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Syrian Civil War |OT|

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Assad is a dick.
But, rather the devil you know...

A perspective which many is beginning to agree with as the revolution progresses.

An interesting analysis from Stratfor also touches upon this subject (quite old though, but still interesting!):

http://www.stratfor.com/weekly/20110504-making-sense-syrian-crisis

It is not a coincidence that Israel, with which Syria shares a strong and mutual antipathy, has been largely silent over the Syrian unrest. Already unnerved by what may be in store for Egypt's political future, Israel has a deep fear of the unknown regarding the Syrians. How, for example, would a conservative Sunni government in Damascus conduct its foreign policy? The real virtue of the Syrian regime lies in its predictability: The al Assad government, highly conscious of its military inferiority to Israel, is far more interested in maintaining its hegemony in Lebanon than in picking fights with Israel. While the al Assad government is a significant patron to Hezbollah, Hamas and Palestinian Islamic Jihad, among other groups it manages within its Islamist militant supply chain, its support for such groups is also to some extent negotiable, as illustrated most recently by the fruits of Turkey's negotiations with Damascus in containing Palestinian militant activity and in Syria's ongoing, albeit strained, negotiations with Saudi Arabia over keeping Hezbollah in check. Israel's view of Syria is a classic example of the benefits of dealing with the devil you do know rather than the devil you don't.

Read more: Making Sense of the Syrian Crisis | Stratfor
Follow us: @stratfor on Twitter | Stratfor on Facebook
 

liger05

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Ooops the FSA military council denies claims of infighting with Jabhat Al Nusra & ISIS. The council also refers to JN & ISIS as FSA’s brothers.

Reuters and other media outlets will be very disappointed. These stories of infighting is nothing but SMC propaganda designed to secure western arms.
 

phosphor112

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Who is asking for weapons from the west? If you mean idris and the FSA people already stopped believing his shit ages ago. The other groups are getting weapons just fine and are not asking the west for anything.

Dude your getting emotional. SAA lol. If they actually were a force there would be no need for hezbollah, Iranian soldiers or Shia's from Iraq to back them up. Homs is still not taken as well Alhamdulillah.

By that logic, if the FSA were a force, then they wouldn't need JN, ISIS and AQ to invade Syria and attack with them.

And just a heads up, Syrian "rebels" were invading Iraq long before those soldiers stepped up. I'm sure you wouldn't know though.
 
Oct 24, 2012
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By that logic, if the FSA were a force, then they wouldn't need JN, ISIS and AQ to invade Syria and attack with them.

And just a heads up, Syrian "rebels" were invading Iraq long before those soldiers stepped up. I'm sure you wouldn't know though.

FSA is all Syrian native rebels. What you're talking about is JN & ISIS and others possibly. Stop painting them all with the same brush and give the impression that all the rebels are foreigners which is trademark regime propaganda and an absolute lie.
 

phosphor112

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FSA is all Syrian native rebels. What you're talking about is JN & ISIS and others possibly. Stop painting them all with the same brush and give the impression that all the rebels are foreigners which is trademark regime propaganda and an absolute lie.

I don't think you read my statement correctly. I wasn't putting the FSA in the same group as the outsiders.

I used an equivalent example to him.

SAA is a force, that has OUTSIDE forces helping them. Hezbollah, Iran, etc.
FSA is a force, that has OUTSIDE forces helping them. JN, ISIS, AQ, etc.

He's dismissing the fact that SAA is a force because they have outside forces helping them.
With his logic, you can dismiss the FSA as a force that same way.
 

liger05

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By that logic, if the FSA were a force, then they wouldn't need JN, ISIS and AQ to invade Syria and attack with them.

And just a heads up, Syrian "rebels" were invading Iraq long before those soldiers stepped up. I'm sure you wouldn't know though.

That's the point. The FSA can't win this alone. The most efficient organised brigades are the 'islamists'. Forget ISIS or JN without Ahrar al-Sham there would be no uprising.

JN and ISIS have invaded Syria? How exactly have you come to that conclusion. Those groups consist of majority natives with also members from outside Syria but invasion. Please.

A lot of fighting today between the PKK and Jabhat Al Nusra.
 
Oct 24, 2012
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I don't think you read my statement correctly. I wasn't putting the FSA in the same group as the outsiders.

I used an equivalent example to him.

