• Hey, guest user. Hope you're enjoying NeoGAF! Have you considered registering for an account? Come join us and add your take to the daily discourse.

Fitness |OT9|...You looked better before

12Goblins

Member
Mar 1, 2017
1,238
1,294
445
Cultivating a healthy gut flora is a lifestyle, not a supplement you can buy. But It's relationship between the body and we are now finding out the mind are sound, there is a lot of science to prove this.
 

DunDunDunpachi

Patient MembeR
Apr 18, 2018
13,133
23,798
1,260
USA
dunpachi.com
Started running on a regular basis, just taking laps in my backyard to build up stamina. I used to bike to work but my bike is kaput, sadly. As an ex-smoker (a couple years quit, to be fair), the breathing exercises over the years have made a tremendous impact on my lung capacity. My problem before was getting winded too quickly to maintain a pace. Now I can actually push myself until my muscles begin getting sore which is huge for me. I'd like to build up my endurance to 30 minutes (~3 miles) of unbroken pace. From there I will increase speed and start slicing minutes off that mile time.

I also started up the rowing machine again. I go for about 20m and then stop. Rowing, pushups, planks/shoulder-taps, lunges, sit-ups, hand-weights for arms, and now running is my routine.

Goal is to build up some running stamina so that I can continue jogging through the winter months. I'm really excited to get back into cold training. Cold showers simply aren't cutting it anymore, though they feel great.

i inject my buttcheeks with bear meat and steroids
Fix'd
 
  • Like
Reactions: Off Duty Ninja

Porcile

Member
Oct 23, 2012
4,397
172
505
I've been going to the gym and muscle building/strength building for about three times a week for a couple months or so now. I basically started from absolutely zero. It's a hard road lol.
 
  • Fire
Reactions: Off Duty Ninja

Tesseract

Crushed by Thanos
Dec 7, 2008
36,314
9,302
1,340
time to spit blood, gonna elliptical, row, cycle until my muscles scream out for god but he's not there is he

no he's not
 

404Ender

Member
Jun 17, 2006
3,830
293
1,245
I'm looking to get back into some strength training after a bit of a hiatus.

I have a history of going through StrongLifts / Starting Strength and eventually running through 5/3/1-style programs. I had surgery on a herniated disk about 12 years ago, and while I made a full recovery and was comfortably squatting, deadlifting, etc, at some point I aggravated the injury and scar tissue a bit (luckily did not re-herniate) and have since not really been able to work barbell squats or deadlifts into my training.

I kept training for a while with less straining but also less effective lower body exercises (pretty much impossible to match squats and deadlifts), but life caught up with me (work, new house, and a newborn) and it's been 6-8 months since I've done anything with any kind of consistency.

Now I'm considering giving the routine over at /r/bodyweightfitness a try. It's much easier for me to work out from home vs. joining a gym at the moment, and I've always wanted to give calisthenics a try after years of barbell training. I'm also much less concerned about getting big and building muscle as I previously was, so I'm fine with the trade-off of bodyweight stuff vs. barbell.

I'm going to buy a wall-mounted pull-up bar for our garage, some rings, and dip bars (something like this). I've looked at options from Rogue Fitness, Titan, etc, and they all look generally good, so I'm wondering if anyone has any specific equipment recommendations?

I've had the toughest time with dip bars, and finding a set that's high enough that I can get full depth with straight legs and without touching the ground (I think the Titan set I linked to is a bit too short for that) for an easier time while wearing a weight belt. Also, in the past I've preferred this style of pull-up grip (not sure what it's called -- it's not neutral/hammer grip, because it's angled out, but it's similar). But I haven't seen that configuration on any of the pull-up bars I've seen while shopping. It's not a dealbreaker, but it'd be a nice option to have if possible.

I'm also looking for some guidance on how far from the wall I should be aiming for the pull-up bar to extend in order to maximize the ring-based exercises I can comfortably do. It seems like most places offer several options for depth.
 
Apr 18, 2014
2,675
1,369
670
P-Town
I'm looking to get back into some strength training after a bit of a hiatus.

I have a history of going through StrongLifts / Starting Strength and eventually running through 5/3/1-style programs. I had surgery on a herniated disk about 12 years ago, and while I made a full recovery and was comfortably squatting, deadlifting, etc, at some point I aggravated the injury and scar tissue a bit (luckily did not re-herniate) and have since not really been able to work barbell squats or deadlifts into my training.

