was Penguindrum any good?
I love Ikuhara, so I completely ate that show up so fucking hard.

Also I still have this image that Regulus posted when it was airing.

 

Envelope

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Penguindrum is bad watch something good instead

i actually want to revisit penguindrum sometime since it wasn't all bad, it more collapsed under itself
 

Deputy Dangle

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Sketchbook: Full Colors – 8-13 END
Sketchbook: Full Colors suffers from an identity crisis. One half wants to indulge in Sora’s quiet observations of the environment and her fellow classmates in a serene, Aria-like fashion. The other wants to be a wacky comedy with a sizeable cast and numerous 4koma-esque scenarios. The problem with these two elements is that they are very disparate in Sketchbook. They are so dissimilar from each other in execution that the show goes out of its way to separate Sora and the rest of the cast, as if one can only work when the other is hardly involved or even there.

The last episode in particular made this even more apparent to me during two scenes involving members of the class observing a slowly blooming cherry blossom tree. The first scene starts and ends with comedy in mind: After the class finishes an outdoor lunch, the art teacher- in a “drunk” juice-filled daze -begins ranting about a certain tree that hasn’t fully bloomed like the others yet. She thinks it hasn’t realized that it’s Spring yet, so she comes up with a few outlandish ideas to remind it. The ideas become increasingly silly, like hugging it to give it warmth, and later getting one of the students, Negishi, to stand on top of it in order to loudly yell a chant. During these events, there are sparse cuts to Sora’s reactions. She is enamored by her teacher’s enthusiasm, but her presence there is hardly felt and is subsequently drowned out by the yelling as usual.

Following a hard cut after the tree chant gag, Sora decides to stay for a little longer when the rest of the class heads home in the second scene. She continues to look onward at the trees and directly states that the atmosphere has changed when she’s alone amidst a calm, sunset backdrop behind said trees. Then Negishi’s younger sister shows up for a brief moment to pass on some photos of a group picture they took during a similar time of day in a prior episode. This leads to Sora warmly reflecting on the passing of time and shared memories between her classmates and the cherry blossoms.

Sketchbook tends to flip flop between these two tones multiple times in an episode. Sometimes it changes things up like having Sora go off and do her own thing entirely or switching the focus from the art classmates to a group of talkative cats, but that basic structure remains true throughout. It never really tries to blend the quietly introspective side with the loud, comedic side as organically as it could. If anything, it tries quite hard to distance the two as much as possible.

But with that being said, I dig the small town mono no aware side with Sora quite a bit, and I’ve been vocal about it in the past. It makes me want to check out Tamayura more than anything. But the same can’t be said for the comedy, which is what made me go back and forth with my thoughts on the show as a whole. The comedy may very well just not be for me, but I do still think there is an underlying problem with the handling of it that undercuts the other half. Unfortunately, it resulted in a less emotionally resonant finale. More focus and less trying to do too many things would have done this show a world of good.
 

Hitokage

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Black Jack 1

About halfway through the second part of this double-length episode I remembered that Osamu Tezuka actually got a medical degree before deciding to devote his career to manga. This series is evidently his outlet for a practice he never actually took up, but could live out in story form. So far so good in that respect. He's not exactly an anime House MD here, but being voiced by Batou's VA (Akio Ohtsuka) helps a lot.

I'm not sure why they couldn't just get a strong magnet, though.

Ok, as for the little girl named Pinoko, I have three things to say:

First, whatever you might find in anime or manga as a whole, it can usually be said that Tezuka did it first. Accordingly, when you see these scenes...




...it's difficult to not see it as yet another example of anime being doomed from the start.

Second, as to her voice, it's just this woman:



Total non-issue.

Third....

wikipedia said:
Pinoko (ピノコ) is Black Jack's loyal assistant/surrogate daughter. She spent 18 years as a parasitic twin, using psychokinetic powers to fend off the doctors trying to remove her. After convincing her that she wouldn't be pitched out with the Medical Waste, Black Jack built a synthetic body to house her organs. The first thing she did once in her new body was violently call her twin sister out for trying to have her killed. This freaked out the sister, who disappeared and left Pinoko with Black Jack. [...] However, this exoskeleton limits some of her abilities, most notably halting her physical growth and not being able to swim for long durations. She speaks with a strong lisp which may be due to her exoskeletal skull. ...
Holy shit is that metal.
 

Gazoinks

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Can't wait to flood the thread with my essay posts on the Black Rose Arc of Utena.

