The top 400 women in esports combined earn less than half of what the top man makes

XVision84

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Also worth noting how represented China is in this. There's different cultural customs meaning females competing in tournaments isn't as normalised.

Beyond that, I wonder what'll happen to these guys once they get older. None of the top 10 are over 27. It's obviously not a career with much longevity, even for sports.
True, part of that stems from China having many strong Dota 2 teams while, for example, North America only has 1 or 2. Also most teams are multinational whereas Chinese teams are exclusively Chinese.

At least in the Dota 2 scene, many players become coaches, casters, or analysts after they retire in their late 20s.

It would be nice if women could compete in these tournaments too, I think there are cultural and social barriers against it (even in western society).
 
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Boss Mog

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What are their rankings compared to the men. If the top woman can't beat the man ranked 100 then why should she get payed more than him? There's no biological advantage in esports so men and women should compete together and let the chips fall where they may.
 

DeepEnigma

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What are their rankings compared to the men. If the top woman can't beat the man ranked 100 then why should she get payed more than him? There's no biological advantage in esports so men and women should compete together and let the chips fall where they may.

;)
 

A.Romero

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Isn't this the same situation with pretty much every sport? I bet is closely related to how popular and good they are.

On the other hand, female streamers probably make way more than male streamers save a few exceptions....
 

ROMhack

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Daigo is almost 40 and he's still getting top 8 consistently. Not as good as in his prime but still holding on.
It probably depends a lot on the game too. I imagine once you get older and lose your precision you're pretty much out of luck for FPS.
Oh fair enough, shows my ignorance. I don't know much about eSports really.
 

DeepEnigma

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This is stupid, because DotA 2's insanely high prize pool skews everything. Most people don't earn anywhere near what the top 5 players do.
These ideological driven articles are always less than half truths, and omits information that refutes the message.
 
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Katsura

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As well as their combined earnings not even touching the top male player, no women at all feature in the top 300 earners in esports. The top male earner is Dota 2 player Johan Sundstein, who has won $6,889,591.79 from tournaments.
In womens’ esports, the top two players’ total earnings are: Sasha “Scarlett” Hostyn, at $333,456.35; and Katherine “Mystik” Gunn, at $122,000.00. The top 400 women combined have earned $3,030,000.
Sasha “Scarlett” Hostyn comes in at 329 in the list of highest paid esports professionals. She is the only woman in the top 500 earners.

---

Missing data: ad revenue and sponsorship revenue generated by the figures involved. :pie_thinking:
How do the top women players place in tournaments compared to top male players? I assume they're mixed gender contests. In other words, are women getting paid less for winning a given tournament than males? Or is this another moron 'journalist' who wants special treatment for women? Also, gender pay gap lol. Sure, there is a pay gap if you use 4th grade math to calculate average wages and you don't account for any other factors such as overtime etc.
 
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Do these retards not know how money is made in professional sports / esports? Winnings and sponsorships...and to get sponsorships you need to be popular and for that there generally needs to be a reasonable chance you might actually win. Furthermore your earnings will vary wildly depending on what exactly you're playing...and exactly what tournaments you're competing in. This isn't evidence of a gender pay gap...if it's evidence of anything it's that the top professional Dota 2 player, who happens to be male, makes copious money.
 
Dec 14, 2008
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Today in people who literally don't know how pay in professional sports works.

I bet the top 400 female basketball players don't make half of what LeBron makes. Someone get the outrage train revved up!
 
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Woo-Fu

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There's nothing stopping an all-female team from playing the open qualifiers for The International and ultimately winning the whole thing and getting their names high on the e-sports earning list. Notail won the last two and has a bunch of major wins under his belt, he isn't going to be dethroned by anybody in the near future.

I think it has a lot more to do with what an incredible gamble it is to say, "I'm going to make a living doing this.", and young males being more likely to think that it is the right call than young women. Dota2 in particular requires an extreme level of commitment to even be good at the game, much less world class.
 
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Cosmogony

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It would be nice if women could compete in these tournaments too, I think there are cultural and social barriers against it (even in western society).
Barriers?
In western societies?
Sure.
That's why you're about to describe them in detail and present the necessary collection of hard data that proves your point.

