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WHAT ARE YOU READING? NOVEMBER

Rayo

Banned
 

Alucard

Banned


I've been reading this for the past 3 months. I'm over midway through, and I've been enjoying it immensely, but I've just been chipping away at it.
 

Fuzzery

Member
Alucard said:


I've been reading this for the past 3 months. I'm over midway through, and I've been enjoying it immensely, but I've just been chipping away at it.

Same deal, it's great in pieces. While the book itself is pretty amazing, for some reason i'm just not compelled to read it in one go.
 

BlueTsunami

there is joy in sucking dick
I finished reading Philip K. Dick's Ubik (Started at the end of October). In October I read "The Man in the High Tower", "The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch", "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep" and "Ubik" (all part of the Philip K. Dick Hardcover release from the "Books of America" series (I think its called)

Currently I picked up the first book in the Dark Tower series (Gunslinger). I haven't made it past the Introduction yet, I was so tired yesterday ;_;. Don't really like thinking beyond a book (as far as what I want to read) but I'm thinking about getting the Hardcover release (from the same company who produced the ones I read from PKD) of H.P Lovecraft.
 

Flambe

Member
The Bonehunters - Steven Erikson.

I'm sad that I'm catching up to the latest and will have to start waiting for this awesome series to continue =p Going to have to find a different series to start soon bleh
 

Pikelet

Member
Currently I picked up the first book in the Dark Tower series (Gunslinger).
Be warned, the first book is nothing like the rest. I didnt really start to like the series until about the end of book 2 but 'Wizard And Glass' is amazing
 

FnordChan

Member
I just finished F. Paul Wilson's The Tomb and dug it quite a bit. Time to backtrack and read The Keep, which I believe kicked off The Adversary Cycle. Meanwhile, needing a paperback to read today I grabbed the used copy of Laurel K. Hamilton's Guilty Pleasures off the shelf that I'd been meaning to check out for all my vampire romance. Yes, I realize this reduces my credibility when recommending anything whatsoever to GAF, but I'm a sucker for this sort of thing. As it were.

FnordChan
 

Eric P

Member
FnordChan said:
I just finished F. Paul Wilson's The Tomb and dug it quite a bit. Time to backtrack and read The Keep, which I believe kicked off The Adversary Cycle. Meanwhile, needing a paperback to read today I grabbed the used copy of Laurel K. Hamilton's Guilty Pleasures off the shelf that I'd been meaning to check out for all my vampire romance. Yes, I realize this reduces my credibility when recommending anything whatsoever to GAF, but I'm a sucker for this sort of thing. As it were.

FnordChan

The Keep isn't REALLY needed for the whole Repairman Jack series, but it's good background to have, esp around book 4 or 5 when he really starts directly tying stuff together. Check out The Barrens and Others short story collection for another Repairman Jack story and some unrelated neat bits, like Pelts and Barrens, which is nearly lovecraftian in its story devices.

Since he's a medical doctor, he does some neat medical fiction. Check out sims, which about a group of genetically created simian slaves who want rights and protections. It's a neat novel expanded from a novella. the novel gives the concept room to breathe in thought and execution even if the plot and resolution is a bit...um, standard.
 

FnordChan

Member
Eric P said:
The Keep isn't REALLY needed for the whole Repairman Jack series, but it's good background to have, esp around book 4 or 5 when he really starts directly tying stuff together.

In that case, I'll continue with Jack for a bit before back tracking and checking out The Keep. I'm planning on picking up Legacies before heading home for Thanksgiving.

FnordChan
 

Cdammen

Member
I'm reading The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories, a compilation of a some of H.P. Lovecraft's best short stories. The tales are not really scary, but they make me feel uneasy and the writing is excellent... although a little too complex (as in old) for me (I'm a Swede).



I love short stories, because I'd rather have concentrated doses of brilliant writing than drawn out epic tales that linger on long past their climax. Next up I'll be buying and reading The Best American Short Stories (2007 edition).
 

