Open source software or paid software?

Shad0w59

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May 18, 2018
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In my experience, you can put open source software in one of these categories:

1 - Does the job and comparable to paid software in terms of UI, features. Paid product can be seen as optional.

7zip vs WinRAR

2 - amazing, the best software in it's category:

VLC
OBS Studio
Visual Studio Code/Atom

3 - adequate, paid software is a massive upgrade in terms of features

GIMP vs Photoshop/Illustrator
Shotcut vs Premiere
Audacity vs Audition

Of course there is also unique open source software which is absolute trash and software that can't be found as a paid product.
 

JuiceboxHero

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Feb 16, 2014
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In my experience, you can put open source software in one of these categories:

1 - Does the job and comparable to paid software in terms of UI, features. Paid product can be seen as optional.

7zip vs WinRAR

2 - amazing, the best software in it's category:

VLC
OBS Studio
Visual Studio Code/Atom

3 - adequate, paid software is a massive upgrade in terms of features

GIMP vs Photoshop/Illustrator
Shotcut vs Premiere
Audacity vs Audition

Of course there is also unique open source software which is absolute trash and software that can't be found as a paid product.
This honestly sums it up really well but to add on to the list from a game development perspective.. just off the top of my head Blender < Maya/3DS Max. Don't get me wrong, Blender is great and all but the support in virtually every engine I have ever worked in has always been for 3DS Max and Maya.

Then before they went open source you had the Unreal Engine and CryENGINE/Lumberyard. I don't know anyone who has used the Source engine recently other than when Titanfall used it. People do use Unity, but I don't see many using RPG Maker anymore as a result. Unity 2D has done a really good job capturing that market. Not many people using ID Tech these days and of course you have other in house engines that are exactly that - in house. Frostbite mainly (if not exclusively used) by EA, then you have the engine used for R* games, etc.

There are other engines but, I mean really, not many people really using them these days.
 
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Mihos

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Outside of what work pays for, I think I have only paid for Microsoft Studio, Pinegrow, and of course games.

I spend about 50% of my time in Linux, so using Open Office, Gimp, PyCharm, Blender, Fusion360 (personal license), etc is more convenient.
 
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Mr Nash

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I use VLC for media and LibreOffice has been a decent substitute for MS Office for what I need the software for. Also use Gimp a fair bit for image editing. Starting to shift a lot more toward open source as it's perfectly serviceable for what I need it for and it gets me away from all the offerings that have been shifting toward software as a service the last few years.
 
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JuiceboxHero

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Feb 16, 2014
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I use VLC for media and LibreOffice has been a decent substitute for MS Office for what I need the software for. Also use Gimp a fair bit for image editing. Starting to shift a lot more toward open source as it's perfectly serviceable for what I need it for and it gets me away from all the offerings that have been shifting toward software as a service the last few years.
I would make LibreOffice my primary office suite if I could, but my company provides Office for me so I just use that.. though I just found out that Excel doesn't save data field identifier for CSV files so I use LibreOffice for that at least.

Name,Address,"Phone Number"
"James John","123 Test Lane, San Diego, California 99999",1234567890

It's stupid because PowerShell exports CSV's with data identifiers, but Excel doesn't. So if you make changes in Excel and save, it REMOVES THE DATA IDENTIFIERS! So. Fucking. Stupid!
 
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Shifty.

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Some of the buggiest programs I've ever used are paid, 'professional'-tier software.

And some of the least-polished programs I've ever used are free and open-source.

Naturally there are exceptions, but in a general sense, pick your poison ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Or spend life custom-engineering your own solutions to everything :goog_geek:
 
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bati

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Dec 2, 2014
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That's something that's determined on a case by case basis. I used to work as a Linux sysadmin on a project that involved integration of different oss into a unified turnkey IT solution for small and medium business and every single day I gained new appreciation for properly documented and supported software. Which most of the shit I was tasked with implementing, wasn't.

It really gave me new insight into why companies spend obscene amounts on software licenses just to be able to pick up the phone and ask the tech support for a solution or a patch.

Because believe me, you better be the only person in a 50m radius when the only tangentially related answer to the question that's been bugging you for the past week is on some obscure archived mailing list from 2004, and it's not even a complete answer because the guy who figured it out wrote 'nvm solved it'.

Bleeding edge OSS, not even once.
 
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