Verizon 5G is coming. Predictions?

#1
From The Verge- https://www.theverge.com/2018/9/11/...band-internet-service-installations-october-1

Verizon’s 5G broadband internet service will go live later this fall, with installations starting on October 1st in Houston, Indianapolis, Los Angeles, and Sacramento, the company announced today. This marks the first 5G commercial service to launch in the US, and it sees Verizon make good on its promise to do so in November 2017. Verizon is calling it simply 5G Home.
As for pricing and availability goes, Verizon says customers in those select metro areas can sign up for it starting on September 13th, so long as their address in a supported ZIP code. It will cost $50 a month for existing Verizon Wireless customers, and $70 for non-Verizon customers. If you’re one of the first members to sign up for the service, Verizon will sweeten the deal with free installation, three months of complimentary service, a free Chromecast or Apple TV 4K, and three months of free YouTube TV.
The future of internet speed is coming and it comes with a hefty $70 a month fee for not-current customers. I'm going to go with a not so bold prediction there will be a hard data cap; I think they'll be greedy and make it 100 GBs. As is, "unlimited" 4G on verizon is capped at 15 GB before you get switched to dialup speeds.

As a person with no internet at home, I might finally sign up and test out the speeds. The switch from 3g to 4g on phones was a revolution from what I remember.

Throttle me if old.
 
#2
Would be cool if this could bypass the monopoly Comast has in my area. Got no choices other than them so I am stuck with them unless I move out and that's not going to be happening. But I also hate bandwidth caps and I want good upload/download speed.. And it would have to work with my wifi mesh system.
 

RubxQub

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#3
I need to see some real world examples of 5G before I believe in how disruptive it can possibly be to traditional ISPs.

By it’s nature, 5G is awful at penetrating buildings...so I’m having a hard time accepting 5G as the next coming as far as being a primary home internet replacement unless we start putting 5G receivers on top of our houses (like satellite dishes) to then pipe WiFi into the home.
 
#4
By it’s nature, 5G is awful at penetrating buildings...so I’m having a hard time accepting 5G as the next coming as far as being a primary home internet replacement unless we start putting 5G receivers on top of our houses (like satellite dishes) to then pipe WiFi into the home.
A few years ago, I almost signed up for Clear Internet, which gave you a mini receiver that taped near a window so it could "see" signals more clearly. Reviews were pretty bad for it so I didn't test it out. Ended up hotspotting as a temporary bandaid that became my permanent solution; until unlimited no longer became unlimited because I got flagged as a "power user."

I wonder if 5G is going to work the same way. The press release mentions they've been putting in the groundwork for a while, so I'm crossing my fingers it works as advertised, though wouldn't be surprised if it's all just for buys.
 
#5
Hopefully it's more feasible for rural areas than SAT internet currently is, and hopefully it doesn't cost an arm and a leg. Adoption rate might be small at first, because people aren't going to purhcase untested technology on a large scale until ideas of it's efficacy start rolling through.

Problems I see are stated above, 5G being at too high of a freq to penetrate homes easily, Comcast and such will most likely fight tooth and nail if it has the capability of usurping their position, retrofitting all the towers will take a while as well, and will probably need more towers in general to fight attenuation.
 
#7
Hopefully it's more feasible for rural areas than SAT internet currently is, and hopefully it doesn't cost an arm and a leg. Adoption rate might be small at first, because people aren't going to purhcase untested technology on a large scale until ideas of it's efficacy start rolling through.

Problems I see are stated above, 5G being at too high of a freq to penetrate homes easily, Comcast and such will most likely fight tooth and nail if it has the capability of usurping their position, retrofitting all the towers will take a while as well, and will probably need more towers in general to fight attenuation.
With the limited research I've done, I think 5G is really going to hurt internet penetration into rural areas big time. 5G towers (or boxes if you will) basically need to be placed every 100 yds or so in order to carry the signal, as opposed to 4G which only has to have a tower every few miles.