BlueTsunami

there is joy in sucking dick
If your getting into Lovecraft, I really recommend the Library of America books (as I stated before). Heres a link...

H. P. Lovecraft: Tales (Library of America) (Hardcover): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1931082723/?tag=neogaf0e-20

The book is really high quality and Amazon is selling it for $23 (before shipping). Whats in it?

Amazon said:
has selected 22 works of fiction, ranging from such traditional ghostly tales as "The Outsider" and "The Rats in the Walls" to such lengthy cosmic narratives as "The Call of Cthulhu" and "At the Mountains of Madness."

The pages, I believe, have anti-acidic properties or something, one of those built in string bookmarks and a nice blue hardcover. I'm probably going to buy it even though I want to finish the Darktower series all at once.

Pikelet said:
Be warned, the first book is nothing like the rest. I didnt really start to like the series until about the end of book 2 but 'Wizard And Glass' is amazing

I'm actually liking what I'm reading in Gunslinger. I was surprised, reading the Foward how it was actually written back in 1970? And the series finally finishing up around 2003? Wow

I really like how King was able to meld the whole Wild West, Fantasy, Horror genre together. It also feels really, really grandiose. I hope it can keep that feeling throughout.
 

Uncle

Member
A friend brought me a book called From Finland With Love by Roman Schatz. It's a collection of satirical columns about Finland written by a German-born tv-producer who came to Finland in 1986. It was pretty good. Not laugh out loud funny, but very entertaining. It's only about 130 pages long with a couple of illustrations, but as a nice plus it has the columns in Finnish and in English, as it's supposed to be entertain both foreigners living here as well as "Finns with robust self-esteem and a healthy sense of self-irony". If there are any here, I recommend reading it.
 

Eric P

Member
Uncle said:
A friend brought me a book called From Finland With Love by Roman Schatz. It's a collection of satirical columns about Finland written by a German-born tv-producer who came to Finland in 1986. It was pretty good. Not laugh out loud funny, but very entertaining. It's only about 130 pages long with a couple of illustrations, but as a nice plus it has the columns in Finnish and in English, as it's supposed to be entertain both foreigners living here as well as "Finns with robust self-esteem and a healthy sense of self-irony". If there are any here, I recommend reading it.

that actually does sound interesting

therte's an american Don Maloney who did the same thing for Japan in the late 70s early 80s which i loved.

edit: aw man. i googled him to see what's up and he just died two months ago. lived to be 89.

http://www.heraldtribune.com/article/20070907/NEWS/709070411

hell of a funny guy.
 

Eric P

Member


taking a break from Blood Meridian

George Orwell's most important and lasting newspaper journalism is to be found in the columns he wrote for the left-wing weekly Tribune during the mid-1940s. A reviewer from 1940, he became the paper's literary editor in 1943, and in the next thirteen months wrote fifty-nine weekly pieces under the rubric 'As I Please'. He left to work briefly for the Observer as a war correspondent, but returned to London shortly after the tragic death of his wife Eileen and in autumn 1945 resumed his Tribune column, writing weekly opinion pieces in 1945-6 and a further twenty-one instalments of 'As I Please' in 1946-7.

Orwell's columns - written while he was working on his two greatest novels, Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four - have never before been collected in a single volume. This book, published to coincide with Tribune's seventieth anniversary, shows Orwell at the height of his powers as a writer - as his biographer, Bernard Crick, put it, 'the Doctor Johnson of the left'.
 

sefskillz

shitting in the alley outside your window
Ford Prefect said:


Saw this at the library :lol

Actually pretty funny.
norton is fn hilarious. hbo just put a dvd out of his standup, great stuff. check it out if you get a chance
 

Mifune

Mehmber
Jonathan Lethem's The Fortress of Solitude.

Just finished up Blindness by Jose Saramago. Holy fuck what a great book. Was not an easy or especially pleasant read, however.
 
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