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Coronavirus Global Pandemic |OT| Wuhan!! Got You All In Check

CrapSandwich

former Navy SEAL
Sep 10, 2006
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This is related to Covid so why would I give a fuck about the average agf of Sweden‘s population or the quality of their healthcare system. This is exactly why excess mortality is used as a key figure and not overall mortality. And for this relevant key figure s opposed to your irrelevant one it was the deadliest year since 1918.
Do you English? It's not about age or quality of healthcare. It's about how many people are dying in a year per capita. 2020 will land at about 2012-2013 level for Sweden. Meaning all the years before that, more people were dying each year, adjusted for population size. Meaning almost every year of the past 100 years was deadlier. 2020 would have likely seen a bump in mortality without Covid, considering they had 3 record low years in a row 2017-2019. It would have been much smaller, and the mortality increase in 2020 is undoubtedly historic. It just isn't that bad, though. You can't actually be this dumb, right? I feel like you are just refusing to grasp this very basic concept. 2020 was still a historically great year for total number of people dead in Sweden because any given person had a much lower chance of dying than throughout most of history, with only a few exceptions, and those exceptions are of a minimal difference.
 

arkhamguy123

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Aug 1, 2020
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Seems like the dam is breaking.
It is. I'm gonna throw my hat in the "little too soon" ring. I get mental health. I get social outings. I get it I get it I get it. But we are so close. I would've blown the flood gates open like... Mid April ish? Seems reasonable based on the trends. Get those cases and deaths looooow low. And then we can cautiously dip our foot back in the lovely hot tub that is normal life. But right now? Ehhhhh. I mean, I would LOVE to be wrong and hope we see a continued case decline with these limitations removed but I'm not so sure.

Time will tell.
 
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DragoonKain

Neighbours from Hell
Nov 13, 2013
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I got my second dose of the Pfizer vaccine a little over a week ago. Other than a sore arm, I had no other side effects. Felt great afterwards. Which is different than my experience with the first dose where I had a mild headache and nothing else.

My sister-in-law, however, had to take the day off of work after her second shot. It completely zapped the energy out of her. But she was perfectly fine the next day.
I was supposed to get an email today that has the info for my 2nd shot on there. It's usually the same date and same Rite Aid, it was for everyone I talked to who got theirs that way, but it's not guaranteed. A handful of my family members got theirs at Rite Aid and got their email the next day, I never got mine. Gonna call em if I don't get it tomorrow.
 

MisterFalcon

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Mar 12, 2013
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My goodness is that a misleading thing to say. They had a jump beyond expected mortality due to Covid, but the picture isn't actually that grim. Their overall death rate is still historically modest, despite that big jump from 2019 to 2020.


Those graphs would come hande in war crimes trials.

"Your honor, my client does not deny that his militia killed tens of thousands. But if you look at these graphs we were due some excess deaths due to lower deaths the years before and compared to historical data no one really died"
 
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CrapSandwich

former Navy SEAL
Sep 10, 2006
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Those graphs would come hande in war crimes trials.

"Your honor, my client does not deny that his militia killed tens of thousands. But if you look at these graphs we were due some excess deaths due to lower deaths the years before and compared to historical data no one really died"
Good analogy and on point.
 

ThatOneGrunt

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Feb 23, 2015
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I was supposed to get an email today that has the info for my 2nd shot on there. It's usually the same date and same Rite Aid, it was for everyone I talked to who got theirs that way, but it's not guaranteed. A handful of my family members got theirs at Rite Aid and got their email the next day, I never got mine. Gonna call em if I don't get it tomorrow.
Good luck. Here in arizozna the second shot is guaranteed. At some sites, before you leave after the first shot, you schedule your second dose. In my case, I got the first shot and the second one was already reserved but I had to schedule the date and couldn’t do it until it was closer to the 21 day mark.
 

Majmun

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Just arrived in Kosovo. Everything is open, no mouthmasks. It's basically Texas here.

I'm not against wearing mouthmasks, but after almost three months of total lockdown in the Netherlands, I HAD to escape.
 
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T8SC

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Should the UK "open" sooner? or are 12th April, 17th May & 21st June dates appropriate?
 

Leyasu

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Apr 25, 2014
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Should the UK "open" sooner? or are 12th April, 17th May & 21st June dates appropriate?
The UK has a plan which is syncronised with it's vaccination roll-out. The economic damage is done, and opening sooner could lead to another costly lockdown if it is rushed. Whereas their measured approach coupled with impending herd immunity should make this the last lockdown, with normality returning. And no more costly restrictions. They shouldn't and I don't think they will rush it.

Looking forward.

I think that they will have positive results with regards to children being vaccinated falling around the same time that they will have offered the vaccine to the adult population. Mid Julyish, for which I would bet that they have already factored this into their planning, with a massive roll out for kids with consenting parents happening in the summer holidays. They will also begin stocking and distributing boosters for the Autumn. The UK is setting itself up nicely, and for the first time in 13yrs almost makes me wish that I never left.
 