Go ahead.
 

Fbh

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It's the same as with regular sports. It's part of the entertainment business, there isn't some universal right to be paid to play any sort of "sport". You earn what you generate

How good are they? How much viewership do they generate? How many sponsors and advertising deals do they attract? Etc.
If the answer to all of those questions is "the same or more as men" then, sure, we have problem. If not fuck off
 

Northeastmonk

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Why do some women hate video games so much yet go crazy for stuff like college sports and the NFL? Answer that question because that bugs me more than this.
 

XVision84

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Barriers?
In western societies?
Sure.
That's why you're about to describe them in detail and present the necessary collection of hard data that proves your point.

Go ahead.
Of course, there are barriers in every society. Go to any high school or middle school and you'll find that kids are teased for performing activities outside of their gender roles. I find it hard to believe that you haven't encountered a single barrier in your life.

Females, on the whole, don't play that many hardcore games. You're more likely to do something if your peers do it too and if society deems it as proper. This isn't absolute (obviously people can rebel), but these pressures exist everywhere.

A barrier doesn't have to mean that someone legally can't do something. That's why I specifically said social/cultural barriers, meaning they are either looked down upon or not enforced as strongly. Very different from some 3rd world societies where a woman literally cannot do something by law.

Go look at Twitch chat when a woman shows up in an esports gaming stream. They're sexualized and discriminated, to an extent. The same does not occur when males show up and this is because esports is dominated by males.

You're free to disagree with me, I'd be more than willing to discuss.
 

AlphaMale

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Then tell them to git gud.
Exactly this. Just cuz the top male makes $6M doesn't mean the top female has to make the same when she's ranked 300th overall (which puts them at the pay they're getting).

If a female had won the Fortnite championship last month, then she would've walked away with a cool $3M. She wouldn't have made penny less, just cuz she's female.
 

rockyt

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This is sport so it is looked at differently. It depends on how much is brought in via sponsorship, your agent, and the contracts. They need to bring in more money via sponsorship to get agents to make better contracts. Having lots of viewers mean nothing if the money is not their to pay them.
 

Cosmogony

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Of course, there are barriers in every society.
Claimed, but not shown.

Go to any high school or middle school and you'll find that kids are teased for performing activities outside of their gender roles.
Oh, I see. You're a member of the Imprecise-language-is the-best-kind school of thought.
In this context, a barrier is a systemic obstacle or circumstance deliberately put in place to achieve a certain goal.

You are not entitled to having others hold certain opinions of you to your liking. Others can hold whatever opinion they want about you and your conduct. It's their right and therefore It can't possibly be described as a barrier. Barriers get removed. The freely held and freely expressed opinions of others are not to be silenced in a free open society, even when you happen to dislike them.

I find it hard to believe that you haven't encountered a single barrier in your life.
When did I claim that?
The Festival of Imprecise Language continues.

Females, on the whole, don't play that many hardcore games.
Who's stopping them in western societies?

You're more likely to do something if your peers do it too and if society deems it as proper. This isn't absolute (obviously people can rebel), but these pressures exist everywhere.
Peer pressure is not a barrier.
Barriers get removed.
In a free society, opinions are not treated as barriers. Others disliking your hobbies is not a barrier. If it were, you'd have to remove, I. e. , silence, them for female gamers to game more. Do you have a different society in mjind, a society that is no longer free nor open?

A barrier doesn't have to mean that someone legally can't do something. That's why I specifically said social/cultural barriers, meaning they are either looked down upon or not enforced as strongly. Very different from some 3rd world societies where a woman literally cannot do something by law.
It is terribly imprecise to describe opinions as barriers.
See above.

Go look at Twitch chat when a woman shows up in an esports gaming stream. They're sexualized and discriminated, to an extent.
Define sexualizing.
What is the moral problem with sexualizing grown women?
Define discrimination.
In what way are they discriminated against?

The same does not occur when males show up and this is because esports is dominated by males.
I'll wait for your evidence .
Meanwhile, while you're rummaging, could it be because heterosexual men regard women differently?
 

