Time Cube Redux: Space Moors, Freemasons, black means white, there was no slavery

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May 29, 2013
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OP, can you make up your goddamn mind already?
If you're born in America, you're a native American. The correct term is indigenous American. The Indigenous Americans did not look like Billy Bob Thorton with a wig on lol, a lot of Indigenous Americans looked, as you would call it, black.
 

Metaphoreus

This is semantics, and nothing more
Feb 15, 2006
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Geez, maybe I shouldn't have included the link if I knew people would be so uptight about a site's opinion. We're discussing the site more than the actual quote lol
No, we're not. I'm explaining that "the actual quote" isn't what you claimed it was. A tiny fraction of what you linked to came from the Congressional Record. And it's not the fraction that you posted, and which led you to make the following comment:

Excuse me? What I posted is from Congressional Records, what are you talking about?
Instead, you posted this:

The receivers of the United States Bankruptcy are the International Bankers, via the United Nations, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. All United States Offices, Officials, and Departments are now operating within a de facto status in name only under Emergency War Powers. With the Constitutional Republican form of Government now dissolved, the receivers of the Bankruptcy have adopted a new form of government for the United States. This new form of government is known as a Democracy, being an established Socialist/Communist order under a new governor for America. This act was instituted and established by transferring and/or placing the Office of the Secretary of Treasury to that of the Governor of the International Monetary Fund. Public Law 94-564, page 8, Section H.R. 13955 reads in part: "The U.S. Secretary of Treasury receives no compensation for representing the United States?’
Which has never, in the history of the United States (which is not a corporation), ever been published in the Congressional Record.
 

Wastum

Neo Member
Mar 19, 2013
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The Netherlands
Mother was born in Spain.
Father was born in Portugal.
I was born in Brazil.

WTF am I according to OP?
Sounds a little familiar to my situation.
My father was born in the USA.
My mother was born in the Netherlands, but is from a full Indonesian family. Both her parents, as well as a few of her sisters were born in Indonesia.
As for myself, I was born and raised in The Netherlands. Go figure.
 
Sep 25, 2013
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No, we're not. I'm explaining that "the actual quote" isn't what you claimed it was. A tiny fraction of what you linked to came from the Congressional Record. And it's not the fraction that you posted, and which led you to make the following comment:



Instead, you posted this:



Which has never, in the history of the United States (which is not a corporation), ever been published in the Congressional Record.
Get out of here with your quick yet effective research of the facts!
 

Enduin

No bald cap? Lies!
Nov 29, 2006
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I still want to hear more about the Gilligan's Island: The African Chronicles, a three hour tour turned into a 300 year stay-over. Or maybe it's more like The Sierra Leone Family Robinson: The Not So Greatest Adventure Story of Them All.
 
Feb 26, 2014
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Funny this thred comes up.

Earlier today I was having this same conversation with a friend. I am currently a legal resident of the US and will be getting my citizenship soon, and he said that once I get it I become an American. I said no because I was born in the Dominican Republic, I'll just be a US citizen.

Now, he, is a US citizen, but was born and raised in Colombia for the first 8-9 years of his life until he moved to the US and he calls himself an American. I jokingly said that he is not American, but Colombia.
 
Feb 19, 2013
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Funny this thred comes up.

Earlier today I was having this same conversation with a friend. I am currently a legal resident of the US and will be getting my citizenship soon, and he said that once I get it I become an American. I said no because I was born in the Dominican Republic, I'll just be a US citizen.

Now, he, is a US citizen, but was born and raised in Colombia for the first 8-9 years of his life until he moved to the US and he calls himself an American. I jokingly said that he is not American, but Colombia.
once you get your citizenship, you're an American.

Done and done. You didn't choose to be born in the DR, but you chose to become a US citizen. Thus, you're an America.

deal with it!
 
Sep 25, 2013
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Connotation and denotation. If you're willing to accept a lie that's on you but don't diss anyone who prefers to know the true nature of a word.
See? You're doing this. You aren't making a counter argument, you aren't having a discussion, you're just saying words. This is why people think you are trolling.
 
Aug 1, 2009
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twitter.com
If you're willing to accept a lie that's on you but don't diss anyone who prefers to know the true nature of a word.
i don't know about anyone else but i'm pretty sure you're the only one "accepting a lie" in posting this thread using that glaring fabrication of anti-tax horseshit that's falsely attributed to James Traficant
 
Sep 23, 2009
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See? You're doing this. You aren't making a counter argument, you aren't having a discussion, you're just saying words. This is why people think you are trolling.
I made a simple point to his reply and that was my argument so I don't know what you're talking about. I think we're using troll too loosely here.
 