SAA is a force, that has OUTSIDE forces helping them. Hezbollah, Iran, etc.
FSA is a force, that has OUTSIDE forces helping them. JN, ISIS, AQ, etc.

He's dismissing the fact that SAA is a force because they have outside forces helping them.
With his logic, you can dismiss the FSA as a force that same way.

Ahh okay! Now I understand!

ISIS has people from Iraq (as part of the name....) and has declared the JN as it's branch. Now, since JN is a heavily associated with AQ themselves, there is a very real issue of "outsiders" entering Syria as AQ has a very large reach in the middle east. Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Egypt, SA.

http://in.reuters.com/article/2013/07/14/pakistan-syria-taliban-idINDEE96D02Z20130714

I've read different analysis on this call from TTP and some are even saying that this is a propaganda stunt by the TTP as they don't have the capabilities to take on such big projects. Instead this may be an act of trying to extract maximum PR from very minimal presence in Syria.

STRATFOR

July 15, 2013 | 1519 GMT
Summary


(BULENT KILIC/AFP/GettyImages)

Jihadists train near Aleppo, Syria, on July 19.

A claim by the Pakistani Taliban that they have sent members to Syria to participate in the jihadist insurgency there is unsurprising and unsubstantial. The distances involved and the weakened state of the Pakistani militant group mean it would be hard-pressed to mount much more than a public relations campaign in Syria.

Analysis

A Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan official told the BBC on July 12 that his group has established a facility in Syria housed by Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan advisers and observers helping foreign fighters in electronic and other warfare techniques. Mohammad Amin, the coordinator of the base, said the initiative was launched some six months ago in coordination with the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan's jihadist allies in Syria. He added that roughly a dozen experts from the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan have been dispatched over the past two months, and that the Taliban forces hope to learn from the experiences of the Syrian jihadists.

That a handful of Pakistani militants would make their way to Syria comes as no surprise. Syria is the main theatre of jihadism at present. As in other similarly situated countries before, it is bound to attract seasoned militants and novices able to reach the country via a network that includes state actors such as Saudi Arabia. Such state actors are working to strengthen the Syrian rebellion to promote their geopolitical interests by rolling back Shiite and Iranian influence. The sectarian nature of the Syrian conflict is a strong enticement for militants from Pakistan. Anti-Shiite groups in Pakistan have targeted the minority sect since the 1980s, before embracing al Qaeda's transnational jihadism in the 1990s.

Despite their motivation, it is unlikely groups like the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan can operate effectively at such great distances from their home base. At best, the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan can hope to facilitate Syrian rebel groups' operations, as it helped Afghan groups mount the suicide bombing that killed seven CIA operatives at a U.S. military base in eastern Afghanistan in 2010. The attack on the CIA personnel further emboldened the group toward transnational causes. In that case, however, geographic proximity to the target site, assistance from rogue elements within the Pakistani security establishment and the alliance with al Qaeda contributed greatly to the attack -- elements that are missing in Syria. And since 2010, the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan's capabilities have greatly declined due to Islamabad's launch of a major offensive against the group's strongholds in Swat and tribal areas in 2009.

Therefore, the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan most likely does not have the ability to play a significant role in a venue as distant as Syria. Transporting operatives and then maintaining communications with them is not an easy task. Al Qaeda and its allies, especially those in Pakistan, are very much on the radars of the intelligence services of the United States, Jordan, Iran and Turkey. All of these countries share an interest in ensuring the conflict in Syria does not lead to jihadism spilling across the region, even though they may fall on different sides of the struggle.

Even al Qaeda prime, which remains headquartered in Pakistan, is unable to play a major role in the Syrian conflict, despite all of its connections. Al Qaeda prime's leadership appears stuck in Pakistan and thus unable to control the Iraqi and Syrian jihadists, which explains its decision to maintain Syria and Iraq as two distinct jihadist theaters under separate command structures. It apparently has since sought personnel from the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan to give it a window into the developments in Syria, where the jihadist landscape is becoming extremely complex. Different transnational jihadists appear to be at odds with one another in Syria, to say nothing of nationalist jihadist types, Salafists and other Islamist militant elements.

If the Iraqi node of al Qaeda, which actually can project power into Syria, is having problems with the main Syrian jihadist group, Jabhat al-Nusra, then it would be extremely unlikely that a group that is not even Arab could run operations of any worth at such a long distance. In the light of these factors, the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan's statement about its Syrian operations suggests the Pakistani jihadist movement is trying to extract maximum public relations benefits from a minimal presence in Syria.