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Leyasu

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Sorry I was referring to non peer reviewed study that was conducted in the U.K. puts both at around 60% after one dose the Pfizer does provide a tiny bit more efficacy this is against the B.1.1.7 (Kent variant) since it is now the dominant variant here in the U.K.

https://khub.net/documents/13593956...c-b255-8e88-c2dc-88979fc2cc1b?t=1614617945615

Not that it should matter since it’s good that we have access to both and more vaccines.

Jezbollah Jezbollah point was that certain political figures in the EU/member states had slated it by calling it ineffective and not suitable in over 65s when it is and now the these people are having to back track because they have made it political and were stupid for doing so because they have got poor uptake in taking any available vaccine.
Yep, the EU started the negative narrative regarding the AZ vaccine when they were told that they wouldn't get the doses they expected. Now it has been widely used in the UK and the results are better than what was published during the trial, the EU has a lot of people that don't want it. France where I am are desperate to erase the narrative that they helped create.
 
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Hulk_Smash

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The UK has a plan which is syncronised with it's vaccination roll-out. The economic damage is done, and opening sooner could lead to another costly lockdown if it is rushed. Whereas their measured approach coupled with impending herd immunity should make this the last lockdown, with normality returning. And no more costly restrictions. They shouldn't and I don't think they will rush it.

Looking forward.

I think that they will have positive results with regards to children being vaccinated falling around the same time that they will have offered the vaccine to the adult population. Mid Julyish, for which I would bet that they have already factored this into their planning, with a massive roll out for kids with consenting parents happening in the summer holidays. They will also begin stocking and distributing boosters for the Autumn. The UK is setting itself up nicely, and for the first time in 13yrs almost makes me wish that I never left.
They should open today. The economic damage is only done when you decide ahead of time to keep the lockdowns going. The damage could end today if they would end the lockdowns today.

But, I guess we’re still pretending the lockdowns work?
 

T8SC

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My current issue with "lockdown" is that the government seems to think people are following the "stay at home" guidance when they arent. You only have to look on social media to see that.

So basically shops and pubs are closed, some to never open again, and most of the public are just getting on with life doing other things. Exercise once per day? Yeah right. Stay local/home? Yeah right.

A lockdown is pointless if less & less people stay at home, its no wonder the data is showing that numbers are flattening and not decreasing.

So all we're going to be doing is ruining the economy and then people will be using the mental health excuse that they cant be expected to go straight back to full time work after so long off, that Summer sun is required ... furlough until Sept.
 

Leyasu

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They should open today. The economic damage is only done when you decide ahead of time to keep the lockdowns going. The damage could end today if they would end the lockdowns today.

But, I guess we’re still pretending the lockdowns work?
I guess we are still thinking that an airborne virus can infect people when they aren't mixing in large numbers..
 

Jezbollah

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Jun 14, 2010
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All your spike proteins are belong to us.

Wonder if those EU countries that are getting hit by the Brazil variant will now delve into the stockpiles of Ox/AZ they have in storage?
 
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Game Analyst

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Video: Controversy Erupts Over Vaccines in Catholic Church | NBCLA
Catholic leaders in New Orleans and St. Louis are advising Catholics that the COVID-19 vaccine from Johnson & Johnson is “morally compromised” because it’s produced using cell lines developed from aborted fetuses. John Cadiz Klemack reports March 3, 2021.


Edited
 
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ManaByte

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First-stage testing of the experimental COVID-19 pill called Molnupiravir, by Merck and Ridgeback Biotherapeutics, showed promising signs of effectiveness in reducing the virus in patients.

"It may be the holy grail on this because it was just studied in phase two trials and it literally stopped the virus in its tracks," he explained. "And there wasn't any virus found in the patients that were studied."

The drug would function as an at-home, five-day treatment, similar to Tamiflu, to stop the virus from reproducing before causing major damage. Siegel said the therapeutic could come to market in as little as four to five months.
 

EviLore

Expansive Ellipses
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Zefah

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Jan 7, 2007
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Yes but apparently most transmission happens in the home where people aren’t wearing masks.

That would make sense, but I'm not sure it lines up with the massive spikes and dips. I doubt there's *that much* discrepancy throughout the year in terms of home gatherings.
 
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Hulk_Smash

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That would make sense, but I'm not sure it lines up with the massive spikes and dips. I doubt there's *that much* discrepancy throughout the year in terms of home gatherings.
The biggest spike happened from the last week of November to the first week of January (and the lag meant you would see the spike continued through the second week of January). Gee, you know what? Now that I think about it, I can’t think of a single thing in those 5 weeks that would cause massive amounts of people to travel great distances to be with the families...
 

Zefah

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The biggest spike happened from the last week of November to the first week of January (and the lag meant you would see the spike continued through the second week of January). Gee, you know what? Now that I think about it, I can’t think of a single thing in those 5 weeks that would cause massive amounts of people to travel great distances to be with the families...

