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Why are black people so universally hated?

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Lebron

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Because they're just like females, they want every single benefit but none of the responsability.
When white people, say, "hey, black guy", it's like the worse thing ever. But when black people say "hey, white guy." It's not a big deal.
Or that attitude that black people have of always playing the victim role. Oh, he discriminated me because I'm black, not because I just can't afford this, or because my security level isn't enough to pass through that door. No, it has to be because I'm black.

And no, I don't really care about skin color, in my family we have diversity and we don't really care about such issues. Sometimes I call my relatives "hey, blackie" (it doesn't 'sounds' nice in english, but whatever) and they don't flip their shit or anything. And of course, sometimes they call me Gasper, or whatever.

Maybe it's because the culture, that we aren't too oversensitive with the issue. I don't know. But I do know why people usually hate on most black people, and sometimes they're right. Sorry if this is not popular or anything, but that's how it is here.
Good, gooooood.


Let the hate flow through you. I need to get to level 30 already, damn it.


edit:

Just dinged to level 30. Thanks for playing.
 

Mista K

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I have a friend that was stationed around DC for 4 years, and came back a racist. He told me how every time a car was being stolen there, it was a black guy. And how confrontational they could be with very little English skills. There was also an African American man in his platoon (as in a man who moved from Africa and got citizenship), and even he said he was disgusted with black people. So I think it just depends more on location than anything, but portrayal in the media doesn't help form ones opinion either.
 

scosher

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I'm not sure why it is but lighter skin is seen as a positive in most societies around the world. We are growing out of that mentality now but it will take time.

Hollywood becoming globalized may have played into that. Even in Asian cultures, you see a lot of women dying their hair or getting plastic surgery to increase eye size or create an upper eyelid, or lower their brow, all to look more "white."
 

Canuck76

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My mum said that I was scared of black people during a visit to Miami when I was really young. I wasn't used to seeing anyone that wasn't a pasty white nerdy kid, so it was a shock.

Maybe for some people that initial shock turns into fear which turns into hate.

I wasn't scared but it was rare that i would see a black person at all where i lived until i was 16 and we moved somewhere else. Just geographically not a lot of black people lived where i lived. It definitely still happens
 

Az

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I was just waiting for that one post in this thread. Happens every single time.
 

Foxy Fox 39

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I feel like people saying skin arent looking into the issue. skin color alone really doesn't account for much since Indians are often just as dark.
 

Kabouter

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Keep playing man.

No, I don't think he will.
 

Toma

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No, I don't think he will.

Yeah, thanks.

I feel like people saying skin arent looking into the issue. skin color alone really doesn't account for much since Indians are often just as dark.

Thank you very much too. I am trying to get people to their senses, but they wont listen.
 

Parallax

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I feel like people saying skin arent looking into the issue. skin color alone really doesn't account for much since Indians are often just as dark.

And they have a caste system where being dark is considered ugly. Skin color could contribute more than we think
 

Onemic

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And they have a caste system where being dark is considered ugly. Skin color could contribute more than we think

They have it in Asia as well, where Filipinos are considered ugly because they're dark. I even hear it here with those saying they have so called 'yellow fever' that they would never get with a Filipino because they are ugly.

That's fine though as it leaves more for me :D
 

AnathemicOne

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In relation to the thread, I find that Native Africans are easier to befriend with for me than regular African Americans, anyone else find this to be true for them too?
 

Toma

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And they have a caste system where being dark is considered ugly. Skin color could contribute more than we think

The problem with this statement is that those indians dont consider these people ugly because they have a darker skin color, but because of history. Look up the thing about the aryans invading the dominantly dark skinned region and taking over the region to consider themselves the dominant ethnicity. If it were the other way around, and the Aryans had lived there before being invaded by darker skinned people taking over.. the darker skinned people would be viewed more positively.

This has absolutely nothing to do with skin color. Its just how history trickles into current social perception.
 

Prez

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What is this thread? Black people aren't universally hated. I love black people.
 