I'm not even sure we're allowed to copy/paste whole articles anymore, not sure though, are we ?


Who did?

Also, last month or so, another important grave was destroyed as well. I'm guessing it was wahabis/salafis both times, as they consider these type of graves as blasphemous...

EDIT: I need to stop double posting...

T'was no Salafists/Wahabis. The bombs of Assad has destroyed the grave and mosque of one of the greatest islamic heroes of all time.





A shame and a disgrace to all muslims to let this happen.
 

phosphor112

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I'm thinking of another one.

EDIT: Here

Hujr ibn Adi
I honestly don't even know who the guy was until I googled it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hujr_ibn_Adi#Desecration_of_Shrine

Ahh okay! Yeah there is alot of pictures floating around on the net of the destruction too.

A lot of rival mosques/shrines is getting destroyed in this conflict which turns more secterian by each day.


EDIT: I thought you were talking about the Khalid Ibn al-Walid Mosque.
 

liger05

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Article on Ahrar al-Sham and the strength of the group.

http://www.economist.com/news/middl...s-have-overtaken-all-others-competition-among

UNTIL last month the leader of Ahrar al-Sham (the Free Men of Syria), a large Salafist rebel group, went by a nom de guerre. Then on June 8th Hassan Aboud revealed his real name in an interview with Al Jazeera, the Qatari satellite television channel. Days later he attended a Salafist shindig in Cairo. Slowly but surely his group, which may number 10,000-20,000 fighters and leads the Syrian Islamic Front, a coalition of like-minded rebel groups, has become the most powerful outfit battling against President Bashar Assad.

Ahrar al-Sham’s success is partly due to its fighters’ discipline and ability, qualities that have enabled Syria’s Islamist rebels to outgrow the fractious secular ones. Since late 2011, when the group first emerged in Idleb, a north-western province, it has made a big impact on the battlefield. It was one of the first groups to use improvised explosive devices and to target the regime’s military bases in order to capture weapons. Soon other groups were clamouring to join it. By January this year Ahrar al-Sham had 83 units spanning the whole country, including Damascus and Aleppo, its second city. In March it led the attack on the north-eastern town of Raqqa, the largest one now under rebel control.

Politically Ahrar al-Sham has been clever. It sees the war in Syria as a battle between Sunnis and Shias and wants a Sunni-led Islamic state, but emphasises that its campaign is for Syria, not for a global jihad. It has retained a Syrian leadership, saving the group from suspicions laid against others that are led by foreign fighters or include a lot of them. Ahrar al-Sham does not go in for suicide-bombings, preferring to use remote-controlled car bombs. It also carries out public works, mending roads and providing food, in contrast to other groups, whose predations upset the locals.

Also, by remaining independent of other groups—it refuses, for instance, to come under the umbrella of the West’s favourite commander, the Free Syrian Army’s Selim Idriss—it has avoided being labelled in the West as a terrorist group, as has happened to Jabhat al-Nusra, an al-Qaeda affiliate.

Some see the hand of Qatar behind its burgeoning success. “Ahrar al-Sham and its front is clearly positioning itself as an Islamist alternative to the disorganised moderate rebel fighters,” says Charles Lister of Jane’s Terrorism and Insurgency Centre in London. Its political arm is expanding too. Last month the Syrian Islamic Front, its umbrella, created a foreign-affairs department. It is active on Twitter. There have been reports that other Islamist groups, such as Saqour al-Sham, a leading member of the rival Syrian Islamic Liberation Front, may soon join the Syrian Islamic Front.

Hitherto the most prominent of the extreme Islamist groups has been Jabhat al-Nusra, which may have 7,000 or so fighters. But recently it has been bogged down in a power struggle with al-Qaeda in Iraq, led by Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. After Jabhat al-Nusra’s leaders, led by Abu Muhammad al-Golani, refused to submit to his rule, the group split: a more extreme branch merged with the Iraqi brethren, forming the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham. It has recently clashed with other Syrian groups, something Ahrar al-Sham has so far avoided. As Jabhat al-Nusra’s clout has weakened, Ahrar al-Sham’s has grown stronger
 

dapperbandit

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Been reading through this and it's such a complex mess.

When was the last time the Middle East was in such a state? The 1960's?