Only reason for the delay is because I'm still not entirely sure what the fuck just happened.
Don't worry, none of us are quite sure what happened. Looking forward to that post, reading Utena interpretations is always a lot of fun.
 

Hitokage

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Can't wait to flood the thread with my essay posts on the Black Rose Arc of Utena.

Only reason for the delay is because I'm still not entirely sure what the fuck just happened.
The only recourse is to continue on, and then maybe rewatch the whole show to see things with perspective.
 

Deputy Dangle

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I tend to look back fondly on sketchbook myself, a lot of it probably has to do with the OST which is probably one of my favorites in anime history. Its just so peaceful and soft and great to chill out to.
I liked the OST as well. It complimented a lot of Sora's scenes nicely.

And I completely forgot to mention in both Sketchbook impressions posts that I looove the OP song.
 

Thoraxes

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Can't wait to flood the thread with my essay posts on the Black Rose Arc of Utena.

Only reason for the delay is because I'm still not entirely sure what the fuck just happened.
A second watch (when done with the series) is pretty much a must with Utena. The amount of stuff you discover that second time is just amazing.
 

CorvoSol

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The Big O, Episode 26

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS POST CONTAINS OPEN SPOILERS FOR THE BIG O.

Everything was Tomatoes. The End.
I saw The Big O for the first time over a year ago, and I was immediately captivated by it. How could one not be? The show is a classy mashup of Batman, film noire, Asimovian Science Fiction and mecha anime that meshes in a marvelous, unexpected way. The hero, Roger Smith, is dashing and debonair, the heroines, Dorothy and Angel, are wonderful foils, and the villains Schwarzwald and Alex Rosewater are as captivating as they are threatening.

The set up and follow through of the first season was sublime. Following that same Batman premise, Roger used his mech to fight monsters and solve crimes, all while looking great in his suit. The second season, however, left me in quite a bit of confusion. There were extended metaphors, the first episode began with an Evangelion-esque introspection by the protagonist, and the series' finale raised more questions than it could answer, its visuals at first offering me no end of frustration and agitation.

I believe, putting it simply, that all these tomatoes got to my head.

However, time moved on and those seeds remained planted as I went to watch other shows and have other experiences. I don't know how many of you are gardeners, but it happens to be one of the few things that really gives me pleasure, that truly satisfies me during my listless summer days. And yes, that means I tend to separate a section of my garden for the sake of a tomato crop. The funny thing about tomatoes is that they're an extremely virulent plant, or perhaps they simply get along quite well with the climate here in the Pacific Northwest. In the process of tending my garden, I've learned that tomato seeds can and do endure the intense heat that composting produces. When that compost is then mixed back into the soil, the tomato seeds can and do take root and grow up without any special attention. And so the questions The Big O left behind, fittingly like tomato seeds, survived my own negligence toward them over this span of time.

This last semester I had the opportunity to take a class on foreign literature, during which we saw Fritz Lang's expressionist film Metropolis during a unit on symbolism. And I warrant that this experience was of the utmost experience because The Big O is a series rich in symbolism and because The Big O draws heavy influence from Metropolis for these symbols. There are a number of shared symbols and concepts immediately apparent, for instance the presence of a robot woman of critical importance to the plot, the separation of those who have and those who have not, Allan Gabriel's robotic hand, and most important of all, the design of The Bigs, specifically O and Venus.

The first image presented is the android Maria, from Metropolis and the second is the face of Big Venus, from The Big O. Note the similar crest to the head, as well as the prominence of the nose, mouth and eyes but replacement of ears with the mechanical. I'll go into the importance of this a little later, but I trust that these points are enough to illustrate the connection I'm talking about for the time being.

It isn't my intent to go through every single symbol in the show. Some of them are plain as day, like the horizontal hourglass mounted on a cross inside Big Fau, but I do want to take the time to see if I can't paint a lucid picture of what is going on in the end of the second season. To do so, I'm mostly just going to do my best to tie together my understanding of the concepts that were so heavily featured therein.

1. The Tomatoes. This one's actually fairly simple, I think, considering the amount of time spent on it in the second season. The Tomatoes are a metaphor used by Gordon Rosewater to explain his experiment. This experiment was conducted after the Calamity in an attempt to graft Memories into children. The children in the experiment were Tomatoes. Note that most of these children were in their early twenties at the time of the first season, when Alex Rosewater had the R-D assassinate them for speaking out about their memories. These children are the second batch of tomatoes. I'll get to the first, later. Presumably, when the experiment was a success, the children were disbursed into the city until the memories were cultivated. The metaphor explains the main idea behind it all: in Paradigm City, tomatoes are a crop which had to be grown "synthetically." The natural stock had been lost during The Calamity, and so these new, synthetic tomatoes were not as good as actual tomatoes are. However, by continuing to farm them again and again, the tomatoes might one day regain their old flavor. Thus, by planting the memory fragments into children, they might one day grow into full fledged Memories again.