EverydayBeast

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My first take away is gaming works for everyone, fits any gender and great looking graphic op gaming is a great hobby, sport etc. the competitive scene is meant for anyone to go toe-to-toe, I wouldn't get so emotional over a stat.
 
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Micolash

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I think more women who have the skills should get into esports then. Almost all of those in the top of the ladders in competitive games are overwhelmingly men, it just seems like women don't have much interest in competitive gaming.
 
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Lmao at using this to try to prove there's a gender pay gap, vg247 are some retards. YOUR EARNINGS DEPEND ON HOW MUCH YOU BRING IN, if they are bringing in less money and eyes and ranking lower how in the fuck do you expect them to be paid the same? Where's the money supposed to come from? There's a saying you tell little kids, money doesn't grow on trees, looks like these retards at vg247 didn't get the message.
 
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Gamernyc78

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So is this the same premise as the US men and soccer team situation? They were harping about not getting equal pay but fucking failed to mention tht men's soccer viewership is millions more as well as revenue. These fucking ppl sometimes are ridiculous.
 

XVision84

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Claimed, but not shown.



Oh, I see. You're a member of the Imprecise-language-is the-best-kind school of thought.
In this context, a barrier is a systemic obstacle or circumstance deliberately put in place to achieve a certain goal.

You are not entitled to having others hold certain opinions of you to your liking. Others can hold whatever opinion they want about you and your conduct. It's their right and therefore It can't possibly be described as a barrier. Barriers get removed. The freely held and freely expressed opinions of others are not to be silenced in a free open society, even when you happen to dislike them.



When did I claim that?
The Festival of Imprecise Language continues.



Who's stopping them in western societies?



Peer pressure is not a barrier.
Barriers get removed.
In a free society, opinions are not treated as barriers. Others disliking your hobbies is not a barrier. If it were, you'd have to remove, I. e. , silence, them for female gamers to game more. Do you have a different society in mjind, a society that is no longer free nor open?



It is terribly imprecise to describe opinions as barriers.
See above.



Define sexualizing.
What is the moral problem with sexualizing grown women?
Define discrimination.
In what way are they discriminated against?



I'll wait for your evidence .
Meanwhile, while you're rummaging, could it be because heterosexual men regard women differently?
I claimed and showed it. Just because you disagree, it doesn't mean evidence is not evidence. I don't know how to split quotes up like you did, so sorry if it's hard to follow. I addressed everything paragraph by paragraph.

I'm not a member of that school of thought and I'm confused as to what that entails. Define to me the stance you apparently think I have. When did I say that barriers are a systemic obstacle that are all put in place deliberately? They can be a product of interactions and expectations, which are in every society. Do you not interact with the people around you? Do you not form expectations regarding their behaviours? Norms exist everywhere.

I never claimed to be entitled to any of those things. I agree with this entire paragraph. It would be best if you didn't assume my stance on subjects since that's counterproductive in an argument.

When you say "Barriers? In Western societies? Sure." It can be easily interpreted that you're being sarcastic and implying that barriers do not exist in western society. My mistake if that wasn't your intent.

I gave you examples in my previous statement of what's deterring them. I say deter and not stop because, as I stated before, this isn't something they absolutely cannot do. It just isn't encouraged and, in some ways, discouraged.

I agree that peer pressure is not in itself a barrier. However, peer pressure leads to barriers and I believe is a product of barriers (like a cycle). I never advocated for silencing anyone. If you were raised in a family and environment that heavily discourages something, that would lead to a social barrier. You may break the barrier and do it anyways, but that doesn't mean it's easy and you won't face heavy criticism. I don't see why barriers must be absolute, as you seem to be claiming. If I'm mixing up official terminologies in some field of study, then feel free to correct me. This is what I mean by barriers.

Majority opinions that influence one's actions can act as barriers because they have a directive influence. If you build a wall around a river, it's a barrier. That's because it directs the river in a certain direction. Is it impossible for the river to break the barrier? No. With enough pressure, the barrier will break. It doesn't stop the barrier from being a barrier, maybe just not a very strong one.

Sexualizing is making comments regarding their body in a sexual way. Effectively objectifying her. I'm not arguing the morality of it. I'm saying that it happens. Many women do not like that and it might deter them from leading down that route.

