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University of Missouri enrollment drop of 1.5K after protests

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Frozenprince

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http://www.kmbc.com/news/mizzou-battles-enrollment-declines-following-fall-protests/39578476

The University of Missouri is facing an enrollment decline for the fall and a tougher time selling the school’s recruiting pitch to high school students.

More than 5,600 students graduated from Mizzou last weekend, but there won’t be as many students to fill classrooms this fall. The decline has led the school to close four dorms because they won’t be able to fill them.

“It’s going to take time,” admissions representative Brittany Corneillier said.

She tells prospects walking past the main administrative building, Jesse Hall, that the school is working on a lot of things since last November when many proud Tigers protested what they saw as institutional racism at the school. University System President Tim Wolfe resigned during those protests.

About that time, journalism professor Cyndi Frisby wrote a Facebook post telling the Mizzou community that people in Columbia had called her a racial slur multiple times.

“I had no idea it was going to go viral,” she said.

She said she’s moved beyond the comments, both good and bad, but she still hears many more from students on campus.

“I think students are nervous to talk about how they really feel since the protests,” she said.

Mizzou’s leaders say they’ve done plenty to provide an atmosphere to talk, including starting a series on race and interracial dialogues on campus.

Vice Provost Jim Spain also encouraged prospective students to visit the campus and talk with current students about the events.

“Interact with our students who lived through that experience at this campus, lived through it together back in November,” Spain said.

The fall’s enrollment will be the lowest in 10 years. Last fall, Mizzou had 6,200 new students. As of last week, only 4,700 incoming freshmen were signed up for the fall semester.

Spain said the protests left some people were wondering if the campus is safe. He said, without hesitation, that it is.

“It sometimes feels uncomfortable. We’re working to make it feel comfortable and inclusive and supportive,” Spain said.

Can't say I'm either surprised or saddened at this news.

Edit: Found a better article.
 

suberzat

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Aug 19, 2012
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If I go there to get my masters in food science would I be wrong? Feel like they need students now.
 

hokahey

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Living in the area, my bet is attendance dropped because many middle class whites have been soured by the goings on there.
 

Cinders

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Living in the area, my bet is attendance dropped because many middle class whites have been soured by the goings on there.

I work at MU, and my impression is largely the same.

They've also enacted a hiring freeze and have been laying off staff, mostly low-skill workers like janitors and maintenance. So, at least in the short term, the whole debacle has hurt minorities a lot more than it helped them.
 

freeofgreed

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Mar 7, 2013
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I work at MU, and my impression is largely the same.

They've also enacted a hiring freeze and have been laying off staff, mostly low-skill workers like janitors and maintenance. So, at least in the short term, the whole debacle has hurt minorities a lot more than it helped them.

How?
 

freeofgreed

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I think he's saying the low-skill workers are predominantly minorities?

I can see that angle, but the point of the protests had nothing to do with getting low skilled workers jobs, it was about shedding light on racism on their campus. Two seperate issues.
 

norm9

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Not surprised prospective students don't want to deal with the drama. School is stressful enough.
 

Slayven

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The point the article tries to make. Hey let the blacks suffer because to do otherwise might cost us some money. money over minorties is the unwritten catchphrase of America.

Some times doing the right thing hurts in the shortterm, but will be better in the longterm.

I bet they won't let that bullshit slide again.
 

Cinders

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I can see that angle, but the point of the protests had nothing to do with getting low skilled workers jobs, it was about shedding light on racism on their campus. Two seperate issues.

I understand this, but one of the demands Concerned Student 1950 made to combat racism on campus was to increase employment of minorities. At this point, this will not happen anytime soon.

I had problems with both sides of the debate (the protesters and the administration), but I do not want to go into that right now. I just wanted to point out one way the situation was and continues to be complex and difficult to resolve.

The point the article tries to make. Hey let the blacks suffer because to do otherwise might cost us some money. money over minorties is the unwritten catchphrase of America.