2. The Memories. So what, exactly, are Memories? I confess the show is never quite clear on it, so I think it would be most profitable to think of them as that self-same power source upon which all heroes in mecha operate. Whether it's the Light of your Soul, or Getter Rays, or Spiral Energy or just plain old Shonen Heart, it is clear that Memories are what make the world of Big O go round. As an added link in this concept, consider that the finale of the series places a great amount of focus on the fact that Memories are best found in human form. Just as the Spiral Energy is at its peak in human shape, Memories are clearest when inside humans, and yet, as Gordon points out, they are fragile things which are subject to human fraudulence and indulgence. The actual point is to make a point about what our memories mean to us, and what it means to be shackled to or break free from our pasts, but within the work itself it is best to consider that they are both your actual memories and a source of power and information. In Metropolis, it is Maria's memories which allow her android to so fully take her place, and it is the memory of Hel, the protagonist's mother, which fuels the ambitions of the principal villains.

3. The Union. The concept of foreign survivors and powers is introduced late into the first season of The Big O. There's a lot of debate over who and what they are over the course of the series, but it ultimately boils down to this: The Union is the first batch of tomatoes. Based on what Vera and Gordon talk about, these are the children who were rejected by Gordon and cast out, even beyond the domes and into the wastelands, to perish and die. Gordon implies to Vera that they may not exist at all, but his sanity is in question at that point, and it's hard to argue with the hand the Union has played in the series. It's clear that Alex makes a deal with them to get the parts necessary to make Big Fau, and equally clear that he breaks that deal, leading to Vera's arrival in the city. The finale itself takes place during the Union's assault upon Paradigm as retribution for Alex's betrayal, and Alex's own use of that assault to begin his reconstruction of the world in his image.

4. Alex Rosewater. It's unclear to me if Alex Rosewater actually was Gordon Rosewater's biological son or not. He is presented as being considerably older than the rest of the second batch of the tomatoes, and possibly older than the first batch. What is clear is that Alex was a resounding success. Alex's memories enabled him to pilot Big Fau, rendering him a Dominus, which is the show's term both for pilot and ruler. Note that all of the Domini have the power to exert great influence over the people of Paradigm. Schwarzwald's words stir up their hearts, Roger's actions the same, and Alex's sheer might cows them into obedience. Angel's power as one grants her the power to destroy the city and world itself. Alex betrays the Union not simply out of political spite, but because they are also children of Rosewater, the same as him and the rest of the tomatoes, and he cannot tolerate anyone other than himself being Gordon's child.

5. Roger and Angel. Last of all comes Roger and Angel. Gordon specifically says that the two of them are not tomatoes. He claims that Angel is a memory, and says he has a contract with Roger. What contract? To speak to the director of the world's stage and negotiate with them for the sake of mankind. Or rather, to talk to God and negotiate with Him for mankind's survival. What follows is largely speculation, but here is what I think that really means.

I. Gordon Rosewater lied, and the contents of his book, Metropolis, are the truth. The Calamity of Forty Years Ago really was a war of giant robots. During that great conflict, the Big Series of Megadeuses produced its fourth and most powerful archetype: Big Venus. We see in flashbacks frequent shots of the Big Three during this calamity, but scenes of Big Venus are shown only briefly during the final episode, wherein Big Venus is seen attacking Paradigm City. Gordon Rosewater's contract, then, was to ask Roger to beg Big Venus to spare the city. According to Roger's speech at the end of the series, it is likely that he, Roger, then wiped all of his own memories and in so doing all other memories in the world of the series. The assault was forestalled, Paradigm City was transformed into a gigantic stage, and the remainder of the world ruined. The final destruction was stalled and memories erased in the hopes that, free from them, mankind could avert its destruction and Roger could stop Angel.

