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Time Cube Redux: Space Moors, Freemasons, black means white, there was no slavery

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sangreal

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I am actually surprised you are American OP, because to me anyone who is a US citizen or otherwise lives here and identifies as American is American. I actually argue with my German girlfriend all the time because she goes on about how so and so isn't actually German or actually whatever euro nation is playing soccer right now. Her best friend grew up her entire life in Germany but has an Eritrean background so my gf does not consider her to be german.

I think this is one of the biggest differentiaters between Americans and Europeans and you disappoint me OP.

Also, you're all over this place -- this has nothing to do with referring to the US as "America"
 

Levyne

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Jun 6, 2011
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Connotation, denotation, learn them.
Both contribute to a word's meaning. I, too, took high school english.

I suppose "Awful" still means "full of awe" right? Worthy of respect or reverence. The modern negative connotations associated with the word can be ignored? Not part of the meaning.

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/awful

Well, I think this thread so far is rather awful. I'm sure you can glean which meaning.
 

Hypron

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May 9, 2012
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I am actually surprised you are American OP, because to me anyone who is a US citizen or otherwise lives here and identifies as American is American. I actually argue with my German girlfriend all the time because she goes on about how so and so isn't actually German or actually whatever euro nation is playing soccer right now. Her best friend grew up her entire life in Germany but has an Eritrean background so my gf does not consider her to be german.

I think this is one of the biggest differentiaters between Americans and Europeans and you disappoint me OP.
Not every European thinks like that though. I don't.
 

kswiston

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Mar 25, 2005
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At some point, people's family have been in a country long enough to claim that as their home country no? My mom's family migrated from France to Canada in 1702. Being here that long, they have native ancestry as well (pretty much all of the old Canadian families). Is 300 years enough time to claim your background as Canadian?

I feel like people only make an issue about this in US/Canada. I never hear people from Latin America having to justify their ancestry, even though a majority of them have at least some European or African ancestry within the last 400 years.
 
Oct 13, 2012
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Words and their meanings don't change.
Absolutely. That's why we can all still read this:

My #1 bro Chaucer said:
Whan that Aprill with his shoures soote
The droghte of March hath perced to the roote,
And bathed every veyne in swich licour
Of which vertu engendred is the flour,
Whan Zephirus eek with his sweete breeth
Inspired hath in every holt and heeth
The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne
Hath in the Ram his halve cours yronne,
And smale foweles maken melodye,
That slepen al the nyght with open ye
(so priketh hem Nature in hir corages),
Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages,
And palmeres for to seken straunge strondes,
To ferne halwes, kowthe in sondry londes;
And specially from every shires ende
Of Engelond to Caunterbury they wende,
The hooly blisful martir for to seke,
That hem hath holpen whan that they were seeke.
and why none of my English Lit books needed copious footnotes to explain the contextual drift of key words and phrases.

Both words and their meanings have proven to be incredibly elastic.
 

cobragt4001

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Sep 23, 2009
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I am actually surprised you are American OP, because to me anyone who is a US citizen or otherwise lives here and identifies as American is American. I actually argue with my German girlfriend all the time because she goes on about how so and so isn't actually German or actually whatever euro nation is playing soccer right now. Her best friend grew up her entire life in Germany but has an Eritrean background so my gf does not consider her to be german.

I think this is one of the biggest differentiaters between Americans and Europeans and you disappoint me OP.

Also, you're all over this place -- this has nothing to do with referring to the US as "America"
I am not over the place, the US itself is separate from what we call America. United States of America, just like Bank of America, a corporation doing business in America.
 

cobragt4001

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Both contribute to a word's meaning. I, too, took high school english.

I suppose "Awful" still means "full of awe" right? Worthy of respect or reverence. The modern negative connotations associated with the word can be ignored? Not part of the meaning.

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/awful

Well, I think this thread so far is rather awful. I'm sure you can glean which meaning.
You don't understand the dynamics of connotation and denotation, I see that plain and simple.
 

Vyrance

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May 19, 2010
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If you're born in America then you're automatically an American. You can by all means go by whatever nationality your parents are, but you're still an American.
 

ConfusingJazz

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Jun 30, 2004
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Oh god it's this guy again. US Citizen = American. That's the word for it in the English language.
Is that what he is arguing?

Jeebus. In English, this is the meaning people say when using the word American:

Of, from, or pertaining to the United States of America, its people or its culture.
 

Cocaloch

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Apr 16, 2013
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Words and their meanings don't change.
lulz.

If anything going with Latin definitions sure America isn't a nation, it's a state like Rome since they would both come from civitas not nationes.

I fail to see any really meaningful point you could make from arguing Latin semantics though.
 

gutter_trash

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Feb 4, 2005
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jus sanguinis nationalism is such a new thing spawned in late 19th and early 20th century.

Most kingdom back in the old days were ruled by people whose bloodlines where not even native from the country they rule in.

a certain kingdoms and empire could even spilled into multiple present day countries that include multiple different ethnicities
 

sangreal

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I am not over the place, the US itself is separate from what we call America. United States of America, just like Bank of America, a corporation doing business in America.
Sure, but that has nothing to do with your main point (that I disagree with):
Your nationality isn't based on where you're born but your pedigree, lineage and descent.
you believe your true nationality is based on your background and not whatever citizenship you possess (or your birthplace). Referring to US Citizens as "Americans" has nothing do with their ethnic background or jus sanguinis. It's simply shorthand for citizen of the United States of America. Your argument is that everyone "from" here should not be considered a United States of American; that it is abbreviated to American is inconsequential.
 

cobragt4001

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I'm not diluting your quoting.

A lot of stupid stuff gets said on the house floor.

But seriously wtf are you talking about?
So what I quoted is stupid and has no ground, got ya. The reason I quoted the Congressional Record was to reply to the gentleman or lady who mentioned freedom. Just like people express their points with memes, I express my point with what I have learned.
 

Spork4000

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Mar 29, 2013
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Where did I say it didn't happen?
You said "I believe my people were brought here," meaning that in your opinion, I am wrong and we came here willingly, if that's how it happened and we came here and worked willingly, then that's not slavery, ergo it didn't happen. So please, tell me how my ancestors actually got here.
 

Omega Ultimus

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May 10, 2014
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I get that but I posted something very specific. If what you found offends you then I apologize.
It's not offensive, it's just incredibly deceptive. You can't claim to have proof that America/USA is not a democratic-republic by posting a hyperbolic speech from one Representative that states that "This new form of government is known as a Democracy, being an established Socialist/Communist order under a new governor for America" (Speaker-Rep. James Traficant, Jr.).

Also, it's obviously just heightened metaphor in the context of the rest of the transcript.
 

cobragt4001

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Sep 23, 2009
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It's not offensive, it's just incredibly deceptive. You can't claim to have proof that America/USA is not a democratic-republic by posting a hyperbolic speech from one Representative that states that "This new form of government is known as a Democracy, being an established Socialist/Communist order under a new governor for America" (Speaker-Rep. James Traficant, Jr.).

Also, it's obviously just heightened metaphor in the context of the rest of the transcript.
When did I say I had proof of anything, I just posted a quote.
 
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