I don't believe this is going to have a happy ending, whatever happens. But I must confess my initial enthusiasm for the rebels has plummeted. It's clear that if Assad is toppled the war will not be over, the civil war will just enter another phase where the various groups with various affiliations shoot and bomb each other instead. For that reason I think Assad needs to win, if he is toppled, the fallout will have repurcussions for the entire region and the world.

An evil, evil man but at least he could potentially keep a lid on things.
 

ollin

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The comment section had this interesting info. Not sure if the numbers are true or not.

1. Syrian Islamic front
Est. nos. - 25,000 - extremist salafist militia
Leader: Abu Abdullah al-Hamawi

2. The Syrian Islamic Liberation front - Loosely knit Islamist alliance.
Est. nos. - 37,000
Leader: Ahmed Eissa al-sheikh

3. Farouk Battalions - moderate islamist
Est nos - 14,000
Leader: Osama Juneidi

4. Jabhat al-Nusra and The Islamic State Of Iraq - Both are al-Queda affiliates.
Est nos. - 6,000 - 7,000
Leader: Abu Mohammed al-Golani

5. Islamic Ahrar al-Sham Movement - Extreme salafists
Est nos. - 10,000
Leader: Abu Abdullah al-Hamawi

6. Syrian Martyrs Brigade - Salafists
Est nos. - 8,000
Leader: Jamaal Maarouf

7. Islam Brigade - Extreme salafists
Est nos.- Low thousands
leader: Zahran Alloush

8. Tawid Brigade - Moderate Islamist.
Est nos. - 12,000
Leader: Abdel Aziz Salama

9. Suquor al-sham Brigades - Moderate Islamist
Est nos: Several thousand
leader: Achmed Eissa al-Sheikh

Most of these groups operate under the moderate Free Syrian Army (FSA) banner in hopes of getting a piece of the aid pie. But they all operate independently, and there is no command and control in the FSA. The Islamists are in the majority. Any arms sent will end up in their hands. In Aleppo, for example, the islamists disarmed the smaller rebel factions fighting the govt.
 

liger05

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The comment section had this interesting info. Not sure if the numbers are true or not.

Hence why those who try and claim this isnt an Islamic uprising need to stop. Even if you were to remove ISIS or Jabhut Al Nusra (The AQ affiliated groups) there are other groups that seek to establish an Islamic State. There has been no hijacking from the 'Islamists'. The 'Islamists' were there from day 1.
 

liger05

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MSM not reporting it yet but many twitter accounts say huge Prison Break @ Abu Ghraib & Taj Prison in Iraq by the Islamic State of Iraq & Sham.
 

phosphor112

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He has expressed his support for the jihadist extremists before. It's nothing new.

I'm fully aware of this. It's sickening really. I've lost several relatives, and even more friends of the family in Iraq because of Jihadis and people that carry the same sentiment as him.

Too much "us vs them" mentality. Why can't they just agree on getting rid of the extremists? It's not in the best interests for Sunnis, Shias, Christians, etc. Is that too much to ask for?... heh... apparently.
 

liger05

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You make it sound like the release of Al-Qaeda and former Saddam supports is a good thing.

You mean free those who are tortured daily in those dungeons. Yes its a good thing!!

One account I have read from a prisoner who was at Abu Ghraib.

Forced to drink boiling water, kiss Khomeni's photo, stripped, beard and nails plucked.

Maybe if this prisons treated prisoners with some dignity I would feel different but anyone who feels the need to torture gets no sympathy from me.

It has been narrated by Saeed through his chain from Hibban bin Jabalah, that the Messenger of Allah (SAWS) said: Indeed it is obligatory upon the Muslims to free their captives or to pay their ransoms. Never lose faith in the mercy of Allah.
 

phosphor112

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You mean free those who are tortured daily in those dungeons. Yes its a good thing!!

One account I have read from a prisoner who was at Abu Ghraib.

Forced to drink boiling water, kiss Khomeni's photo, stripped, beard and nails plucked.

Maybe if this prisons treated prisoners with some dignity I would feel different but anyone who feels the need to torture gets no sympathy from me.

It has been narrated by Saeed through his chain from Hibban bin Jabalah, that the Messenger of Allah (SAWS) said: Indeed it is obligatory upon the Muslims to free their captives or to pay their ransoms. Never lose faith in the mercy of Allah.