The same goes for discrimination. Saying that a woman is shit at playing a game because she is a woman is discrimination. Saying that a woman should spend their time in the kitchen is discrimination. It happens, it influences people. Am I saying we should start a revolution and turn over society? Nope. I'm saying it happens and I would consider that a barrier. Barriers are everywhere, sometimes justly so, and I think it's a product of our interactions. You can't have a completely free society, that would be an absolute disaster. We have laws and limits to our "free speech" for a reason.

Heterosexual men do regard women differently. Women regard women differently. I regard people differently than you do, we are our own people. Not sure what the significance of your question is.
 
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nkarafo

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Well, males can't sell bath water for 30$ a piece so they have to get that extra money from somewhere.
 
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Alebrije

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Streamers earn a lot of money even the ones that are in the $35,000.00 per year are near the average income in the U.S.

Average Income in the U.S.

Recently, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) released their report on the Usual Weekly Earnings of Wage and Salary Workers. Using information from the fourth fiscal quarter of 2018, the BLS claims that in that quarter, the median income for a full-time wage or salary worker on a weekly basis was $900. For a 40-hour work week, this translates to a yearly income of approximately $46,800. This is a 5% increase on the previous year.


There is always gender gap in jobs , that is something that has to change but in entertening its not about gender is how about good you are.
 
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Cosmogony

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I claimed and showed it. Just because you disagree, it doesn't mean evidence is not evidence.
Claims are not evidence.
Evidence in support of the claim that women suffer significant backlash for picking up a controller or getting into e-sports would be a study showing statistically significant causation of the former by the latter.

I don't know how to split quotes up like you did, so sorry if it's hard to follow. I addressed everything paragraph by paragraph.
Reply to a post. Break down what you're replying to into sections. Select each section. Go to the ellipsis menu and choose " Quote. Alternatively, you can manually type [quo te] at the start and [/quo te] and the end of each paragraph or section. it'll do the trick.

I'm not a member of that school of thought and I'm confused as to what that entails. Define to me the stance you apparently think I have.
In open free societies, opinions don't qualify as barriers, for reasons already explained.

When did I say that barriers are a systemic obstacle that are all put in place deliberately?
You didn't. Neither did I claim you did.
I offered what I consider to be a clear objective definition.

They can be a product of interactions and expectations, which are in every society. Do you not interact with the people around you? Do you not form expectations regarding their behaviours? Norms exist everywhere.
Tell me, in your mind, what sort of tangible penalties do women face for picking up a controller in this day and age?

I never claimed to be entitled to any of those things. I agree with this entire paragraph. It would be best if you didn't assume my stance on subjects since that's counterproductive in an argument.
When you claim peer pressure - the opinions others have and express - amounts to a barrier you seem to be suggesting that, as a barrier, peer pressure must be removed so the noble goal of having more female gamers is achieved.

No.
Let the peers hold and express the opinions they want to hold and express. Let the future female gamer learn not to award that much importance to them or just cave in, if gaming is less important to her than the opinion of her peers.

When you say "Barriers? In Western societies? Sure." It can be easily interpreted that you're being sarcastic and implying that barriers do not exist in western society. My mistake if that wasn't your intent.
That's why I provided a precise definition of the term. Unless otherwise stated, whenever I use the term I am referring back to this definition.

Third-party opinions - peer pressure - do not qualify as a barrier.

I gave you examples in my previous statement of what's deterring them. I say deter and not stop because, as I stated before, this isn't something they absolutely cannot do. It just isn't encouraged and, in some ways, discouraged.
Let's say I agree with this depiction, for the sake of argument. You're still burdened with the need to present evidence that's the case, but let's set that aside.

That's a free open society operating healthily.

I think you should act in this or that manner and I am letting you know. You then freely decide how to proceed. I then freely react to your decision. And so on.

There's nothing to rectify here. That's a free open society doing its thing.

I agree that peer pressure is not a barrier.
Didn't you cite it as an example of a barrier in western societies?

However, peer pressure leads to barriers.
Such as?
Be specific.