Some times doing the right thing hurts in the shortterm, but will be better in the longterm.

I bet they won't let that bullshit slide again.

Completely agree. I hope we see improvement once the university gets back on track financially.
 

Frozenprince

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Sep 26, 2013
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If a non-Murdoch Rag picks it up I'll edit the OP.

In the meantime just kinda... ignore the point of the article and take away that they lost because they chose inaction over qualitative change.

The free market spoke to them, and it said "No, change your shit or we'll go elsewhere".
 

freeofgreed

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Definitely not. But I'd guess most students aren't trying to spend their time protesting instead of studying.

Yes but plenty of them did. and you can't generalize all of the ones who were protesting based off of what Melissa Click did.
 

commedieu

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Jan 10, 2009
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What does that have to do with his point?

His point is that people don't want to deal with the effects of racism. That is what OP is about. I'm having a hard time figuring out how racism doesn't have to do with his point. I said dealing with the issue of racism is such a drag for some.

And I'll add, it must be nice.
 

norm9

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Yes but plenty of them did. and you can't generalize all of the ones who were protesting based off of what Melissa Click did.

If you're a prospective student, a campus that has all these protests and a psychotic teacher will factor in whether someone wants to go there.
 

Frozenprince

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At this point the university faces a real choice.

Show significant change and market that, really lead the way for campus reform nationally and rebuild themselves.

Or turtle up even more and die a slow death.
 

Slo

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His point is that people don't want to deal with the effects of racism. That is what OP is about. I'm having a hard time figuring out how racism doesn't have to do with his point. I said dealing with the issue of racism is such a drag for some.

Pretty easy to understand why someone would choose a low drama situation over a high drama one, given the choice. If you won't acknowledge that even that....

And I'll add, it must be nice.

I have no idea what this part means.
 

devilhawk

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I've followed this more closely than most here, being that I despise most things concerning that school.

They've come out and said that the drop in students is pretty mixed in demographics. The incident has shed light on the racism that pervades the school, so students rightfully do not want to go to a school that has those issues. Also, prospective students and their parents see the protests and environment as distracting from learning. Which it absolutely is.

If your classes are being canceled, you are not learning. If your teacher is fired because she attempted to recruit muscle and assault a student, you aren't learning. If you are afraid of being accosted because you went to class instead of the protest, you are not learning, If the football team has the authority to make policy and system-wide administrative decisions, what are you really learning?

MU may very well be better off after these protests and reforms to institutions and changes to mindsets. As a prospective student, why not just go to a school that you believe is already better? No matter your race, why knowingly put yourself into that situation when you are paying tens and tens of thousands of dollars to learn?
 

freeofgreed

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If you're a prospective student, a campus that has all these protests and a psychotic teacher will factor in whether someone wants to go there.

I'm pretty sure she was fired, and yeah of course all the protests would make students second guess going there. I don't think anyone is arguing against that.
 

jaekeem

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Feb 1, 2016
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Is this really a surprise?

You can call it selfish, but I don't blame the average student for wanting to focus on their education, rather than attend at a tumultuous environment. Especially when you consider how much college debt is nowadays.
 

cameron

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If a non-Murdoch Rag picks it up I'll edit the OP.
ABC-affiliate, KMBC: "Mizzou battles enrollment declines following fall protests"
COLUMBIA, Mo. —The University of Missouri is facing an enrollment decline for the fall and a tougher time selling the school’s recruiting pitch to high school students.

More than 5,600 students graduated from Mizzou last weekend, but there won’t be as many students to fill classrooms this fall. The decline has led the school to close four dorms because they won’t be able to fill them.
The fall’s enrollment will be the lowest in 10 years. Last fall, Mizzou had 6,200 new students. As of last week, only 4,700 incoming freshmen were signed up for the fall semester.