If what you say is true, then, yes, it shouldn't happen. But those claims aren't substantiated. It honestly just sounds like propaganda to get more sunni on shia violence. I've NEVER ever met any Shia, Iranians included that have ever kissed, let alone KEPT a picture of Khomeni. Why would they? He has no bearing on their after life. I suppose there could be Shia that do that, and if so, it's stupid. Then again, there are a lot of stupid people that fall under the label of being "Muslim."

And, yes, you are right about the etiquette for keeping prisoners, but a lot of these people that have been captured have been plotting suicide bombings and killings of civilians AND other Muslims in the name of Allah. Astaghfirullah.

There are plenty of Moderate Islamists that you can support that allow Sunnis and Shias to live together, as our Prophet told us to (no kill our brothers and sisters of our Uma), but you keep showing your colors in support for these fringe groups as well. I don't support Assad. I'm not a Baathist. Saddam was a Baathist, and so is Assad, but I'd take him over the systematic killing of an entire sect and other sects, because Salafis have a chance of being at the helm.
 

liger05

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If what you say is true, then, yes, it shouldn't happen. But those claims aren't substantiated. It honestly just sounds like propaganda to get more sunni on shia violence. I've NEVER ever met any Shia, Iranians included that have ever kissed, let alone KEPT a picture of Khomeni. Why would they? He has no bearing on their after life. I suppose there could be Shia that do that, and if so, it's stupid. Then again, there are a lot of stupid people that fall under the label of being "Muslim."

And, yes, you are right about the etiquette for keeping prisoners, but a lot of these people that have been captured have been plotting suicide bombings and killings of civilians AND other Muslims in the name of Allah. Astaghfirullah.

There are plenty of Moderate Islamists that you can support that allow Sunnis and Shias to live together, as our Prophet told us to (no kill our brothers and sisters of our Uma), but you keep showing your colors in support for these fringe groups as well. I don't support Assad. I'm not a Baathist. Saddam was a Baathist, and so is Assad, but I'd take him over the systematic killing of an entire sect and other sects, because Salafis have a chance of being at the helm.

If those convicted are killers then they deserve to be punished, I have no issue with that. Whether they Sunni or Shia if they killing innocents then yes imprison them and make them face the punishment. However dont torture them, and make them suffer like those did under Saddam in prison. They may be the worst of the worst but torture isnt acceptable regardless.

Brother my support isnt restricted to those called the Jihadi's. My support is to anyone who is fighting against Assad and his allies. I dont see as a Sunni v Shia thing. Hezbollah just happen to be supporting Assad so yes I want them to lose but thats not because they are Shia thats simply cos have sided with the tyrant.

As for Iraq, just like the in Syria I want to see a Caliphate where Sunni and Shia’s live together like they did for centuries.
 

phosphor112

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If those convicted are killers then they deserve to be punished, I have no issue with that. Whether they Sunni or Shia if they killing innocents then yes imprison them and make them face the punishment. However dont torture them, and make them suffer like those did under Saddam in prison. They may be the worst of the worst but torture isnt acceptable regardless.
I agree 100%. I lost an uncle and a cousin through torture under Saddam's regime.

Brother my support isnt restricted to those called the Jihadi's. My support is to anyone who is fighting against Assad and his allies. I dont see as a Sunni v Shia thing. Hezbollah just happen to be supporting Assad so yes I want them to lose but thats not because they are Shia thats simply cos have sided with the tyrant.
I take your word for it, but I wouldn't be so quick to jump behind anyone just because they happen to be fighting for your same interests at the time. That's how the west has been screwed over so many times. They'd hop behind a radical group to fight off... lets say... the Soviets, or Iran, and then later on, they get hurt because that group ended up fighting them back... in the case of Afghanistan and Iraq.

As for Iraq, just like the in Syria I want to see a Caliphate where Sunni and Shia’s live together like they did for centuries.
It would be nice, but I don't see that ever happening again.
 

shinobi602

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Whoa.
BEIRUT (AP) — Syrian activists say government troops have killed at least 75 rebels over 24 hours in battles for control of the capital, Damascus.

The death toll reported by the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights on Monday included 49 rebels killed in an ambush in Damascus' northeastern suburb of Adra early Sunday. The group says an elite unit loyal to President Bashar Assad ambushed the rebels as they were trying to push into the city.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2013/07/22/syria-unrest/2573977/
 

liger05

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wor...militias-cleansing-Homs-of-Sunni-Muslims.html

The "Shabiha", a loyalist militia drawn largely from the Syrian president's Alawite sect, is systematically looting and then destroying the homes of any Sunnis who have fled the province, a key battleground in the country's civil war.