I kept training for a while with less straining but also less effective lower body exercises (pretty much impossible to match squats and deadlifts), but life caught up with me (work, new house, and a newborn) and it's been 6-8 months since I've done anything with any kind of consistency.

Now I'm considering giving the routine over at /r/bodyweightfitness a try. It's much easier for me to work out from home vs. joining a gym at the moment, and I've always wanted to give calisthenics a try after years of barbell training. I'm also much less concerned about getting big and building muscle as I previously was, so I'm fine with the trade-off of bodyweight stuff vs. barbell.

I'm going to buy a wall-mounted pull-up bar for our garage, some rings, and dip bars (something like this). I've looked at options from Rogue Fitness, Titan, etc, and they all look generally good, so I'm wondering if anyone has any specific equipment recommendations?

I've had the toughest time with dip bars, and finding a set that's high enough that I can get full depth with straight legs and without touching the ground (I think the Titan set I linked to is a bit too short for that) for an easier time while wearing a weight belt. Also, in the past I've preferred this style of pull-up grip (not sure what it's called -- it's not neutral/hammer grip, because it's angled out, but it's similar). But I haven't seen that configuration on any of the pull-up bars I've seen while shopping. It's not a dealbreaker, but it'd be a nice option to have if possible.

I'm also looking for some guidance on how far from the wall I should be aiming for the pull-up bar to extend in order to maximize the ring-based exercises I can comfortably do. It seems like most places offer several options for depth.
The only piece of equipment I own other than some small dumbbells is this pull up bar. I have it installed on my back porch and it has been great. Granted, it is the only pull up bar I've ever really used so I don't have anything to compare it to.

For dips I use different furniture pieces available but I have to curl my legs up and cross them to avoid them hitting the ground. Is there a benefit to the dip bars and the ability to keep your legs straight?

It sounds like you've got a good plan so far. I like the body weight stuff because I don't want to be bulky. I like to be lean and quick with strength and endurance. For me this is the best way to get there. If I ever have a home with a garage I want to add some rings as well as a heavy bag.
 

Ornlu

Member
Oct 31, 2018
509
523
310
oh hell yeah life goals hit that 100 pull up endurance challenge and let your muscles quake with the pain of your ancestors
100 pullups in a row with no rests sounds crazy. Even with pushups, most athletes can't get past 70-80 with no rests. Unless the form is shit or something.
 
  • Fire
Reactions: Off Duty Ninja
Apr 18, 2014
2,675
1,369
670
P-Town
100 pullups in a row with no rests sounds crazy. Even with pushups, most athletes can't get past 70-80 with no rests. Unless the form is shit or something.
You've got to aim high! They only do a few at a time from what I've seen but it adds up.


This guy used to hold the world record and has been all over the podcast circuit about his story. I like this video because they put together some fantastic motivational videos. On mornings when I am not feeling it their videos can help me get moving.

 
Last edited:

404Ender

Member
Jun 17, 2006
3,830
293
1,245
The only piece of equipment I own other than some small dumbbells is this pull up bar. I have it installed on my back porch and it has been great. Granted, it is the only pull up bar I've ever really used so I don't have anything to compare it to.

For dips I use different furniture pieces available but I have to curl my legs up and cross them to avoid them hitting the ground. Is there a benefit to the dip bars and the ability to keep your legs straight?
That pull-up bar looks nice, although it might not be too great for hanging rings from because of how "crooked" it is.

Dips with straight legs makes it a bit easier to maintain proper form, and lets you hit triceps much harder if you want to do that variation. It also makes weighted dips easier (the plates usually hang lower than your legs in a "knees bent + legs curled" position, so you need more clearance, although not necessarily full straight-leg amount of clearance).

oh hell yeah life goals hit that 100 pull up endurance challenge and let your muscles quake with the pain of your ancestors
At that point it's much less a feat of strength and much more about training that specific exercise for endurance. You don't increase your # of pull-ups by getting a super strong back. You get there by doing a fuckton of pull-ups over and over and over again.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Off Duty Ninja

Tesseract

Crushed by Thanos
Dec 7, 2008
36,314
9,302
1,340
That pull-up bar looks nice, although it might not be too great for hanging rings from because of how "crooked" it is.

Dips with straight legs makes it a bit easier to maintain proper form, and lets you hit triceps much harder if you want to do that variation. It also makes weighted dips easier (the plates usually hang lower than your legs in a "knees bent + legs curled" position, so you need more clearance, although not necessarily full straight-leg amount of clearance).