II. The phrase "a bird which has lost its feathers will go back to the beast which it was before becoming a bird" is uttered several times in connection to Angel and Big Venus. From this, I suppose that, if Roger failed, Angel would return to being Big Venus and resume her destruction of the city. Much of the second season demonstrates a widening gulf between the two, and indeed a world which rejects Angel altogether. This isn't the only hint at Angel's true nature, either. When, in the episode about an angel coming to Paradigm city, Roger sees the debris, it appears to be part of one of the overhanging lamplights. As further evidence, Angel is dressed up as a director of a television show who is watching the events from a distance, making her The Director of the Stage which Gordon Rosewater had spoken of.

III. Upon Big Venus' revival, Roger takes up his contract one last time, now free of memories, and convinces Angel not to destroy the city. The ending scene shows Angel and Dorothy living in Paradigm City after that destruction. Roger still refers to it as the City of Amnesia, and from the wreckage we can tell that the city was either restored to the state it was in after Roger's battle with Alex or prior to the Calamity. Ultimately, everything within Paradigm City was created or influenced by the presence of Angel and Roger as part of Roger's contract with Gordon to dissuade Angel from destroying the City.

Roger's own identity is a source of great confusion, because at one point the finale seems to imply that Roger himself is an android, with a sequence of machines building numerous Roger Androids, but I believe that the true significance of this sequence is to pay homage to Metropolis in which an android woman takes the place of her human counterpart, and suggest that Roger himself is at that moment fearing the loss of his own identity. The conflict of Maria and her mechanical self is one we can see in the conflict between Angel and Dorothy as well. The clash of living and machine is raised repeatedly in both works.

The film, Metropolis, ends with Freder, the son of the powerful businessman Joh Fredersen, mediating between his father and the working class, in an ending that can either be uplifting or bleak depending upon your interpretation. One of the key themes of Metropolis is "The Mediator between the Head and Hands Must be the Heart!" Is it any surprise, then, that the main character of The Big O is Roger The Negotiator? The Negotiation in the series may be similarly characterized as being between The Head (Angel, who is the Director, God, and The Memories) and The Hands (The People of Paradigm City, Gordon Rosewater, his farm and his crops). I would argue that, unlike Metropolis, however, the ending to The Big O is intended as something more clearly positive. I warn that I misunderstood the ending of Metropolis as such, too, but in this case I think the clarity is derived from the evident catharsis of Angel, freed from her own stresses, and from Roger's speech about how Memories, for all that they prove who and what we are, also bind us to the past and how we are better off without them if those bindings prove restrictive rather than enabling.

I could probably go on at length about other ways in which Metropolis figures into the ending of Big O, but I think I'd like to mull over that topic awhile longer before really addressing it in a bigger way. Maybe I'll even check out Osamu Tezuka's own take on the work in 1949 or the 2001 anime adaptation loosely based thereon first.

There is one final thing I'd like to cover before finishing up.

6. Why Did It Get So Crazy In the Second Season?

Rather than just tell you it's because Chiaki J. Konaka had lost his marbles for an ancient, incredibly influential German silent film, I think you deserve to know at least that The Big O was originally a show with very bad viewership in Japan, cutting its run from 26 episodes down to a mere 13. The show was saved, however, due to its immense popularity in the West, garnered because of its running on Toonami. The Second Season was co-produced by Cartoon Network, and so the addition of their influences, input, and aid no doubt had a factor on numerous things. You'll notice right away a difference in a few voice actors and overall animation between the two seasons. I don't think that Cartoon Network's influence invalidates it, or meddles with it in a significant way, only that I think that the effort required to achieve that second season, and the requirements that came with it undoubtedly played some role in the very nature of the season.

Ultimately, The Big O remains one of the absolute masterpieces of the Mecha genre, and this second viewing has done no more than increase my love of and appreciation for it. As I said before, I could go on and on about the worth of this work, but, as I believe I have long overstayed the brevity requisite for the soul of wit, I can only hope that this post helps to explain to others what the heck went down in that final season of the show.
 

Hitokage

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May 30, 2004
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No it's an episodic series through and through.
It's pretty much like The Simpsons in its structure. Continuity is preserved sometimes and the occasional development happens, but for the most part characters are who they are.
 

fertygo

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Damn great writeup Corvo, can't wait to rewatch the show later.. still think S1 is a lot better though especially for its production value the transition to digital composition screwing up some thing in the S2.
 

Hitokage

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Black Jack 2

I really hope they address the doctor's American attitude towards medical care at some point. They almost did in this episode, but it was left hanging.
 

phoenix296

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Elfen Lied Final

EP1 | EP2 | EP3 | EP4 | EP5 | EP6 | EP7 | EP8 | EP9 | EP10 | EP11 | EP12 | EP13

Where to begin... I already did a rant on how awful this anime was for my episode four impressions but I suppose I should wrap things up with my final impressions.