"They pushed out the rebel fighters and now they are trying to push out all the Sunnis," said Bilal, a 23-year-old from the Sunni village of Talkalakh in Homs province. "They took our houses, threatened us, destroyed our villages."

The 13th-century mosque of Khalid Ibn al-Walid in Homs, which was damaged by Syrian government airstrikes and shelling (AP)

Mr Assad's regime has trained its military might on rebel strongholds in Homs province, winning back the border towns of Qusayr and Talkalakh, and shelling areas of the provincial capital.

The offensive is so intense that rebels admit they cannot hold out for much longer. It has also taken on a sectarian character, with the army on Monday bombarding the Sunni mausoleum of Khaled bin Walid, a companion of Prophet Mohammed. Whether this was intentional or a mistake is unclear.

After each campaign, howver, Alawite civilians and loyalist paramilitaries from the National Defence Force have stormed the newly recaptured towns and villages, looting Sunni homes and often setting them on fire, with the apparent aim of ensuring that the owners have nothing left to return to.

"They even took the sinks of the bathrooms. The things they couldn't carry, they burnt," said Zacharia, a 23-year-old rebel fighter who escaped Talkalakh one week ago, after government troops stormed the town.

"After the army were finished, the Shabiha came: they divided the houses up between them, and started taking away the spoils."
 

phosphor112

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I honestly don't get this shit. It smells like propaganda. Nothing more.

74% of the population in Syria is Sunni. You're saying that this VAST MINORITY has the power to ethnically cleanse a group that is almost 6 times their size?

 

liger05

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I honestly don't get this shit. It smells like propaganda. Nothing more.

74% of the population in Syria is Sunni. You're saying that this VAST MINORITY has the power to ethnically cleanse a group that is almost 6 times their size?


The article is not talking about the whole of Syria. Its about Homs which is now under Assad/Hezbollah control.

You seem to be forgetting that many of the sunni civilians of Homs would of left there homes to flee the fighting. I dont see how its unbelievable that Assad would now be moving Alawite/Shite people into deserted Homs homes.

Statement by ISIS:their view of what happened in Tal Abyad,after cessation of hostilities,asks residents to return to there homes. ISIS statement forbids touching anyone's property, Arab or Kurd. Violators would be held accountable.

 

phosphor112

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The article is not talking about the whole of Syria. Its about Homs which is now under Assad/Hezbollah control.

You seem to be forgetting that many of the sunni civilians of Homs would of left there homes to flee the fighting. I dont see how its unbelievable that Assad would now be moving Alawite/Shite people into deserted Homs homes.

Statement by ISIS:their view of what happened in Tal Abyad,after cessation of hostilities,asks residents to return to there homes. ISIS statement forbids touching anyone's property, Arab or Kurd. Violators would be held accountable.

Checked with Polgeonow and yeah, you're right. 80% of Homs is under control of the government. Didn't realize they took Qusayr either.
 

liger05

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https://now.mmedia.me/lb/en/reportsfeatures/fsa-children-guns-are-heavy-but-we-will-bear-them

Ahmad, 15, has a gun strapped over his little shoulder and is wearing military fatigues. He is fighting on the frontline in plain sight of Syrian regime snipers scattered between destroyed buildings and streets. This desolate place is peopled only by members of the Unification Brigades (one of the Free Syrian Army's main fighting brigades) striving to protect areas won from the regime.

Ahmad tells his story shyly with a gravely voice that belies his age, saying: “I have been fighting on this front for a year.” He is far from the only child soldier; the opposition brigades have many members aged 15 to 18 fighting within their ranks.

Ahmad’s story began when he was injured in the shelling of Maarrat al-Naaman, his hometown in Idlib province. He was taken to a field hospital in Aleppo and when he could not make it back to his village, he joined the FSA. The young man with still-childlike facial feature goes on: “Early on during the revolution, I took part in many protests. I only thought about joining the armed resistance when so many of my family members died. I was shot in the abdomen, so I took up weapons to defend my country.”
 

liger05

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So now we're stuck with liger and his terrorist propaganda, sweet.

Yep the Daily Telegraph is such a terrible source for news. Channel 4 even worse. I'm just posting stories on the Syrian conflict.

http://www.channel4.com/news/syria-rebels-jihad-british-foreign-assad

She's a tall young woman, dressed in a hijab, complete with face veil, firing a gun. She speaks with a London accent, and calls herself "Maryam".