At that point it's much less a feat of strength and much more about training that specific exercise for endurance. You don't increase your # of pull-ups by getting a super strong back. You get there by doing a fuckton of pull-ups over and over and over again.
endurance matters, spit blood or git gud 404
 
  • LOL
Reactions: Off Duty Ninja
Apr 18, 2014
2,675
1,369
670
P-Town
Phew, its been a crazy couple of weeks. My son ended up in the ICU over the weekend after having a seizure at his group home. It is really tough because it would be easy for me to say "See, they aren't able to care for my son, just like I was worried about" except the reality of it is that we couldn't take care of him either. It is really heartbreaking but it is also why I am so determined to maintain my fitness level. It is the only thing I really feel like I ahve any control over at the end of the day. Me and my body.

I haven't ran in over a week but I have been doing squats and push ups whenever I can. Life comes at you fast and you have to be ready. Stay strong my friends. :messenger_bicep::messenger_fistbump:
 

Tesseract

Crushed by Thanos
Dec 7, 2008
36,314
9,302
1,340
Phew, its been a crazy couple of weeks. My son ended up in the ICU over the weekend after having a seizure at his group home. It is really tough because it would be easy for me to say "See, they aren't able to care for my son, just like I was worried about" except the reality of it is that we couldn't take care of him either. It is really heartbreaking but it is also why I am so determined to maintain my fitness level. It is the only thing I really feel like I ahve any control over at the end of the day. Me and my body.

I haven't ran in over a week but I have been doing squats and push ups whenever I can. Life comes at you fast and you have to be ready. Stay strong my friends. :messenger_bicep::messenger_fistbump:
stay strong brother, god bless
 

TheExorzist

Member
Jun 17, 2006
9,409
1,044
1,350
A weird question perhaps… The biggest pro of fibre rich carbs is that they tend to fill you up for longer right? I know they are also a bit healthier but not that much right?

Thing is, I started my bulk a couple of weeks ago and since up until now I used to eat fibre rich carbs exclusivsily I found myself hitting my threshhold already. I mean, eating a bowl of pure oats in the morning, then a bowl of brown rice at noon and a bowl of instant oats before my training… It's just too much for my intestines already. I walk aroud all day long feeling full - and my plan was to gain another 5-10 kg. Just the thought of Eating even more of that shit is causing me panic.

So in order to tackle my issue I thought about cutting down my oats a bit and instead adding Cornflakes to my breakfast, adding white rice to my lunch and white flour to my bread (used to be full grain). Otherwise I see no way to continue my bulk. It's just not possible.

Hence my initial question. Fibre rich meals are usually recommended to people because they fill one up longer, right? Eating less fibre carbs should not have any negative effects of muscle growth or fat loss compared to fibre rich carbs as long a the calories stay the same, right? I have no problem feeling hungry whatsoever. I acutally love the feeling when my stomach is empty.
 
Last edited:

DunDunDunpachi

Patient MembeR
Apr 18, 2018
13,133
23,798
1,260
USA
dunpachi.com
A weird question perhaps… The biggest pro of fibre rich carbs is that they tend to fill you up for longer right? I know they are also a bit healthier but not that much right?

Thing is, I started my bulk a couple of weeks ago and since up until now I used to eat fibre rich carbs exclusivsily I found myself hitting my threshhold already. I mean, eating a bowl of pure oats in the morning, then a bowl of brown rice at noon and a bowl of instant oats before my training… It's just too much for my intestines already. I walk aroud all day long feeling full - and my plan was to gain another 5-10 kg. Just the thought of Eating even more of that shit is causing me panic.

So in order to tackle my issue I thought about cutting down my oats a bit and instead adding Cornflakes to my breakfast, adding white rice to my lunch and white flour to my bread (used to be full grain). Otherwise I see no way to continue my bulk. It's just not possible.

Hence my initial question. Fibre rich meals are usually recommended to people because they fill one up longer, right? Eating less fibre carbs should not have any negative effects of muscle growth or fat loss compared to fibre rich carbs as long a the calories stay the same, right? I have no problem feeling hungry whatsoever. I acutally love the feeling when my stomach is empty.
Eat more fats and proteins, since they also fill you up but don't necessarily make you feel full all day long.
 