At best, 5G adoption will help rural areas by freeing up bandwidth on the current 4G network. As more urban people hop on the 5G network, the existing 4G users should see a bump in performance. That's the best us rural folks can hope for at this point I think.

Satellite is getting better, but it trash for gaming due to poor upload speeds and ping. Line of Site is better, and sometimes better than the big ISP's.

I'm on a Line of Site internet, with about
5-10 mbps down. I've got friends who've got fiber with 1gbps down. Most times their ping is between 40-85. Mine hovers between 3-12. The only advantage they have is downloading updates.
 
#9
The more competition, the better. All we have is Comcast (which I'm still thankful for) but I'd like to move on from them.
Most rural areas don't even have Comcast. Rural areas typically don't have enough homes to make it worthwhile to build out infrastructure.

Right now rural areas can go one of two routes. Satellite or Line of Site. Both have their issues. The only other option is something like 4G. Many rural homes just use their phone as a hotspot, seeing as it's the often better than the other two options.

5G will not be available in rural areas. How is that creating competition?
 
#13
It is a proprietary version of 5G. Not the standard that is coming. Verizon may be big enough to get away with it, though not sure if it is a good thing long term for them
 
#15
5G will not be available in rural areas. How is that creating competition?
I'm just being hopeful and positive. Even if rural areas don't see a benefit right away, we are fortunate to at least have some sort of internet. It might not be 1gbps but it's better than non-existent.
 
#16
I need to see some real world examples of 5G before I believe in how disruptive it can possibly be to traditional ISPs.

By it’s nature, 5G is awful at penetrating buildings...so I’m having a hard time accepting 5G as the next coming as far as being a primary home internet replacement unless we start putting 5G receivers on top of our houses (like satellite dishes) to then pipe WiFi into the home.
Honestly, it probably will get to the point where each block or even large building would have their own "tower."

This sounds pricey, but compared to building out fiber to every building a la FIOS, its quite a bargain. Plus 5G can support a significantly larger number of connections - I think the number they are throwing around is like a million per squake kilometer.
 
#20
I game a lot, and transfer some big damn files. If it has super low latency (comparable with cable)I'll switch in a heartbeat.

What's maddening is that I have comcast, get 130 down, 12 up,(just brutal for me) but with horrible customer service(I purchased my own modem and every three months a new modem rental charge would appear and I would have to go thru an entire process to prove to them it was my own modem)and less then 3 miles away fiber is offered for almost HALF THE PRICE.

I am slowly losing my mind.(there are 7 competitors in my area, but all of them have less then half the speed, or are dial up)So any new competitor would get a good look from me.

I am wary of wifi though. Everything in my house has a hard line, save for my ceiling TV.
 
#21
If its wimax style like we have in London with relish then I hope it's better for you guys as my friends connection would drop and reconnect randomly taking upto 40 seconds, this was early last year.
 
#22
I read some stuff on 5G maybe a year ago saying that apparently it may as well be called 10G because it'll be that much faster than 4G. Fast to the point where it could mean a new age of wireless connectivity and became the standard way we receive internet, and all without wires. Sounds cool if true.
 
#23
I am always amazed when i see US prices for internet, especially mobile one.

I am paying currently 13,5$ for about 20GB on 4G in poland (i could change to around 20$ for 100Gb) and about the same for 30Mbit/s without any GB limit in my home...
 
#24
I am always amazed when i see US prices for internet, especially mobile one.

I am paying currently 13,5$ for about 20GB on 4G in poland (i could change to around 20$ for 100Gb) and about the same for 30Mbit/s without any GB limit in my home...
Last time i was in Poland i bought a promotion thru Play. 100gb for 1pln or 10pln. it was amazing. In the US i pay $30 for 1 gig. i don't really care about the data but the quality of the connection. In Poland I had amazing LTE in the middle of a farm field in the middle of nowhere somehow, and the speeds everywhere in the city were amazing as well.
 
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#26
It would be good if 5g phones can use the extremely low latency for wirelessly connecting to pcs with an add-on receiver, to function as VR headsets.
 
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