I never advocated for silencing anyone. If you were raised in a family and environment that heavily discourages something, that would be a barrier.
You're contradicting yourself.
Family pressure is a form of peer pressure.
You said peer pressure is not a barrier. Now family pressure is?

You may break the barrier and do it anyways, but that doesn't mean it's easy and you won't face heavy criticism. I don't see why barriers must be absolute, as you seem to be claiming.
I never used the word absolute. The concept is likewise nowhere to be found in the definition I provided.

Majority opinions that influence one's actions can be seen as barriers
You're contradicting yourself.
Majority opinions are peer pressure.

because they have a directive influence.
It's up to the invidiual to decide, ultimately.


If you build a wall around a river, it's a barrier. That's because it directs the river in a certain direction. Is it impossible for the river to break the barrier? No. With enough pressure, the barrier will break. It doesn't stop the barrier from being a barrier, maybe just not a very strong one.
See, that's the problem with imprecise language. When you see the opinons of others as barriers you end up with twisted conclusions. It seems you are likely to put the blame on them, instead of owning up your decisions.

Is me not liking strawberry juice a barrier to you drinking it?
Is me telling you shouldn't dress uplike a drag queen a barrier to you dressing up however you feel like dressing up?

And I'm still waiting for evidence that shows women face reproach in impactful and statistically relevant ways in today's western societies. Do you have evidence for your claims?

Sexualizing is making comments regarding their body in a sexual way.
You could say it's rude, in certain situations.

Effectively objectifying her.
This is a popular but ridiculous claim.
Praising or criticizing someone for their looks is no more objectifying than praising or criticizing someone for their IQ.
It's not.
Commenting on this or that personal charactertic does not necessarily entail the belief such person is reduceable to this or that characteristic. If I say your watch looks cheap, that doesn't mean I am objectifying you as a cheap-watch wearer.

I completely reject your assertion.

I'm not arguing regarding the morality of it. I'm saying that it happens. Many women do not like that and it might deter them from leading down that route.
I suppose they can block those individuals, no?

Again, this is the big picture: so far you have yet to present a case under which systemic barriers exist against women picking up a controller or getting into e-sports seriously.

The same goes for discrimination.
First define the term.

Saying that a woman is shit at playing a game because she is a woman is discrimination.
No, it isn't.
You're terribly imprecise with words.

In this context, discrimination is behaviour, typically treating someone unfairly, behaviour sourced in the belief that a certain group is inferior to another. Therefore, opinions, even outlandish absurd opinions, are not discrimination.

Saying that a woman should spend their time in the kitchen is discrimination.
Opinions, even absurd opinions, do not amount to discrimination.

It happens, it influences people. Am I saying we should start a revolution and turn over society? Nope. I'm saying it happens and I would consider that a barrier.
Opinions are not barriers.

Barriers are everywhere, sometimes justly so, and I think it's a product of our interactions. You can't have a completely free society, that would be an absolute disaster. We have laws and limits to our "free speech" for a reason.
Yes and the limits to free speech have historically been very precise:
1. Incitement to violence.
2. Child pornography.

None of that is at stake here.
Please.

Heterosexual men do regard women differently. Women regard women differently.
Obviously, "regard differently" as in "from other heterosexual men".

I regard people differently than you do, we are our own people. Not sure what the significance of your question is.
See above.
 
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lol wot.


There is no such thing as "top 400" for they are all equally bad and earn according to their level, which is nonexistent. A team like the Zombie Unicorns is just propaganda and they have to play in low-tier tournaments since they cannot take on the big boys.

If any, women would have a great advantage over guys should they have any gaming level. (hint: the advantage is related to their looks and charm)


This convenience marriage between colectivism and feminism needs to stop. Respect the market laws or get the fuck out.
 
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It's based on skill, education and demand.
It really comes down to that..... as well as government and company budgets being able to afford the employee salary pool.

Reason why people deviate from that is because in life millions (probably billions out of the 7 billion people) are lazy fucks and want freebie handouts.

No different than that dude sitting at home getting welfare cheques. Nothing would make him happier than getting the monthly stipend bumped up 10% for nothing.
 

Justin9mm

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There are some harsh facts in life that people need to accept like..

Men are generally stronger than women due to their genetic and body structure make up.
Men are better gamers because they have the ability to make quick 'rational' decisions!
 