DunDunDunpachi

Patient MembeR
Apr 18, 2018
13,133
23,798
1,260
USA
dunpachi.com
Thanks mate but I am aware of how I can change my diet. That does not answer my question of the Health of easy digestable carbs though,
Then why are you asking if you already know? Eat your white rice if you want. Or eat fats and protein. I was providing a better alternative to low-fiber carbs, per your question. A healthy body isn't made up of cornflakes and white rice.
 

Cunth

Fingerlickin' Good!
May 22, 2018
4,636
13,017
825
Fibre just aids digestion doesn’t it? Shouldn’t affect your muscles
 

TheExorzist

Member
Jun 17, 2006
9,409
1,044
1,350
Then why are you asking if you already know? Eat your white rice if you want. Or eat fats and protein. I was providing a better alternative to low-fiber carbs, per your question. A healthy body isn't made up of cornflakes and white rice.
I didn't ask for alternatives though. I asked about the differences between low fibre and high fibre carbs...

Fibre just aids digestion doesn’t it? Shouldn’t affect your muscles
Yes, it does. That's why I'm actually surprised as well. I did some casual reasearch on the internet though and found some reports saying that eating too much fibre can cause issues. So while moderate amounts of fibre are excellent for digestion, too much of it seems to cause havok in your intestines. And it looks like that this is the case for me. Anecdotal perhaps but today I ate a mixed bread and even though it was the same amount as last week (where I had huge issues with my intestines) I don't have any problems. Have to watch this for the next couple of days.

So funny when you eat the same shit all the time. Change something and you immediately notice a difference. :messenger_tears_of_joy:
 
Last edited:
D

Deleted member 752119

Unconfirmed Member
The main thing with simple vs complex carbs is that simple carbs (sugars, white bread, white rice, potatoes etc) are more easily stored by the body as fat while complex carbs (whole grain breads, brown rice, sweet potatoes) etc are more used as energy and more pooped out due to being fibrous.

Simple carbs should be limited by everyone. Complex carbs depend on your goal. If you’re trying to lose fat and get lean they should be limited or even avoided. If you’re trying to put on muscle you need a lot of complex carbs and lean proteins during bulking phases. If you’re an endurance athlete and are working on improving pace and distance you need a lot of complex carbs for energy, same if you’re a power lifter aiming to lift super heavy weights.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Off Duty Ninja
Apr 18, 2014
2,675
1,369
670
P-Town
Got a 2 mile run in this morning before the sunrise. I know it was a good one because I dry heaved 4-5 times right as I was finishing and almost let it loose but held my shit down.

My route is downhill the first mile and uphill the second so my splits are affected by that along with my fitness level of course. First mile was 9:18 and the second 10:50.

I posted a thread on off topic about my son moving in to a group home about a month and a half ago now. As I ntoed earlier he ended up in the ICU over the weekend and they group home staff wanted a meeting today with us but I have to work (burned all FMLA and PTO already this year) so she is going to be advocating for our son and family today.

We're afraid that the group home is going to ask him to be removed due to his medical fragility. We don't want him there if they can't care for him, he did end up in the ICU due to a seizure caused most likely by low blood sodium. His diet is very complicated to manage but we somehow managed it for 13 years without this occurring. We've improvised, adapted and overcome all the hurdles placed before us in his life.

Anyways, we will do the same if he has to come back home. The sad thing is it would most likely leave us with two final options.

1. He comes home and we do our best to keep our heads above water managing his care along with our other child and run the risk of drowning from the stress and pressure at any moment.

2. We completely give up our parental rights and put him into the fucked up world of the Foster care system. all because we can't manage the care for our son alone.

That is the harsh reality we're likely facing today. I will update my other thread based on the outcome today but this is what drives me these days.

I am hoping that the home can take the care instructions from the medical staff involved and take precautions to avoid this happening again while also keeping him in the home but if they truly aren't able to manage it with the staff they have we will find a way. We always have.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DunDunDunpachi

TheExorzist

Member
Jun 17, 2006
9,409
1,044
1,350
The main thing with simple vs complex carbs is that simple carbs (sugars, white bread, white rice, potatoes etc) are more easily stored by the body as fat while complex carbs (whole grain breads, brown rice, sweet potatoes) etc are more used as energy and more pooped out due to being fibrous.