Toma

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What is this thread? Black people aren't universally hated. I love black people.

Just for the US, some statistics:

Just so you guys have some numbers for your discussion:



This is one of the more recent social distance surveys from 2005 (US). Social distance in this context is a scale that measure how close people of a certain ethnicity do want people from other ethnicities in their near vicinity. The best possible score is 1, the highest 7:



What is striking that there is no entry over 2, although I need to admit that this survey only has been conducted among college students.

Anyway, for the blacks:

Blacks are indeed less liked than the "other ethnicities" overall, excluding whites. Basically every member of a minority that isnt White, African American, American Indian, Jamaican, Muslim, Puerto Ricans, Hispanic and African has a lower social distance to "Other ethnicities" than black. Out of those that DO like blacks more than others ethnicities, only Africans, African Americans and Puerto Ricans show a somewhat significant difference in social distance to blacks (>0,1) compared to other ethnicities.

One of the reasons for that might be a scapegoat behaviour. Ethnic minorities that try to settle in the US typically have a hard time being assimilated into society, but history showed that ethnic minorities who lived out a prejudicial behavior seen from the dominant group, had an easier way of adjusting and assimilating into society. The dominant groups of whites however, as you can see in the social distance statistics, have overall long forgotten to hold a grudge against blacks, and view them as the most assimilated of all non-white ethnicities.

I guess its just that this perception, of whites disliking the backs, still lives on. And therefore projecting that scapegoat behaviour from other minorities onto them.

Of course you still got racial slurs and behaviour from whites, but as the statistics showed, whites have a way closer social distance than what people might perceive. There is still the caveat with this survey being taken among college students, but thats the only thing I can offer right now.

Most people are dead wrong on the reasons though.
 

Trancetronic

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As a black guy, I'll say it like this. If you pay attention and absorb the ignorance, you can't get rid of it. But if you don't pay attention to it, then it doesn't exist.

My first best friend I had was white when I was about 5 years old. We were best buds, and many of my teachers were white. Nobody really cared. I didn't know about racism and such until I learned about it years later in middle and high school. I think if the school systems didn't put so much emphasis on the past history, slavery and such, although it's educational, it fuels people's backburners for hatred.
 

Toma

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That has a whole lot of other reasons other than ethnicity too. First of all its taken from a state that predominantly votes republican. Secondly, there is a very dominant mistrust of educated people in the US and probably a slew more other reasons.

The fact that he is non-white definitely had an effect though, but its definitely not the sole reason for it.
 

Sho_Nuff82

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The problem with this statement is that those indians dont consider these people ugly because they have a darker skin color, but because of history. Look up the thing about the aryans invading the dominantly dark skinned region and taking over the region to consider themselves the dominant ethnicity. If it were the other way around, and the Aryans had lived there before being invaded by darker skinned people taking over.. the darker skinned people would be viewed more positively.

This has absolutely nothing to do with skin color. Its just how history trickles into current social perception.

The darker skinned Rwandans and South Africans were disproportionately pushed into lower classes during 20th century imperialism/apartheid as well. There is obviously historical context behind it, but it has been passed down for generations and generations and reinforced with stereotypes (eg, dark-skinned people talk like this, act like this, work like this, smell like this).
 

Mammoth Jones

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In relation to the thread, I find that Native Africans are easier to befriend with for me than regular African Americans, anyone else find this to be true for them too?

I find that it's easier for me to befriend people whom I share similar humor, interests, perspectives, and hobbies regardless of their skin color. But that's just me....

I have friend across the spectrum and we share interests. That means much more to us than skin color.
 

captmcblack

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Everyone wants to be black. There's nothing more punk rock on Earth than being black. We stroll in, all muscle and sinew and cocoa, fucking the game up like dirty edge connectors. We laugh loud and speak bold and emit "I-just-don't-give-a-fuck" with every movement. We have been scrutinized and analyzed in every conceivable way, and still we are mysterious and exotic right down to the kink of our hair to those - surprising, still numerous - people who haven't been in contact with us before. We've created the rhythm and the blues, the rock and the roll, the hip and the hop. We brought in the noise and the funk. We put the soul in food, and pretty much everything else too. We built your pyramids, and we leap over them with our seemingly impossible collective athleticism, borne of mountains, jungles and plains that many of us still live in all across the world. Everyone wants to be black.