From January, ABC 17: "ABC 17 News confirms fewer people applying to MU for next fall"
Here's a breakdown of what demographics saw decreases in applications:
  • High ability (ACT of 30 or higher) decreased by 7.7%
  • African American applications decreased by 78 from last year, a 19% decrease
  • Hispanic applications down by 1
  • Transfer students decreased by 94 applications since last year
  • International applications decreased by 6
  • Graduate applications decreased by 19% and decreased 552 compared to 2 years ago
  • Non-Missouri resident applications decreased by 948 and non-resident deposits dropped by 25% since last year
  • Illinois applications have decreased by 7%, and deposits decreased by 31%
Missouri resident applications increased by 21, but deposits have decreased by almost 10%.

Texas applications have also increased by 5.2% compared to last year.
 

commedieu

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Pretty easy to understand why someone would choose a low drama situation over a high drama one, given the choice. If you won't acknowledge that even that....



I have no idea what this part means.

It means it must be pleasant to have the choice available to deal with the realities of racism.

I've already acknowledged its a drag to deal with people protesting racism.
 

Mediking

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I live in Missouri and Webster University is the far better college than the University of Missouri. Webster University is better for so many dang reasons.
 

Japanmanx3

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Aug 28, 2013
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I've followed this more closely than most here, being that I despise most things concerning that school.

They've come out and said that the drop in students is pretty mixed in demographics. The incident has shed light on the racism that pervades the school, so students rightfully do not want to go to a school that has those issues. Also, prospective students and their parents see the protests and environment as distracting from learning. Which it absolutely is.

If your classes are being canceled, you are not learning. If your teacher is fired because she attempted to recruit muscle and assault a student, you aren't learning. If you are afraid of being accosted because you went to class instead of the protest, you are not learning, If the football team has the authority to make policy and system-wide administrative decisions, what are you really learning?

MU may very well be better off after these protests and reforms to institutions and changes to mindsets. As a prospective student, why not just go to a school that you believe is already better? No matter your race, why knowingly put yourself into that situation when you are paying tens and tens of thousands of dollars to learn?
Whoa! Links?
 

Team Alucard

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Oct 23, 2014
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I live in Missouri and Webster University is the far better college than the University of Missouri. Webster University is better for so many dang reasons.

$26,000 a year in tuition though.

EDIT: and just by glancing at college scorecard it seems to compare relatively poorly in other aspects.

 

Madness

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What will really kill them is the out of state student drops. Not only do they pay much higher fees, but out of state students usually take their educations elsewhere as alumni and increase the prestige of the school.

It isn't really surprising. I bet a lot of middle class white people don't want to go to school there anymore nor do I think a lot of people of colour want to go to school there. Exacerbated by the fact they had hired morons like that media professor who wanted students to manhandle a student journalist.
 

Guevara

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Jul 27, 2009
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Is this really a surprise?

You can call it selfish, but I don't blame the average student for wanting to focus on their education, rather than attend at a tumultuous environment. Especially when you consider how much college debt is nowadays.

Seriously. College is becoming purely a business decision.

But still: if you have options, why would you agree to walk into all that drama?
 

entremet

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Dec 6, 2008
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I've followed this more closely than most here, being that I despise most things concerning that school.

They've come out and said that the drop in students is pretty mixed in demographics. The incident has shed light on the racism that pervades the school, so students rightfully do not want to go to a school that has those issues. Also, prospective students and their parents see the protests and environment as distracting from learning. Which it absolutely is.

If your classes are being canceled, you are not learning. If your teacher is fired because she attempted to recruit muscle and assault a student, you aren't learning. If you are afraid of being accosted because you went to class instead of the protest, you are not learning, If the football team has the authority to make policy and system-wide administrative decisions, what are you really learning?

MU may very well be better off after these protests and reforms to institutions and changes to mindsets. As a prospective student, why not just go to a school that you believe is already better? No matter your race, why knowingly put yourself into that situation when you are paying tens and tens of thousands of dollars to learn?

Basically. Not surprising.
 
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