Simple carbs should be limited by everyone. Complex carbs depend on your goal. If you’re trying to lose fat and get lean they should be limited or even avoided. If you’re trying to put on muscle you need a lot of complex carbs and lean proteins during bulking phases. If you’re an endurance athlete and are working on improving pace and distance you need a lot of complex carbs for energy, same if you’re a power lifter aiming to lift super heavy weights.
Are you absolutely sure about that? Say you eat the same amount of high/low fibre carbs with the same amount of calories. And even though it’s the same amount of calories/energy the low fibre carb meal will lead to more body fat than high fibre carb meal? That’s what I’m curious about tbh and I wasn’t able to find any study or report about this. I can only find reports of high fibre carbs being more healthy because they’re less processed and them making you less hungry, all of which I was already aware of.
 
D

Deleted member 752119

Unconfirmed Member
Are you absolutely sure about that? Say you eat the same amount of high/low fibre carbs with the same amount of calories. And even though it’s the same amount of calories/energy the low fibre carb meal will lead to more body fat than high fibre carb meal? That’s what I’m curious about tbh and I wasn’t able to find any study or report about this. I can only find reports of high fibre carbs being more healthy because they’re less processed and them making you less hungry, all of which I was already aware of.
It’s not my area of expertise so I can’t say it with scientific certainty or anything,bBut that was the gist of the nutrition literature I got when I read some studies a few years back.

The feeling fuller part of it is also important for weight loss of course. But it is the case that not all calories are created equal. Some types of food get converted fat more easily, some are harder to digest and the body gets fewer nutrients from them, some types of fat are healthy in proper portions others much less so etc.

In any case, simple carbs are worse for you and should be limited regardless of the reason they’re linked to weight gain.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

DunDunDunpachi

Patient MembeR
Apr 18, 2018
13,133
23,798
1,260
USA
dunpachi.com
Are you absolutely sure about that? Say you eat the same amount of high/low fibre carbs with the same amount of calories. And even though it’s the same amount of calories/energy the low fibre carb meal will lead to more body fat than high fibre carb meal? That’s what I’m curious about tbh and I wasn’t able to find any study or report about this. I can only find reports of high fibre carbs being more healthy because they’re less processed and them making you less hungry, all of which I was already aware of.
Simple carbs (sugar, refined carbs) are processed in the liver once they've been broken off of any fats or fibre. The process of converting these sugars into easily-available stored energy (glycogen) is not regulated by your satiation levels but by your hormones like insulin. Once your body "detects" (not quite an accurate description) that your liver and muscle tissues have enough available glycogen (about 400 - 600 grams for the average adult) , then your liver begins converting excess carbs into fat molecules for long-term storage. Sugar is processed in the liver almost the same way as alcohol, and just like your liver can only handle so much alcohol at once, a spike in sugar is going to push your metabolism into "fat storage" mode more easily.

The idea of eating complex / fibrous carbs (or limiting carbs and eating fat instead) is that your body is less likely to enter this fat-storing range where it "detects" (again, not a precise descriptor, but it fits) you have enough stored glycogen. Since the carbs are being processed slower (sometimes called "low glycemic index foods") you aren't getting a spike in sugar. Therefore, you are less likely to begin the process of storing excess glycogen as body fat.

If you want the full-blown scientific paper on the metabolism of glycogen:

 

TheExorzist

Member
Jun 17, 2006
9,409
1,044
1,350
Simple carbs (sugar, refined carbs) are processed in the liver once they've been broken off of any fats or fibre. The process of converting these sugars into easily-available stored energy (glycogen) is not regulated by your satiation levels but by your hormones like insulin. Once your body "detects" (not quite an accurate description) that your liver and muscle tissues have enough available glycogen (about 400 - 600 grams for the average adult) , then your liver begins converting excess carbs into fat molecules for long-term storage. Sugar is processed in the liver almost the same way as alcohol, and just like your liver can only handle so much alcohol at once, a spike in sugar is going to push your metabolism into "fat storage" mode more easily.

The idea of eating complex / fibrous carbs (or limiting carbs and eating fat instead) is that your body is less likely to enter this fat-storing range where it "detects" (again, not a precise descriptor, but it fits) you have enough stored glycogen. Since the carbs are being processed slower (sometimes called "low glycemic index foods") you aren't getting a spike in sugar. Therefore, you are less likely to begin the process of storing excess glycogen as body fat.

If you want the full-blown scientific paper on the metabolism of glycogen:

Mate, this is exactly what I’ve been looking for. Thank you!