CrisPy2019

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So what? The most powerful woman in Germany(Angela Merkel) has more power than 40million German males.

You can't just pick 1 aspect and compare that. If you do you are an unbelievably stupid idiot.

Is e-sports a male thing mostly? If yes therefore the chance that the best player is male is higher. Hell that most good players are male is higher.

Are most fans male? If yes
Is it worth to market and invest alot of money for an e-sports player where only a fraction of the fans can identify with, and therefore there is less return on the investment of marketing etc?

Did the female player ask for more money? In negotiations men are more agressive and women more agreeable.

Ignoring all of that and more makes you an idiot PERIOD
 
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XVision84

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Claims are not evidence.
Evidence in support of the claim that women suffer significant backlash for picking up a controller or getting into e-sports would be a study showing statistically significant causation of the former by the latter.
Never said they were, I said "claiming and showing", evidence would fall under the "showing" part not the claim part. I am using evidence, but it's anecdotal which I can understand is limited. I don't have the time at the moment to find a specific study although I'm sure something of the sort has been done. It's unreasonable to expect such a thing from a casual debate. This isn't a formal debate, it's not like I prepared a set of studies to go off of and I don't exactly keep them lying around for NeoGAF.

Tell me, in your mind, what sort of tangible penalties do women face for picking up a controller in this day and age?
I think this has to do with many things. From my experiences growing up, video games were seen as childish entertainment. I've rarely seen women discuss gaming amongst themselves or with others. If you're the only one in your peer group playing games, it's more likely you'll do something else to fit in. This doesn't happen with everyone, but it's a well known tendency. I don't think a woman will be harshly bullied for picking up a controller, I think that she is less likely to spend a significant portion of her time doing so due to 1) decreased exposure to video games 2) smaller social incentive 3) expectations on her by her peers/society. There's also the case of women who go into esports/streaming and the discriminatory statements they face, which I'll address at a later part in my post.

When you claim peer pressure - the opinions others have and express - amounts to a barrier you seem to be suggesting that, as a barrier, peer pressure must be removed so the noble goal of having more female gamers is achieved.

No.
Let the peers hold and express the opinions they want to hold and express. Let the future female gamer learn not to award that much importance to them or just cave in, if gaming is less important to her than the opinion of her peers.
I'm not suggesting that barriers in general be removed. That was the point I made in the last section of the post you replied to. I see barriers as a natural thing formed by our interactions/expectations with others and a product of society. I just see that this barrier for females going into gaming exists. Your last sentence would be excellent, but it's too idealistic. Everyone is influenced by their peers growing up in some form and we can't expect people to just get over it. I think that we will see more females make their way into gaming once gaming becomes more popular/accepted and perceived as a hobby for everyone. I mean, we're already seeing this happening. This is a little bit of a tricky scenario, though. This can only happen if women actually want to get good at gaming and express interest. However, their interest is also influenced by the fact that gaming isn't really seen as a female hobby.

That's why I provided a precise definition of the term. Unless otherwise stated, whenever I use the term I am referring back to this definition.

Third-party opinions - peer pressure - do not qualify as a barrier.
How about this, let's go with an outside definition of social barriers from an official source. Here are a few definitions: "Social Barriers are external influences that hinder one's completion of a goal. Social barriers include opinions and actions of others that affect our daily life. An example of a social barrier could be the use of stereotypes and how they can affect the behaviors of others." "Social barriers are barriers to entry which are created by the culture of the community, i.e. people's behavior towards newcomers or others in general."

Both of them imply that barriers are not absolute and even indicate opinions of others as a barrier.
Let's say I agree with this depiction, for the sake of argument. You're still burdened with the need to present evidence that's the case, but let's set that aside.

That's a free open society operating healthily.

I think you should act in this or that manner and I am letting you know. You then freely decide how to proceed. I then freely react to your decision. And so on.

There's nothing to rectify here. That's a free open society doing its thing.
I have given you examples multiple times and done so again in this post. I agree with your last 3 sentences. This is a product of human interactions and society, in my view.

