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What are you reading? End of summer edition.

Dan

No longer boycotting the Wolfenstein franchise


Not really a gripping read, but it gets the job done I guess. I was hoping for something more in the moment, like Helter Skelter, but maybe that just wouldn't work for this. Can't seem to read more than 20 pages at a time.
 

coldvein

Banned
just started a big fat book called QUICKSILVER by .. Neal Stephenson? Bit of a slow start but I'm digging it alright.
 
The Private Life of Chairman Mao

I've read this book perhaps a half dozen times. Times are tight and I got to save money. So I'm re-reading a lot of my books. They're all good reads.
 

Dan

No longer boycotting the Wolfenstein franchise
The Experiment said:
I've read this book perhaps a half dozen times. Times are tight and I got to save money. So I'm re-reading a lot of my books. They're all good reads.
You don't have a library to go to?
 

Nameless

Member


Desperately needed something to read, stopped at the grocery store and after 5mins of looking(close to being late for work) I spotted the named Stephen King and bought the book without even reading the description.

Pretty boring so far, but hopefully it picks up.
 
I just got done reading "Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows" last week.


I think I'll move onto the next books called "A Song of Fire and Ice" series. (<----How many books are already written?)



Are there anymore 7 parts series that's seems good to me that i might check it out?
 

Dan

No longer boycotting the Wolfenstein franchise
I know after the quake wasn't among the recommended Haruki Murakami books mentioned in past threads, but I read that one before my current read. Can't say I was very fond of it. Seemed superficially pretentious... or pretentiously superficial... or something. Like Garden State or other similar indie movies. Any chance I'd still like his novels?
 

AstroLad

Hail to the KING baby

Lessig's update. Still a very interesting work, but I do wish it went heavier on the law and lighter on the tech in v2 rather than the other way around.


Smith is one of the most entertaining travel writers around, especially if you have an interest in air travel (duh, I suppose). Mostly updated columns but still a fun breeze.
 

Eric P

Member
Jake. said:
amrita by banana yoshimoto. is taking forever cause i'm lazy and too tired all the time.
i read another book by her a long time ago and quite liked it.

i'm currently reading like 4 things

ian banks - the wasp factory
american gothic - 60 years of american horror cinema (EXCELLENT READ)
absolute sandman vol 1
michael dibdin - vendetta
 

cicero

Member
The Experiment said:
The Private Life of Chairman Mao

I've read this book perhaps a half dozen times. Times are tight and I got to save money. So I'm re-reading a lot of my books. They're all good reads.
I bought and read that about 8 years ago. Have you read Mao: The Unknown Story by Jung Chang and Jon Halliday?
 

coldvein

Banned
Jade Knight 08 said:
I think I'll move onto the next books called "A Song of Fire and Ice" series. (<----How many books are already written?)

I think there are four right now. game of thrones, clash of kings, storm of swords, feast for crows. you're lucky to be reading it for the first time, i am envious. i'm on my 4th readthrough at the moment, waiting for the next book.. : (
 
coldvein said:
I think there are four right now. game of thrones, clash of kings, storm of swords, feast for crows. you're lucky to be reading it for the first time, i am envious. i'm on my 4th readthrough at the moment, waiting for the next book.. : (

I didn't read Feast for Crows because I am now convinced GRRM will be dead before these books are finished. I'll read the rest of the series if he manages to release them all. The wait after Storm of Swords was too long and bitter.
 

AntoneM

Member
Civil Procedure: Cases, Material and Questions
Property
Studies in Contract Law
Criminal Law
Legal Research and Writing
Torts

who has time to read for pleasure???
 

QVT

Fair-weather, with pride!
The rest of my summer looks like it'll be going like this:

Don Quixote new translation
Book 3 of Book of the New Sun by Gene Wolfe
Mary by Vladimir Nabokov
Book 4 of Book of the New Sun by Gene Wolfe
Fathers and Sons by Tugenev
Urth of the New Sun by Gene Wolfe

and that'll be September. only 6 books :( Sucks that school is starting up again.
 

FnordChan

Member
I started reading Jim Butcher's Dresden Files series at the beginning of the summer and have been steadily working my way through 'em ever since. I'm currently on book six, Blood Rites, and thoroughly enjoying myself. The hook, for anyone who doesn't know: Harry Dresden is a wizard working openly in Chicago as a detective - he's in the Yellow Pages under "W" - who deals with all manner of supernatural shit. They're a bit fluffy but enjoyable and the characters have been developing nicely as the series progresses.

Once I've finished up the series I'll be getting back to Martin Cruz Smith's Polar Star, the sequel to Gorky Park.

FnordChan, a sucker for serial fiction
 

calder

Member

I've never read any of his books before, but I picked it up on a whim. I'm normally particular about the scifi I read (while being a pretty indiscriminate fantasy whore) but it grabbed me very quickly. After a bit I was worried I was missing out not having read his earlier books but a few googled reviews seemed to indicate this book happened before the others set in Reynolds persistent universe so I'm sticking with it.

Next up:


Wish it was a Takeshi Kovacs novel, but it sounds like pretty much the same thing just without everyone's favourite uber-bitter, cynical former Envoy. Looking forward to it.


Oh and I finished Red Seas Under Red Skies by Scott Lynch and freaking LOVED it. So much so that I reread The Lies of Locke Lamora immediately after. Such a great start to a new series.
 

Bildi

Member


I never got through this book the last couple of times but this time I'm going to make it.