Elfen Lied translates from German to Elven Song. Elves are seen in old Germany as evil and deceptive creatures that take advantage of humans. In some Scandinavian lore elves whisper to children as the murder them. They were creatures to be feared and were nothing like the modern day interpretations such as Legolas. However, the mutant creatures found in this anime are nothing like the elves of German lore so this title makes absolutely no sense.


...am the batman.
Kouta is our lead protagonist in this story. He is the hero this anime deserves but not the one it needs. He is our watchful protector, a dark knight. He is first introduced as the thoughtful guy who takes naked pink haired girls with cat ears who can only make one noise home to look after them. Not long after that, he is accepting girls into his home left and right. He sees this as a way to make up for his dark past... where is sister and father are brutally murdered
by the same pink haired girl he takes in.
Not only has he completely forgotten who murdered them but he then falls in love with the one who murdered them after remembering who had killed them. This moron is crazy and his personality is as likeable as a wet paper bag. He is so drab and dull and most of his dialogue consists of yelling out pink haired girl's ridiculous name. He has to be the worst protag in any anime I have seen so far.

Yuka is Kouta's cousin who been in love with him since childhood (wtf?!). When they both first been pink haired girl she is not only eager to help her but encourages Kouta to take her home with them. Afterwards any time pink haired girl shows any form of attraction or desire towards Kouta she becomes extremely jealous and takes it out on him physical or emotionally. Not content with being jealous over one girl, she is the one who pushes Kouta to continue to take more into his home. Her character infuriated me as she continued to do the "take them home then get mad" bit throughout the whole series. Other than the over the top jealousy she is complete fool who will do anything for dull protag and declare absolutely hideous lines like the one above. If she had been killed instead of Kouta's sister this anime would be better for it.

Pink haired girl is the last "main" protagonist of the series. She is introduced as an absolute killing machine with no emotion and murders without discretion. As soon as she leaves her prison, she is reduced to snivelling idiot who can only make one noise. She is completely incapable of doing anything herself and depends on protag to get changed, feed herself and bath herself. However, when she takes a small bump on the head she suddenly reverts back to her killer self. The process of this split personality made absolutely no sense. The Nyu character was not endearing with her pink hair and her "cute" noises but painful and infuriating to watch.

The dialogue and writing in this anime is atrocious. We get hilarious dialogue as seen above several times through out the anime. The situations and events to explain pink haired girl's tragic past were so over the top that it was completely unbelievable and embarrassing. You can tell the writers are trying to be taken seriously with their grim dark, tragic heroine's back story but we get children who beat puppies to death, adults who knock kids over in a crowded festival then proceed to yell at them afterwards and inner monologues that make absolutely no sense. They tried to accomplish an edgy, depressing story but fail utterly in almost every aspect.

This anime is extremely graphic in both violence and nudity. In both the OP and ED there is full frontal female nudity for almost the whole 1:30 of it. In almost every episode, one of the many female characters displays their chest for all to see. Not only is it the older mature girls who get treated this way, but the younger child characters as well. All I could do was shake my head in disgust as to what I was watching. The violence was complete and utter nonsense. We have decapitations, implosions, eye ball gouging, castration, breaking bones, animal beating and pools and pools of blood. This has to be the goriest anime I have seen and none of it was entertaining in the least. It was over the top violence for violence's sake.

I think I have seen enough anime now to say that the animation in this was pretty bad. Character's mouths failed to move during some scenes where they are singing, movement was jerky and the overall aesthetic was displeasing to the eye. The pink haired mutant girls were hideous to look at and the design choice to have ruthless killers be moe has to be some sick joke. The sound design was serviceable. The voice acting was meh and the soundtrack was decent.

I give this anime a 2/10 only for the soundtrack. While watching this I found nothing redeemable about any of it. After every episode I thought to myself, "Do I really want to watch more of this shit?" and it was a slog to get through. Never have I watched an anime where I actively thought while watching that I just want it to stop.

Taken from EP4 impressions
TLDR: This anime is bloody awful. If you have any intention of watching this look at yourself in the mirror then slap yourself on the face.

 

jgminto

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Jul 21, 2010
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Y'know I didn't say it the first time but it doesn't seem cool to have a pic of a girl with her limbs severed embedded in a post. It's pretty disturbing even if it isn't extremely gory. I'm not a fan of boobage, but if that can't be posted this probably shouldn't be either.
 
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