You're contradicting yourself.
Family pressure is a form of peer pressure.
You said peer pressure is not a barrier. Now family pressure is?
I can see how I was unclear so allow me to clarify. If I faced pressure from my peers to take drugs, that in itself isn't a barrier (although it seems like the online definitions may suggest otherwise). This is because my doctor or online sources may encourage me not to take drugs and so there are other avenues for me to alleviate said pressure. However, if the summation of my environmental interactions (my family, my friends, what I read online, etc.) all lead me in one direction, then that can act as a barrier. I'm less likely to perform that action. That's what I was getting at.

See, that's the problem with imprecise language. When you see the opinons of others as barriers you end up with twisted conclusions. It seems you are likely to put the blame on them, instead of owning up your decisions.

Is me not liking strawberry juice a barrier to you drinking it?
Is me telling you shouldn't dress uplike a drag queen a barrier to you dressing up however you feel like dressing up?

And I'm still waiting for evidence that shows women face reproach in impactful and statistically relevant ways in today's western societies. Do you have evidence for your claims?
To both of your questions, sort of. You alone would not really be a big influence, but if the majority of society acts a certain way then it can influence the individual and direct their actions. You seem to think I'm saying this as a "this person is at fault" or "this is horrible", when I see it as a part of society. People are influenced by their environment, some people do their own thing anyways but face resistance when doing so. Women used to be discouraged from educational pursuits, some still did it, but they were discriminated along the way. You can't just pretend everyone else exists and you can do whatever you want.

I have provided countless examples to you, I cannot show you statistically relevant studies and I'd argue that it's unreasonable to expect as much. I would need to prepare beforehand and commit time into doing so. What I present is a collation of my experiences and things I have learned from classes/reading up on things. Regardless, absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. Just because I cannot link you to a statistically proven study, it does not mean none of this exists.

This is a popular but ridiculous claim.
Praising or criticizing someone for their looks is no more objectifying than praising or criticizing someone for their IQ.
It's not.
Commenting on this or that personal charactertic does not necessarily entail the belief such person is reduceable to this or that characteristic. If I say your watch looks cheap, that doesn't mean I am objectifying you as a cheap-watch wearer.

I completely reject your assertion.
Praising or criticizing someone for their looks is very different than seeing someone as a sex toy. Saying someone is beautiful is a compliment. Saying "I'd love to have a go at _____'s ass" is sexualizing and objectifying someone. Commenting on a personal characteristic is a very broad action to go off of, that can be done in both appropriate and inappropriate ways.
I suppose they can block those individuals, no?

Again, this is the big picture: so far you have yet to present a case under which systemic barriers exist against women picking up a controller or getting into e-sports seriously.
Women are supposed to block the world? Lol. I'm referencing pressures that come from multiple avenues (family, friends, online, etc.) from multiple stages of life. I've presented many examples, as stated. If you want a detailed breakdown of research on the subject, you won't find it from a sudden debate on a gaming forum. It isn't up to me to meet what you perceive as a serious/reasonable case.

No, it isn't.
You're terribly imprecise with words.

In this context, discrimination is behaviour, typically treating someone unfairly, behaviour sourced in the belief that a certain group is inferior to another. Therefore, opinions, even outlandish absurd opinions, are not discrimination.
Straight off Wikipedia: "In human social behavior, discrimination is treatment or consideration of, or making a distinction towards, a person based on the group, class, or category to which the person is perceived to belong"

You seem to think I am confusing prejudice with discrimination. I am not. I specifically said "saying that a woman is shit..." not "believing that a woman is shit...". If you tell someone they are shit, you are treating them a certain way due to their sex. That is discrimination.

Opinions are not barriers.
I'm curious why
Yes and the limits to free speech have historically been very precise:
1. Incitement to violence.
2. Child pornography.

None of that is at stake here.
Please.
When did I say free speech is at stake? I simply stated that free speech has its limits for a reason, which you agreed with. I think some of the time you're debating with yourself lol.
you're taking your words as absolute while questioning mine. That's a strange double standard, I do not see why your definition of barriers should be correct when I am the one that initially stated that women face barriers based off my definition. Regardless, I presented to you a definition, irrespective of the both of us, placing opinions within the definition of a social barrier.
 
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