I’m still going to try what I’m doing now for a few weeks and if it doesn’t work I’m going to replace the carbs with fat. But does that even work if I’m not going keto? Bulk with fat and protein while keeping the carbs the same? Because I honestly do not want to cut my carbs completely as I love the energy they provide.
 
Last edited:

DunDunDunpachi

Patient MembeR
Apr 18, 2018
13,133
23,798
1,260
USA
dunpachi.com
Mate, this is exactly what I’ve been looking for. Thank you!

I’m still goin to try what I,m doing now for a few weeks and if it doesn’t work I’m going to replace the carbs with fat. But does that even work if I’m not going keto? Bulk with fat and protein while keeping the carbs the same? Because I honestly do not want to cut my carbs completely as I love the energy they provide.
I have never gone keto on purpose, but my fasting habit plus my general diet means I am ketogenic most of the time. Eat carbs if you want to. Just be aware of what they do. I had two huge slices of homemade chocolate cake for my anniversary this weekend. Didn't really matter because I didn't eat a bunch of bread, pasta, etc (normal meal carbs) so my glycogen remained fairly low.

Instead of thinking only about calories, you want to think about how your body is going to respond to the food. I am paraphrasing an explanation I read a while ago which really opened my eyes:

In this illustration, your body requires exactly 2000 calories and you won't go up or go down in weight. In one example, you eat 2000 calories of refined sugar. In other other example, you eat 2000 calories of lard. The result should be the same under the traditional view of calories in, calories out, right?

On the fat diet, your body will slowly digest the fats (about 40 hours) and break them down into fatty acids using bile. These travel around your body as a complex molecule and are "chipped away" at by the cells for growth, energy, and repair. If your blood is especially high in fat, your adipose tissue will help by stripping off triglycerides for storage. Eventually, all that is left behind is a cholesterol molecule which your liver can use to synthesize a lot of helpful compounds.

However, on the sugar diet, digestion is faster (about 30 minutes). Your insulin level will sharply rise, your insulin resistance will go up over the course of a few days of this diet, and your threshhold for entering "glycogen fat storage mode" will go down. Worse, your body's ability to tap into fat stores will be damaged because high insulin levels prevent the body from pulling from stored fat. Since you're eating sugar, your insulin will remain high, so you will be blocked -- at a metabolic level -- from accessing stored fat. Even if you feel like you are starving, your body will be packing on pounds of fat while it becomes increasingly unable to tap into those fat stores. A real-life example of this occurring in the human body is known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which is very common in the sugar-loving USA.

A super-fit adonis won't notice much of a difference at first. Their fitness level will allow them to handle the fat and sugar more-or-less equally and "calories in, calories out" will be true for the first week or two (maybe). But behind the scenes, the sugar is transforming their metabolism and making it harder and harder to maintain their fitness level, whereas the fat will just... be digested like fat usually is.

Neither of these diets would be "healthy" and my explanation simplifies other metabolic processes, but that's the gist of it.
 

TheExorzist

Member
Jun 17, 2006
9,409
1,044
1,350
I have never gone keto on purpose, but my fasting habit plus my general diet means I am ketogenic most of the time. Eat carbs if you want to. Just be aware of what they do. I had two huge slices of homemade chocolate cake for my anniversary this weekend. Didn't really matter because I didn't eat a bunch of bread, pasta, etc (normal meal carbs) so my glycogen remained fairly low.

Instead of thinking only about calories, you want to think about how your body is going to respond to the food. I am paraphrasing an explanation I read a while ago which really opened my eyes:

In this illustration, your body requires exactly 2000 calories and you won't go up or go down in weight. In one example, you eat 2000 calories of refined sugar. In other other example, you eat 2000 calories of lard. The result should be the same under the traditional view of calories in, calories out, right?

On the fat diet, your body will slowly digest the fats (about 40 hours) and break them down into fatty acids using bile. These travel around your body as a complex molecule and are "chipped away" at by the cells for growth, energy, and repair. If your blood is especially high in fat, your adipose tissue will help by stripping off triglycerides for storage. Eventually, all that is left behind is a cholesterol molecule which your liver can use to synthesize a lot of helpful compounds.