Sep 1, 2012
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i don't know about anyone else but i'm pretty sure you're the only one "accepting a lie" in posting this thread using that glaring fabrication of anti-tax horseshit that's falsely attributed to James Traficant
yes

See? You're doing this. You aren't making a counter argument, you aren't having a discussion, you're just saying words. This is why people think you are trolling.
double yes
 
Feb 26, 2014
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once you get your citizenship, you're an American.

Done and done. You didn't choose to be born in the DR, but you chose to become a US citizen. Thus, you're an America.

deal with it!
Don't get me wrong, I've grown attached to this country and consider it my home away from home. But if you ask me what I am, I will always say that I am Dominican first and foremost.

Also, I didn't choose to move to this country, my mother did, along with me and my little sister. And I thank her for that, my life has been much better compared to staying in DR.
 
Feb 22, 2012
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But wait.

Suppose one's mother nation state is Barbados.

But her ancestors were brought there as a slave from any given African nation.

Then what?
His argument lacks any type of depth. All he is hanging on right now is definitions, which he is not even using correctly or understands. It's funny to watch.
 
Sep 23, 2009
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You keep saying those words "connotation and denotation." I don't think they mean what you think they mean.
The reason I've been using the words is simply to make a point that people will use the connotative meaning of a particular word and take it as fact when in fact it does not represent the true nature of the word. In the OP, I provided the original definition of American but through decades the meaning has been reduced to mean something else which is the connotative mean, get it?
 
Dec 21, 2008
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The reason I've been using the words is simply to make a point that people will use the connotative meaning of a particular word and take it as fact when in fact it does not represent the true nature of the word. In the OP, I provided the original definition of American but through decades the meaning has been reduced to mean something else which is the connotation, get it?
Oh we got it, but you also said words don't change. You can't have it both ways to fit... whatever the hell it is you're trying to say.
 
Feb 16, 2014
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The reason I've been using the words is simply to make a point that people will use the connotative meaning of a particular word and take it as fact when in fact it does not represent the true nature of the word. In the OP, I provided the original definition of American but through decades the meaning has been reduced to mean something else which is the connotative mean, get it?
But words don't change meaning, right?
 
Feb 19, 2013
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Don't get me wrong, I've grown attached to this country and consider it my home away from home. But if you ask me what I am, I will always say that I am Dominican first and foremost.

Also, I didn't choose to move to this country, my mother did, along with me and my little sister. And I thank her for that, my life has been much better compared to staying in DR.
no, but you're choosing to become a US citizen are you not? You can always just stay a permanent resident and then consider yourself dominican.
 
Apr 23, 2011
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People will identify themselves however they wish. Either American because of their birth country, or their ancestry. It doesn't change the fact that they are citizens and American because of that citizenship.

And everyone knows that "American" refers to citizens of the USA.

You'd be putting too much effort to try and change something already established for a long time. Maybe it will change in the future, but right now, that's what it is.

You try calling Canadians Americans and Don Cherry will show up and give you a talking to about being classless.

I call myself Canadian by citizenship, but refer to my birth country as my origin.
 
Mar 13, 2011
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The reason I've been using the words is simply to make a point that people will use the connotative meaning of a particular word and take it as fact when in fact it does not represent the true nature of the word. In the OP, I provided the original definition of American but through decades the meaning has been reduced to mean something else which is the connotative mean, get it?
Allow me to repeat myself:
Let's try this:
denotation: the literal or primary meaning of a word, in contrast to the feelings or ideas that the word suggests.

connotation: an idea or feeling that a word invokes in addition to its literal or primary meaning.

An omen being bad is a connotation. A country being "an area of land that is controlled by its own government" (and of course having legitimacy on the world stage, etc.) is not a connotation.
 

Lkr

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Mar 10, 2008
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none of my family are from japan, but i know that honor and shame are a large part of the culture and my grandfather was stationed there during the korean war. can i call myself japanese?
 
Apr 16, 2007
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This is the like the 3rd topic in as many months that someone has taken great umbrage over the fact that Americans call themselves that instead of US citizens or some such nonsense. This is one of the most non-issue non-issues I've ever seen.
It's not just us referring to ourselves. People from around the world regularly refer to people from the United States as Americans, even the Brits when they're not calling us Yanks.
 
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