No one wants to be black. There's nothing more terrifying than the knowledge that we exist in every way but individually to everyone - even other black people. We can never be judged by our own merits; we carry the weight of the race's progression with every step into the future like Atlas, and even he shrugged...but we can't, because it's considered weak and selling out if we do. Every bit of slang, every bit of clothing that sits the wrong way, every head nod and hand gesture can and will be taken in the wrong way, a universal "there-goes-the-neighborhood" by everyone that can do so, which basically consists of everyone that doesn't want the social association with black people. That group, naturally, consists of everyone that is able to pass as "non-black". We live in a world where we were kings until we were cattle, and then we were weapons, and then we were like aphids, sprouting up where we weren't wanted, corrupting non-black youth, and the reason for everything from crime to lowered test scores or property value. Nobody wants to be black.

My blackness offends infinitely.
I want to be black.


Also, I'm just not going to address the topic. I'm just going to sit back and watch. I wouldn't say we are universally reviled; it just seems that way sometimes.
 

Toma

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The darker skinned Rwandans and South Africans were disproportionately pushed into lower classes during 20th century imperialism/apartheid as well. There is obviously historical context behind it, but it has been passed down for generations and generations and reinforced with stereotypes (eg, dark-skinned people talk like this, act like this, work like this, smell like this).

True, I am just saying that their skin color is not the REASON for the perceived racism. Like the fairy tale of bulls getting angry when seeing red flags. Most people dont look deep enough into the issue, and ignore comments of people that do. This annoys me greatly.
 

Wilbur

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First of all, the thread title is awful. Incendiary, to say the very least.

Whoever said black people are at their least hated and feared in 200 years of American history is bang on the money. There was this ingratiated behaviour of people coming to native America, taking whatever the fuck they wanted and then those natives were submissive. I only know this from shit like Pocahontas, I'm in no way an expert. But there's people claiming a land that isn't theirs and then dominating a number of people that are a different colour.

Then, the ideology is that these people of colour are submissive, or slaves, or what have you, so why not tar them all with the same brush?

50 years ago in comes Civil Rights and while I'm so far removed from that generation that grew up with their social standing above black people and of course I disagree with it, but it's understandable. A lot of people who were alive 50 years ago and only knew a world where black people moved out of the way for white people and didn't sit on the same bus are still alive, so to the question 'why do they hate black people', my answer is for no reason other than a) they look different, b) people were ignorant enough to believe that looking different meant you were different, and c) that is all they've known.

People of my generation though? Hating black people? Absurd. I'm an 18 year old boy living in South London. At no point would I say my community is predominantly black, but nor would I have ever just taken that as a given and actually thought to myself 'fuck, there's black people here!'

All my life growing up there's been black kids in my class, black people on TV, black people serving me in shops and black people buying the things I sell where I work. I've kissed black girls, I've played football with black guys but
I've never thought 'I'm kissing a black girl', 'I'm playing football with a black guy'. Even things like their athletic ability, or their sexual prowess or whatever, I've never stopped and thought about it. Maybe I'm naive. But maybe I'm just part of a generation that doesn't hate black people because they're as much a part of life as white people.

Culturally? First person in a film I fancied was gypsy Esmerelda from Hunchback. Me fucking a cartoon had nothing to do with her race, it was that hot ass. Nowadays I love guys like Kanye West or actors like Idris Elba, but I love Bob Dylan and Steve Buscemi just as much. The notion that I - or a community - dislike black music because it spreads this train of thought that they're all gangsters, shoot guns, love pussy, whatever; that's just as bizarre a notion to me as saying because I love Bob Dylan, a white Jew (alas, not any more!), I associate him with being unable to dance, or good with finances, or whatever.