It's not her real name, but her commitment to the jihad is real enough: "These are our brothers and sisters and they need our help."

Maryam shoots a Kalashnikov for the camera, and then fires off a revolver. She'd like to fight, to become what she calls a martyr. But she's not a frontline fighter. She's a fighter's wife, with weapons for her own protection.

The latest pictures from Syria reveal a new insight into the lives of British citizens who've travelled to join the campaign inside rebel-held territory in the country's north.

Exclusively obtained by Channel 4 News, they were filmed by Bilal Abdul Kareem, an American Muslim convert who's living among western jihadi fighters and their families inside Syria, documenting their lives.

He says he wants to show the reality of the lives of these foreign jihadis.
 

Batman

Banned
Sep 19, 2012
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As they should.

Not our problem nothing we should put our noses in.

Let Syrians handle Syrian problems.

It's quite similar to something that happened over 70 years ago while the whole world stood still. This situation could have been contained two years ago when Assad decided to start his genocide, now the whole world will suffer in the coming years because of it.
 

archnemesis

Member
Oct 19, 2007
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backloggery.com
Why would you call it a genocide when you have an equal amount of death of both sides? The Alawite minority couldn't exterminate the large Sunni majority even if they wanted to.
 

L0st Id3ntity

Member
Mar 21, 2007
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Whoa.
At least 150 Syrian regime forces have been killed in Khan al-Assal, a town in Aleppo province at the centre of an alleged chemical weapons strike, monitors said Friday.
BEIRUT (Reuters) - Syrian rebels say they have overrun army positions in the north and south of the country this week, including an offensive in which a rights monitoring group said 51 soldiers were executed.
http://uk.news.yahoo.com/150-syrian-regime-foces-killed-aleppo-town-151251262.html

http://mobile.reuters.com/article/idUSBRE96P0GM20130726?irpc=932
 
Oct 24, 2012
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Denmark, Copenhagen
Syrian government troops have won control of a central district of Homs, crushing one of the last rebel bastions of the city once dubbed “the capital of the revolution”, activists and state media reported.

After besieging the district of Khalidiya for more than two years, its capture is a symbolic and strategic coup for the regime, raising the morale of its weary soldiers and pushing the insurgency from its most important stronghold in central Syria.
In a victorious broadcast Syrian state television announced the “collapse of the terrorists’ citadel” of Khaldiyeh, claiming that the army had “restored security and stability across the neighbourhood”.

On Monday, the Skype accounts of more than a dozen activists who had spent two years living under siege in the area, always plugged into a satellite Internet connection to send news of government attacks to the outside world, were ominously offline.

Two media activists who managed to escape Khalidiya just hours before government troops entered the neighbourhood told the Daily Telegraph that “almost all”, around 90 per cent, of the district had been retaken.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wor...rmy-crushes-key-rebel-stronghold-in-Homs.html
 
Oct 24, 2012
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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wor...resident-Bashar-al-Assad-joins-Instagram.html

Syrian president Bashar al-Assad has created an account with photo sharing social media tool Instagram, in an attempt to show his more likeable side.

Having realised the value of being loved by your public, the Syrian president, who is accused of waging chemical warfare against his own people, has uploaded photos in which he can be seen comforting the sick, feeding the elderly and exchanging kisses with star-struck citizens.
The account, which takes the handle ‘syrianpresidency’, features numerous pictures of the Syrian First Lady Asma al-Assad, who grew up in Britain before marrying Mr Assad in 2000.
The account was only launched last week, around the same time that the Syrian civil war's death toll surpassed 100,000 bodies, a rate of 7,000 deaths per month.
Syria’s civil war has created heightened violence between Muslim factions beyond its own borders. Earlier this week a series of coordinated car bombings throughot Iraq, which saw Sunni Muslims targeted their Shia counterparts, was blamed on the negative influence of Syrian polarisation.
Despite the account only having existed for one week, it has already uploaded more than 50 photos and garnered over 1,200 subscribers
 

liger05

Member
Sep 5, 2009
4,286
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Just seen these quotes on my twitter feed. Ayma al Zawahiri latest speech talking about the importance of Khilafah.