It's about the theory that the gods were flesh and blood. In particular, his theory is that the gods lived for a long time (like hundreds of thousands of years) which was preserved by marrying sisters etc... and that initially humans had a similar lifespan but it has been reduced to our current lifespan by dilution / deliberate genetic manipulation.

I like reading these kinds of theoretical works and this isn't the best-written one I've ever read, but it's an interesting theory.

After that will be something a bit lighter:



As in, sequel to Ring.
 

SyNapSe

Member
Nameless said:


Desperately needed something to read, stopped at the grocery store and after 5mins of looking(close to being late for work) I spotted the named Stephen King and bought the book without even reading the description.

Pretty boring so far, but hopefully it picks up.

Like a lot of King's recent work that book didn't appeal to me, but if you have the time give Cell a try. I found it very enjoyable! It probably came out less than 4 years ago max.. should be easy to find in paperback.
 

Costanza

Banned


Sorta boring and just not really digging it around the 100 page mark.

I'm not sure if I'm gonna stick with this one.
 

drohne

hyperbolically metafictive
rereading the brothers karamazov. i was thinking of it for reasons it'd be pointless to into. i don't really like dostoevsky -- so often his novels seem like disembodied voices railing at each other. but he has his moments. and i just got through the whole grand inquisitor bit today, which is amazing
 

oatmeal

Banned
I just finished off my brothers fantasy trilogy "The Inlands", and then moved onto The Langoliers by Stephen King.

I didn't want to read the other three shorts, so I am now working on IT.

Something I've been meaning to read for years.

Best hardcover art ever:

 

coldvein

Banned
I saw this new hardcover william gibson book at barnes + noble the other day, Spooks Country or something.. Anybody read it?
 

Dan

No longer boycotting the Wolfenstein franchise
coldvein said:
I saw this new hardcover william gibson book at barnes + noble the other day, Spooks Country or something.. Anybody read it?
Ooh, I forgot that came out this month. It's called Spook Country.

I do know that it takes place in the same universe as Pattern Recognition and some characters from that one flit in and out, like his previous trilogies.
 

Guy

Member
I haven't read a book since maybe may, so I need suggestions of book to get back into reading. I don't have a specific theme, just something interesting will do.
 

thomaser

Member


The Interpretation of Dreams by Sigmund Freud. I read it for fun because I often remember my dreams in detail, and halfway through it's been very interesting.



Hopscotch by Julio Cortazar. Cocky and funny. And just a bit confusing.

Other than that, I'm filing away on the complete works of Shakespeare, trying to get up the resolve to read all the sonnets. The last book I finished was Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy, which was wonderful. Nobody makes believable and engaging characters like Tolstoy - it feels like his books are populated with real people, compared to cardboard cut-outs in most other books.
 

Piecake

Member
thomaser said:


The Interpretation of Dreams by Sigmund Freud. I read it for fun because I often remember my dreams in detail, and halfway through it's been very interesting.



Hopscotch by Julio Cortazar. Cocky and funny. And just a bit confusing.

Other than that, I'm filing away on the complete works of Shakespeare, trying to get up the resolve to read all the sonnets. The last book I finished was Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy, which was wonderful. Nobody makes believable and engaging characters like Tolstoy - it feels like his books are populated with real people, compared to cardboard cut-outs in most other books.

Have you read any other work by Cortazar? I'm curious since Ive read Hopscotch and loved it and was wondering what book of his to read next.
 

cicero

Member
Kolyma Tales by Varlam Shalamov



The Anti-Federalist: An Abridgment of The Complete Anti-Federalist by Herbert J. Storing



The Gun Digest Book of Combat Handgunnery by Massad F. Ayoob



Hope to have the UK editions of A History of the Crusades Vol. 1-3 by Steven Runciman, and Talleyrand: Betrayer and Saviour of France by Robin Harris soon.
 

thomaser

Member
Gonaria said:
Have you read any other work by Cortazar? I'm curious since Ive read Hopscotch and loved it and was wondering what book of his to read next.

No, this is my first. White Man seems to be the authority on Cortazar around here.
 

Mifune

Mehmber
Dan said:
I know after the quake wasn't among the recommended Haruki Murakami books mentioned in past threads, but I read that one before my current read. Can't say I was very fond of it. Seemed superficially pretentious... or pretentiously superficial... or something. Like Garden State or other similar indie movies. Any chance I'd still like his novels?

I wouldn't use his short stories as a basis to judge his writing as a whole. Just read Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World. It's sorta cyberpunk, sorta existential detective story, sorta fantasy, all brilliant.

Or, since you're reading a book about Aum, try his book about Aum. It's called Underground, and it's maybe the most devastating piece of nonfiction I've ever read.

I'm reading this...


Initially a little disappointed to wait six years for the guy's new novel and it turns out to be a straightforward detective yarn. And then it got its hooks in me. Great characters and setting. And Chabon's writing, oh god his writing.
 

Dan

No longer boycotting the Wolfenstein franchise
Mifune said:
I wouldn't use his short stories as a basis to judge his writing as a whole. Just read Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World. It's sorta cyberpunk, sorta existential detective story, sorta fantasy, all brilliant.
Okay, this one does sound interesting and perhaps more my speed. I'll give that a read in the near future.

Or, since you're reading a book about Aum, try his book about Aum. It's called Underground, and it's maybe the most devastating piece of nonfiction I've ever read.
Interesting. I'll check that out after I finish the other Aum book. Thanks.
 

Octagon

Member
I'm currently reading part one of the Kingpriest triology
and Bill Brysons autobiography (title?).
The Bill Bryson book doesn't appeal to me like the rest of his books but
hopefully it will get better.
 
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