Do I notice the social and cultural backgrounds between the two? Yes. Do I recognise that society does differentiate between black people and their history and any other race? Yes.

Does it bother me in any way at all? No. Black music was great, but I don't credit the black race as a whole for coming up with it, it's the individuals that did. If I see African art, it's more to do with that specific African person leaning on cultural experience rather than me going 'oh generic black art'.

I don't really know what point I'm trying to make other than saying that I would presume a lot of GAF are young males, probably predominantly white. So from that generation, if a specific person hates black people, that would be to do with them and not as a community. I've never been brought up to even look at black people differently, let alone hate them.
 

Mammoth Jones

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As a black guy, I'll say it like this. If you pay attention and absorb the ignorance, you can't get rid of it. But if you don't pay attention to it, then it doesn't exist.

I can't agree with that. Not about the absorbtion, but the paying attention. Putting your fingers in your ears and going "La-la-la-la-it's not real!" doesn't help. I gotta pay attention to it. Because when I get pulled over and reach for my wallet I need to know how I will be perceived. Or when I'm walking in a rich neighborhood.

My first best friend I had was white when I was about 5 years old. We were best buds, and many of my teachers were white. Nobody really cared. I didn't know about racism and such until I learned about it years later in middle and high school. I think if the school systems didn't put so much emphasis on the past history, slavery and such, although it's educational, it fuels people's backburners for hatred.


Ignoring the past isn't how you build a positive future. You learn from it.

First time I was called a "Nigger" was while playing soccer during gym class in elementary school. This was WAY before they taught us much of anything about racism. Yet a small child still knew what to call me.
 

ToxicAdam

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What does that even mean to 'be black' or to 'imitate black'. It's almost like you are buying into the simplistic caricature that the media has cast upon you and embraced it or rebelled against it.

All my black neighbors and co-workers are as varied and different as my white ones. From their musical preference, to their tastes in pop culture to their religion and on and on.

ehh .. I'm bailing on this thread. Should have been locked.
 

KillerMan91

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Hollywood becoming globalized may have played into that. Even in Asian cultures, you see a lot of women dying their hair or getting plastic surgery to increase eye size or create an upper eyelid, or lower their brow, all to look more "white."

Actually if I remember right white skin fetish in asia is because historically dark skin has been associated with people who worked in the fields (poor people) and the upper class stayed indoors and in the shade and therefore had whiter skin. Asian people look down on dark skin not because of racism but because they don’t want to be perceived as poor.
 

Tawpgun

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Because they're too OP.

They got more swag
Bigger dicks
Dominate in athletic events

That's why the rest of the world put them down for so many years. Jealousy. Didn't want them ruling the world. That's my theory.
 

Cat Party

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As a black guy, I'll say it like this. If you pay attention and absorb the ignorance, you can't get rid of it. But if you don't pay attention to it, then it doesn't exist.

My first best friend I had was white when I was about 5 years old. We were best buds, and many of my teachers were white. Nobody really cared. I didn't know about racism and such until I learned about it years later in middle and high school. I think if the school systems didn't put so much emphasis on the past history, slavery and such, although it's educational, it fuels people's backburners for hatred.

I have a theory on that. I think what happens is the school presents the history, and then the kid goes home and asks questions and his or her parents put a spin on it. My oldest learned about MLK in school this year, and so she was curious to learn more and talk about him and his life at home. I'm sure there are some kids in her class who went home with the same curiosity and were told very different things than what I told my kid.

The schools should definitely teach this stuff. You can't ignore your history. It's the parents who make their kids racist.
 

Toma

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What does that even mean to 'be black' or to 'imitate black'. It's almost like you are buying into the simplistic caricature that the media has cast upon you and embraced it or rebelled against it.

All my black neighbors and co-workers are as varied and different as my white ones. From their musical preference, to their tastes in pop culture to their religion and on and on.

ehh .. I'm bailing on this thread. Should have been locked.