However, on the sugar diet, digestion is faster (about 30 minutes). Your insulin level will sharply rise, your insulin resistance will go up over the course of a few days of this diet, and your threshhold for entering "glycogen fat storage mode" will go down. Worse, your body's ability to tap into fat stores will be damaged because high insulin levels prevent the body from pulling from stored fat. Since you're eating sugar, your insulin will remain high, so you will be blocked -- at a metabolic level -- from accessing stored fat. Even if you feel like you are starving, your body will be packing on pounds of fat while it becomes increasingly unable to tap into those fat stores. A real-life example of this occurring in the human body is known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which is very common in the sugar-loving USA.

A super-fit adonis won't notice much of a difference at first. Their fitness level will allow them to handle the fat and sugar more-or-less equally and "calories in, calories out" will be true for the first week or two (maybe). But behind the scenes, the sugar is transforming their metabolism and making it harder and harder to maintain their fitness level, whereas the fat will just... be digested like fat usually is.

Neither of these diets would be "healthy" and my explanation simplifies other metabolic processes, but that's the gist of it.
Just to clarify... I do not eat sugar or sweets and haven't been eating them for months. I will add one piece of sweet this weekend though. Meaning, I'll eat a Magnum icecream or small chocolate bar a week. Literally all I want to do now is to replace some of my complex carbs with simpler carbs. Not because of the taste or anything but I just can't stand it being full any more and it is not possible for me to bulk this way. I just can't. So all I want to do now is to instead of making my bread with 400g of wholemeal flour to use mixed bread with 200 g of white flour and 200 g of wholemeal flour. Same with the rice. Instead of 100 g of brown rice, 50 g of white rice and 50 g of brown rice. And instead of 100 g of oats in the morning, 50 g of oat and 50 g of cornflakes. That's it. And then slowly increase the low fibre carb while keeping the high fibre carbs the same.

It's not about me wanting to stuff myself with sweets. The ship where I even care about the taste of my food has long sailed. Hell, I eat raw Tofu after my training. I just want to make it easier to digest the food and I really want to avoid doing keto because I'm almost veggi (I only eat meat once a month) and happy with it. Actually, I'm happy with everything. My looks, my progress, name it. I just want to slowly gain some weight without feeling full of the fucking time. And with my current high carb diet this is.... not... possible. And this from someone who is 83 kg and 1,95m height. What the actual fuck?!
 
  • Thoughtful
Reactions: DunDunDunpachi

DunDunDunpachi

Patient MembeR
Apr 18, 2018
13,133
23,798
1,260
USA
dunpachi.com
Just to clarify... I do not eat sugar or sweets and haven't been eating them for months. I will add one piece of sweet this weekend though. Meaning, I'll eat a Magnum icecream or small chocolate bar a week. Literally all I want to do now is to replace some of my complex carbs with simpler carbs. Not because of the taste or anything but I just can't stand it being full any more and it is not possible for me to bulk this way. I just can't. So all I want to do now is to instead of making my bread with 400g of wholemeal flour to use mixed bread with 200 g of white flour and 200 g of wholemeal flour. Same with the rice. Instead of 100 g of brown rice, 50 g of white rice and 50 g of brown rice. And instead of 100 g of oats in the morning, 50 g of oat and 50 g of cornflakes. That's it. And then slowly increase the low fibre carb while keeping the high fibre carbs the same.

It's not about me wanting to stuff myself with sweets. The ship where I even care about the taste of my food has long sailed. Hell, I eat raw Tofu after my training. I just want to make it easier to digest the food and I really want to avoid doing keto because I'm almost veggi (I only eat meat once a month) and happy with it. Actually, I'm happy with everything. My looks, my progress, name it. I just want to slowly gain some weight without feeling full of the fucking time. And with my current high carb diet this is.... not... possible. And this from someone who is 83 kg and 1,95m height. What the actual fuck?!
I'm not a dietician so that sounds good to me. The only reason why I use sugar in my explanation is because it makes it easier for me to show the contrast. Any of the sources of "simple carbs" you mentioned have a lot more fiber (and protein, and vitamins) than refined sugar, and will therefore not have the same sort of drastic effect that I described.

If you want to go up in muscle weight, though, wouldn't you want to eat more protein? The "bulk" from carbo loading is literally water weight i.e. glycogenic fluid retained in your muscle tissues for stored energy. It's not true "bulk".
 

TheExorzist

Member
Jun 17, 2006
9,409
1,044
1,350
I'm not a dietician so that sounds good to me. The only reason why I use sugar in my explanation is because it makes it easier for me to show the contrast. Any of the sources of "simple carbs" you mentioned have a lot more fiber (and protein, and vitamins) than refined sugar, and will therefore not have the same sort of drastic effect that I described.

