The "Select all images with a street sign" reCAPTCHA is a godless creation of evil

May 21, 2013
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#1
I hate these things with a passion. Does the post of the sign count sometimes or not? No matter what I do, be it selecting every single square with any inkling of sign or selecting the general amount of squares that hold a majority of the sign these damn things work maybe less than 10% of the time. I've gotten locked out of accounts because of this garbage in the past before I wised up and used the audio option instead (which works every time as long as I don't get a garbled mess to listen to).

The weird thing is these didn't always be so awful. Did a recent browser update or update on Google's side completely screw these things up?
 
Mar 5, 2014
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#4
I hate these things with a passion. Does the post of the sign count sometimes or not? No matter what I do, be it selecting every single square with any inkling of sign or selecting the general amount of squares that hold a majority of the sign these damn things work maybe less than 10% of the time. I've gotten locked out of accounts because of this garbage in the past before I wised up and used the audio option instead (which works every time as long as I don't get a garbled mess to listen to).

The weird thing is these didn't always be so awful. Did a recent browser update or update on Google's side completely screw these things up?
This thought has gone through everyone's head and no one is certain for sure.
 
Jun 26, 2009
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#5
this is one of the most evil things I've ever seen on the "regular everyday" net next to the auto-play flash videos. Just pure evil.
 
May 21, 2013
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#7
An honorary mention goes to the other reCAPTCHA where it has you select images of something where they sssllllooooowwwwlllly disappear and reappear for seemingly no other reason than to annoy you.
 
Feb 6, 2014
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#9
I've never got this wrong and it's a crap ton better than retyping those awful words .

I literally only select the pic where I see exactly what they describe. Same with the storefront one.
 
Dec 5, 2012
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www.neogaf.com
#12
The worst one is when it asks you to click on pictures of shopfronts and sometimes the pictures are of doctors' surgeries or banks.

The pedant inside me just won't let me begrudgingly click them.
 

Vilix

I think Bayonetta and Samus are more iconic than Lara Croft.
Aug 9, 2006
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#16
I haven't had any problems. Much better than typing those number and letter combinations. I can barely makes those out.
 
Jul 17, 2013
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Seattle
#17
As first post implied, they're getting more complex because the problems we're teaching computers to solve are growing more complex due to the vast amounts of data we've collected on simpler problems (through CAPTCHA and image tagging).
 

Moose Biscuits

It would be extreamly painful...
Oct 21, 2016
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#19
I love when there's a 'highlight all vehicles' picture with a roadsign in it, I highlight the sign and it goes through.

Because you know there's a bunch of people just not paying attention and now Google's robots won't know what cars are.
 
Dec 5, 2012
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#20
My job involves looking up cases in a court system. I have to do these a couple dozen times a day. It slows us down significantly.
Unless reCAPTCHA has changed, these photo quizzes should only appear as a second test.

They should only be triggered if the temporarily recorded cursor movement you make to move the mouse to the "I'm not a robot" checkbox looks 'un-human'.
 
Jan 20, 2013
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#23
Agreed wholeheartedly

does the post count

some of the images might have bits of cars in them in the lower left pixel

send me a text code to type would be preferred by miles

captcha can burn in the fires of eternal damnation
 

JBourne

maybe tomorrow it rains
Jan 9, 2013
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#25
Unless reCAPTCHA has changed, these photo quizzes should only appear as a second test.

They should only be triggered if the temporarily recorded cursor movement you make to move the mouse to the "I'm not a robot" checkbox looks 'un-human'.
I don't even get a checkbox. Logging into the court system just means hitting "Accept" to agree to their terms. The first login of the day won't trigger it. Every other login for the rest of the day requires it.
 
Apr 15, 2010
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#29
I hate these things with a passion. Does the post of the sign count sometimes or not? No matter what I do, be it selecting every single square with any inkling of sign or selecting the general amount of squares that hold a majority of the sign these damn things work maybe less than 10% of the time. I've gotten locked out of accounts because of this garbage in the past before I wised up and used the audio option instead (which works every time as long as I don't get a garbled mess to listen to).

The weird thing is these didn't always be so awful. Did a recent browser update or update on Google's side completely screw these things up?
No, the problems that recaptcha are trying to solve just got more difficult. In the past, recaptcha was used to digitize books, and so "tell us what this word says," would verify that you're not a robot, but it would also help digitize old books by spreading out the work of digitizing the book to millions/billions of internet users.

But, books are easy. Numbers on signs are easy. Image processing and image recognition is more difficul and as we've solved the easy problems, now we're getting to the harder ones.

This has also been introduced in conjunction with Google's greatest captcha service...



I am always so happy when a form chooses this type of captcha. Problem for the captcha service creators is that this doesn't give you a lot usable data back and it can be more resource intensive than the others.
 
May 27, 2011
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Austin, TX
#34
The worst. I'd be surprised if a human person actually checked these things before they OK them.

This has also been introduced in conjunction with Google's greatest captcha service...



I am always so happy when a form chooses this type of captcha. Problem for the captcha service creators is that this doesn't give you a lot usable data back and it can be more resource intensive than the others.
How does this one work actually?
 
Feb 8, 2008
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#41
How does this one work actually?
It's checking for things like impossible/improbable movements from your mouse, as well as other activities too. Likewise, the "Select all images with <x>" types of CAPTCHA aren't looking for a precise answer. They're simply looking for enough right to prove you're human.

They do a lot of behind the scenes things that average users are unaware of.
 
May 14, 2015
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#43
What always gets me is that sometimes I only have to do it once, but sometimes I have to do it twice even I'm following the same metric. So I don't know if I've done it correctly or screwed up somehow and it throws me off everytime.
 
Jun 22, 2013
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#45
The worst. I'd be surprised if a human person actually checked these things before they OK them.

How does this one work actually?
https://security.stackexchange.com/a/78814

Google doesn't reveal the specifics for obvious reasons but it's probably looking at stuff like IP address, location, browser cookies, OS, etc. to infer whether you're likely to be a bot or not. I've noticed when I do these in incognito mode it usually fails and asks me to do a normal reCAPTCHA.
 

Lord Error

Insane For Sony
Jun 8, 2004
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#46
I never really fully bought the story that we're teaching these systems anything. They already have to know the answer to the question, otherwise, what's the point in checking what you answered.
 
May 13, 2009
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#47
The worst. I'd be surprised if a human person actually checked these things before they OK them.



How does this one work actually?
The first rule of robots is that they have to tell the truth. No matter how much the robot wants to act like a human-to BE human-the robot can't check off the "I'm not a robot" box . It's prime directive #1. This is why we'll always be safe from robots. I know this from double-majoring in computers and robots in school.

Real explanation: https://www.wired.com/2014/12/google-one-click-recaptcha/