OK. So what caused the massive sustained increase leading up to that? Furthermore, what caused the increase in the summer months after mask wearing had been established?
 
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Hulk_Smash

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OK. So what caused the massive sustained increase leading up to that? Furthermore, what caused the increase in the summer months after mask wearing had been established?
It’s a fact you’re 19x more likely to spread covid at home.

Not sure about the others, but the big one is obvious. Considering that the spikes happened with or without mask mandates, with or without lockdowns, just goes to show lockdowns don’t work.

People will and have found ways to gather anyway.
 
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Zefah

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It’s a fact you’re 19x more likely to spread covid at home.

Not sure about the others, but the big one is obvious. Considering that the spikes happened with or without mask mandates, with or without lockdowns, just goes to show lockdowns don’t work.

People will and have found ways to gather anyway.

The big one *sounds* obvious, and I certainly suspect it's the case, but if you can't use it to explain the rest of the movements then you have to at least remain skeptical, no?

Also, I don't mean to pick on you or anything, but your threshold for citing something as a "fact" is quite low in my opinion. From your article:

A second study out of Japan, from the country's National Institute of Infectious Diseases, also aimed to get a better understanding of what environments promoted transmission of COVID-19. Their findings, also not yet peer reviewed, were very similar. After looking at 110 cases across 11 outbreaks, the scientists found that "the odds that a primary case transmitted COVID-19 in a closed environment was 18.7 times greater compared to an open-air environment"—meaning, yes, the coronavirus is coming from inside the house.
 
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Hulk_Smash

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The big one *sounds* obvious, and I certainly suspect it's the case, but if you can't use it to explain the rest of the movements then you have to at least remain skeptical, no?

Also, I don't mean to pick on you or anything, but your threshold for citing something as a "fact" is quite low in my opinion. From your article:
Yeah I guess. But cmon. It’s so commonly experienced, I don’t see how you can deny the fact that transmission is more likely to happen with people you know and interact with on a daily basis than some stranger at a restaurant.
 

Zefah

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Yeah I guess. But cmon. It’s so commonly experienced, I don’t see how you can deny the fact that transmission is more likely to happen with people you know and interact with on a daily basis than some stranger at a restaurant.

It certainly stands to reason that being in a poorly ventilated indoor location with other people for long periods of time would be riskier than outdoor encounters, but I'm not prepared to pretend like I have the actual numbers indicating that such indoor meetings represent the majority source of spread. Generally home gatherings are going to involve pretty small groups of people, so at some point those that got infected need to go out and spread to large groups of people all at once to really achieve the kind of spread we are seeing, I would speculate.
 

Hulk_Smash

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It certainly stands to reason that being in a poorly ventilated indoor location with other people for long periods of time would be riskier than outdoor encounters, but I'm not prepared to pretend like I have the actual numbers indicating that such indoor meetings represent the majority source of spread. Generally home gatherings are going to involve pretty small groups of people, so at some point those that got infected need to go out and spread to large groups of people all at once to really achieve the kind of spread we are seeing, I would speculate.
Well, how do you explain the spikes? With or without masks or lockdowns it seems to not effect them at all.
 
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Zefah

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Well, how do you explain the spikes? With or without masks or lockdowns it seems to not effect them at all.

I don't have the answers, but it does seem like only extremely strict lockdowns (basically eliminating human contact outside of the home) work for consistently reducing, which makes sense. Doesn't mean I support them, of course.
 
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CrankyJay™

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OK. So what caused the massive sustained increase leading up to that? Furthermore, what caused the increase in the summer months after mask wearing had been established?
It occurred in Texas, Georgia, Arizona and Florida, all when their temps would be at their highest so more people are indoors with the air conditioning.

Same with October/November as North Easteners head back inside for heat.

I’m not saying this is THE sole cause but I believe it’s a contributing factor.
 

FireFly

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They should open today. The economic damage is only done when you decide ahead of time to keep the lockdowns going. The damage could end today if they would end the lockdowns today.

But, I guess we’re still pretending the lockdowns work?
Individuals collectively changing their behaviour works, as you can see with the huge spikes and equally huge falls that have consistently occurred, and were initially claimed to be caused by "herd immunity". (Just see Portugal for the latest example) It's an open question what would happen to behaviour if non-essential shops and restaurants were immediately re-opened in the UK.
 

Hulk_Smash

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Individuals collectively changing their behaviour works, as you can see with the huge spikes and equally huge falls that have consistently occurred, and were initially claimed to be caused by "herd immunity". (Just see Portugal for the latest example) It's an open question what would happen to behaviour if non-essential shops and restaurants were immediately re-opened in the UK.
You’d have one more mini spike and then flatline. That’s my prediction.

What we don’t need are governments overreacting to the next spike.
 

vvinter

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Nice world we live in. Vaccines sold to countries which offer higher prices meanwhile Europe is left behind. All for money.