If you want to go up in muscle weight, though, wouldn't you want to eat more protein? The "bulk" from carbo loading is literally water weight i.e. glycogenic fluid retained in your muscle tissues for stored energy. It's not true "bulk".
I'm already way over 200g of protein a day, which is more than enough considering my current bodyweight. Adding even more protein will only bring other negative side effects with my intestines - namely protein farts. And I really don't know what is worse. Feeling full all the time or constant protein farts...

I planned on adding protein later though when I've gained a few kilos but for now I wanted to bulk with increasing carbs exclusively. I generally eat extremely low fat almost all the time by the way. Usually it's just 2 small spoons of peanut butter a day and whatever there is in my low-fat cottage cheese.

Like I said, I'm generally extremely pleased with my diet. I always go by the rule of my skin being the picture of how healthy my diet is. And let me tell you that ever since I started this diet my skin is baby-soft and clean. I'm really anal about my skin because I've been having issues with it all my life and getting it this clean is something I'm incredibly proud of. This goes as far that every time I add something new I will check my body for any acne the next few days and if I see some will exclude whatever I added right away.

So please don't take it the wrong way if I'm a bit hesitant to follow any advice telling me to change my diet drastically. Really appreciate your input though as you seem to know what you're talking about. I will try to incorporate it slowly into my diet. :messenger_fistbump:
 

Tesseract

Crushed by Thanos
Dec 7, 2008
36,314
9,302
1,340
OH HELL NO

my fucking rowing machine busted, i need new cords

i dunno what to do with my rage
 
Last edited:
D

Deleted member 752119

Unconfirmed Member
Just to clarify... I do not eat sugar or sweets and haven't been eating them for months. I will add one piece of sweet this weekend though. Meaning, I'll eat a Magnum icecream or small chocolate bar a week. Literally all I want to do now is to replace some of my complex carbs with simpler carbs. Not because of the taste or anything but I just can't stand it being full any more and it is not possible for me to bulk this way. I just can't. So all I want to do now is to instead of making my bread with 400g of wholemeal flour to use mixed bread with 200 g of white flour and 200 g of wholemeal flour. Same with the rice. Instead of 100 g of brown rice, 50 g of white rice and 50 g of brown rice. And instead of 100 g of oats in the morning, 50 g of oat and 50 g of cornflakes. That's it. And then slowly increase the low fibre carb while keeping the high fibre carbs the same.

It's not about me wanting to stuff myself with sweets. The ship where I even care about the taste of my food has long sailed. Hell, I eat raw Tofu after my training. I just want to make it easier to digest the food and I really want to avoid doing keto because I'm almost veggi (I only eat meat once a month) and happy with it. Actually, I'm happy with everything. My looks, my progress, name it. I just want to slowly gain some weight without feeling full of the fucking time. And with my current high carb diet this is.... not... possible. And this from someone who is 83 kg and 1,95m height. What the actual fuck?!
That is probably ok since you note watching how your body responds closely in your next post.

The risk of too many simple carb calories when trying to gain muscle is 1) You may build a smidge slower as it's less nutrient dense than complex carbs and 2) you'll almost definitely put on more fat than if sticking with complex carbs so you have more work to do when you get to a cutting phase.

But yeah, being full all the time sucks. I gave up trying to bulk up years ago. I did it for like 3 years and got from 135lbs to 165 at my most fit, but I have a high metabolism so I was eating a ton and full all the time. But that's body building if wanting to put on significant muscle. I decided it wasn't for me and just focused on eating clean and staying lean. Until my later 30s when I fell off the wagon and put on some midsection fat and now sit around 175ish at age 40 when I should be more 150-155. I'm working on it though, cutting back on beer/wine is the hardest part as the wife and I drank way to much the past couple of years and have some mild, functional alcoholism to cut back from.
 

triplestation

Member
Dec 23, 2008
21,506
2,545
1,270
NYC
yesterday i i pumped the fury of hell into my chest, back and shoulders, it was so fun

water tastes so fucking sweet when you've earned it

went home and i ate rice with spicy chicken and veg and downed it with ice cold pineapple juice in the summer

imagine busting nuts for a good 10 minutes straight

all that shit raced into my muscle fibers and i feel it emanating

today is cardio with a good chance of a thunderstorm

i welcome the summer rain