There is a very valid statistical reason for this thread:

http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showpost.php?p=37708152&postcount=269

And I feel this is indeed an interesting topic which deserves to be discussed. However, the informed posts are far and in between and rarely get attention, while we get worked up about posts that are obviously stupid.

This is one of the more interesting points for example:

Actually if I remember right white skin fetish in asia is because historically dark skin has been associated with people who worked in the fields (poor people) and the upper class stayed indoors and in the shade and therefore had whiter skin. Asian people look down on dark skin not because of racism but because they don’t want to be perceived as poor.

Together with the aforementioned issue about indians.. its not about the skin COLOR that frightens or angers some people, but more what that skin color/ethnicity means in an historical context. Now talking about those contexts, THAT would be interesting.
 

Onemic

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That has a whole lot of other reasons other than ethnicity too. First of all its taken from a state that predominantly votes republican. Secondly, there is a very dominant mistrust of educated people in the US and probably a slew more other reasons.

The fact that he is non-white definitely had an effect though, but its definitely not the sole reason for it.

So how about Filipino's?
 

captmcblack

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What does that even mean to 'be black' or to 'imitate black'. It's almost like you are buying into the simplistic caricature that the media has cast upon you and embraced it or rebelled against it.

All my black neighbors and co-workers are as varied and different as my white ones. From their musical preference, to their tastes in pop culture to their religion and on and on.


Ideally, this would be exactly as perception of people is on the Earth.
Ideally, everyone would be considered on their own personal merit.

But for some reason, people are not considered that way. For some reason, people collectively rely on stereotypes and related things to make their judgments on people, and to identify how they think those people should act or react - and that goes for people of all races, ethnicities, shades and shapes.

Other black people condemn black people for not acting "black", the same way other non-black people condemn black people for acting "black". People associate numerous things with blacks and black culture, even if those things have nothing to do with those people.

But I know you know that.
 

SUPREME1

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-Black people is bigger
-Black people is stronger
-Black people is well adapted to either cold or hot environments
-Black people created the most important music genres in the last 100 years or so.



Except the little old lady down the street probably doesn't care about any of those reasons but still hates them regardless.

That is a terrible list.
 

Onemic

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Sorry, I dont get your question of how Filipinos are related to the Obama voting behaviour.

It was related to the beginning of the discussion you had about how skin has nothing to do with perceived negative stereotypes. It was just the first post I saw that continued from that initial conversation.
 

captmcblack

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That stuff about extra bones in feet or whatever, is that proven?

Like, I feel like if black people collectively had a literal physiological variation in every single one of them, it'd be a big enough deal that you would know about it.

A physical identifier of "blackness" outside of skin tone would be a big deal.
Coincidentally, a surgical procedure to remove those variations would probably become popular for some people.
 

echoshifting

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In relation to the thread, I find that Native Africans are easier to befriend with for me than regular African Americans, anyone else find this to be true for them too?

Depends on the situation, I guess, and the sort of community the person is from. I dunno, I think African Americans are entitled to some deeply ingrained trust issues with white Americans that Native Africans probably have not experienced to the same degree. On the other hand, my experiences with Native Africans are far more limited, so there isn't quite as much evidence to base this conjecture on. I imagine that is true for most here. It's not like Native Africans have no experience with racism...they just aren't as used to the nature of racism in this country. Hell, for many of them, America is probably a huge relief in this department.

I found that when working in communities made up almost entirely of black people, there were certainly those who needed some time to warm up to the new white guy, especially those who were a bit older. Didn't bother me, and I swear when I got over that hump, these were some of the nicest and most welcoming people I have ever met in my life. There may have been a few who never got over it, I guess...and that's not something I've experienced with anyone from say, Ethiopia or Nigeria...but that's like a dozen people, all well motivated to integrate successfully, so it's hard to say if there's any truth to this.

Anyone interested in learning more about the history of racism in this country should really read some Howard Zinn.
 
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