"When the ruling of Islam is established in Sham and the Ummah unites upon a leader the he is our choice (we will follow)"

"Al Qaeda wants a Khalifah whom the Ummah is pleased and the majority agreed"

"An Islamic State will be declared with the co operation of all mujahideen and nobles"

"People of sham does not want to snatch your right of choosing a muslim leader who will govern by the Quran and Sunnah"

Just stood out to me as I dont remember them talking about Khilafah so much before.
 
Jun 7, 2013
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It's funny how some people say that sunnis are getting ethnic cleansed in Syria when the SAA is mostly sunnis. The propaganda from the west and from the GCC is literal bullshit. Also twitter nor facebook is not really a source.

The fact about this is that a lot of people where brainwashed into fighting through a huge propaganda campaign early on with foreign expats contributing money and equipment (such as satellite phones) to agents provactors. Then the 7 second youtube clips with no context and often fake where produced to locals to get them agitated.

Since the beginning, the "resistance" has been using weapons against the security forces and it was never "peaceful" demonstrations. The same sort of blueprint was used in Libya which clips would be shown of soldiers with their hands tied behind their backs and executed by the rebels but then said that the security apparatus killed them for refusing orders. A lie to show how evil the SAA was as well as to try to get parts of the military to switch sides.

The rebels are nothing more then twisted murderous delusional traitors and mercenaries. Their tactics include using child soldiers, suicide bombers, building defensive positions in highly populated areas, and massacring minorities then claiming they are shabiba which is mostly lies. They only deserve defeat and destruction.
 

liger05

Member
Sep 5, 2009
4,286
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0
It's funny how some people say that sunnis are getting ethnic cleansed in Syria when the SAA is mostly sunnis. The propaganda from the west and from the GCC is literal bullshit. Also twitter nor facebook is not really a source.

The fact about this is that a lot of people where brainwashed into fighting through a huge propaganda campaign early on with foreign expats contributing money and equipment (such as satellite phones) to agents provactors. Then the 7 second youtube clips with no context and often fake where produced to locals to get them agitated.

Since the beginning, the "resistance" has been using weapons against the security forces and it was never "peaceful" demonstrations. The same sort of blueprint was used in Libya which clips would be shown of soldiers with their hands tied behind their backs and executed by the rebels but then said that the security apparatus killed them for refusing orders. A lie to show how evil the SAA was as well as to try to get parts of the military to switch sides.

The rebels are nothing more then twisted murderous delusional traitors and mercenaries. Their tactics include using child soldiers, suicide bombers, building defensive positions in highly populated areas, and massacring minorities then claiming they are shabiba which is mostly lies. They only deserve defeat and destruction.

So this never happened. All lies.

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-503543_162-20057082-503543.html

http://www.alarabiya.net/articles/2013/02/09/265284.html

People have had enough living under a tyrant. No surprise in that!!
 
Jun 7, 2013
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So this never happened. All lies.

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-503543_162-20057082-503543.html

http://www.alarabiya.net/articles/2013/02/09/265284.html

People have had enough living under a tyrant. No surprise in that!!

A lot of things happen and a lot of things are propaganda used to rally the masses. Seeing as how this article is a reprint from Globalposts I can't really determine the legitimacy of the article. A "Syrian reporter" also does not lead credence to it. Since a lot of "Syrian reporters" tend to be in Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Qatar, and Israel when they make their reports.

But now we get to the meat and bones of this. You actually use alarabiya.net as a source. Laughable since it's a propaganda news outlet of one of the most oppressive and backwards regimes in the world. Most of the articles from there about Syria are sectarian lies and forgeries. The only people who take alarabiya seriously are those that are brainwashed in sectarianism hate.
 

liger05

Member
Sep 5, 2009
4,286
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A lot of things happen and a lot of things are propaganda used to rally the masses. Seeing as how this article is a reprint from Globalposts I can't really determine the legitimacy of the article. A "Syrian reporter" also does not lead credence to it. Since a lot of "Syrian reporters" tend to be in Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Qatar, and Israel when they make their reports.

But now we get to the meat and bones of this. You actually use alarabiya.net as a source. Laughable since it's a propaganda news outlet of one of the most oppressive and backwards regimes in the world. Most of the articles from there about Syria are sectarian lies and forgeries. The only people who take alarabiya seriously are those that are brainwashed in sectarianism hate.

Al Arabiya was just re-printing the original article from the NYT

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/09/w...age-refugee-who-helped-ignite-syrias-war.html
 
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