Programming |OT| C is better than C++! No, C++ is better than C

Mar 26, 2011
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Hey guys I need some informations for programming a website. I'm kind of planning to open a company/a start up. I know some basic HTML from back in the days. Have some experience in VBA so I'm not completely new in programming. Bust

What programming languages are modern website based on?
How much time and how hard is it to program a website with mobile design as well. (That's subjective I know but ~ would be nice)

The page does have to have some links and content. No log in or stuff like that. Just pure information. Some 'modern age' optics. And yeah nice clean design. That's about it.

Are there any alternatives, beside hiring a professional.
 
Jun 2, 2007
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It seems like there's a new framework-du-jour every 6 months, but I think Angular 2+ and React are what the kids are doing these days. If you're talking about a web server, you can pretty much use whatever you want but ASP.NET (using C#) is a common one.
 
Mar 26, 2011
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Well it's basically a website that's well.. kinda showing what we have to offer. I'm not selling anything on it.. it's not a webshop.

Just information for the services we offer. Like you know who we are, what the product is, what we offer, general terms and condictions and stuff like that with a somewhat nice design.. If it's doing well, we're gonna hire a professional IT-guy or something like that, who's gonna build a new one from ground up or who's gonna refresh the website I'm (going to?) build.

@ Neatmachine .. I didn't even understood that you're talking with me xD Are angular 2+ and react coding languages like c++/VBA..? I thought most websites are build with html/css/java? or am I wrong? I'm gonna go to codeacademy as well and look for some information/courses.
 

Zoe

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Jan 3, 2007
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The thing is, there's no need to reinvent the wheel. If you're not looking for any special functionality out of the website and you're not already adept at modern web pages, just get a CMS. A lot of companies are moving in that direction for their own products.
 
Mar 26, 2011
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The thing is, there's no need to reinvent the wheel. If you're not looking for any special functionality out of the website and you're not already adept at modern web pages, just get a CMS. A lot of companies are moving in that direction for their own products.
I'm not trying to reinvent it. I just thought that it's the proper way to build a website.
Can you recommend one? I assume CMS means content management system.
 
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Jan 21, 2018
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So, I'm 30 years old and I'm constantly told by a friend of mine who started to learn programming at 32 (and 4 years later he works with a nice salary and all) that I should learn it.

I have not studied for 14 years and I'm incredibly rusty in that regard, but the question is: how difficult is to learn programming?
 
Jun 2, 2007
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So, I'm 30 years old and I'm constantly told by a friend of mine who started to learn programming at 32 (and 4 years later he works with a nice salary and all) that I should learn it.

I have not studied for 14 years and I'm incredibly rusty in that regard, but the question is: how difficult is to learn programming?
I think the skills required are on some gradient between:
(Incredibly Smart + Persistent) <-> (Smart + Incredibly Persistent)

Best thing to do in my opinion would be to follow a tutorial or two in a "lower level" language like C and then find some random toy projects to do on your own. There are plenty of resources online. Whatever you do, be sure to work along with any lessons or tutorials you find.
 
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Likes: Jon Neu
Jan 21, 2018
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I think the skills required are on some gradient between:
(Incredibly Smart + Persistent) <-> (Smart + Incredibly Persistent)

Best thing to do in my opinion would be to follow a tutorial or two in a "lower level" language like C and then find some random toy projects to do on your own. There are plenty of resources online. Whatever you do, be sure to work along with any lessons or tutorials you find.
But how difficult is to actually learn a programming language? It's like learning a foreign language? Easier? Harder?

I guess you have to be smart and persistent to learn to applicate that language in the resolution of problems, but how difficult is to actually learn the language?
 
Jun 2, 2007
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But how difficult is to actually learn a programming language? It's like learning a foreign language? Easier? Harder?

I guess you have to be smart and persistent to learn to applicate that language in the resolution of problems, but how difficult is to actually learn the language?
Learning a programming language is fairly trivial...once you know how to program. That's especially true if you learn something like C first. The hard part is learning how to program.

Edit: For reference, it might take a week or two to become comfortable with a new programming language. Programming in general, I doubt I personally could have learned outside of school (which took place over four years). After about six years of programming regularly at school and then at work, I finally feel somewhat confident in my ability to solve whatever problem I encounter. I guess after 6 months or so you could have enough knowledge to be of value to an employer? People who are self-taught would probably be able to answer that better. Either way, it's definitely worth it if you're capable and there's really only one way to find out.
 
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Likes: Jon Neu
Jan 21, 2018
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Use Ruby on Rails its very easy to use because its commands are near to our daily communications
I will try it, thanks!

I have another question: it's important to be able to be fast at mechanography? I can't write fast, I use primarily 3 or 4 fingers to write with my keyboard.

Is that really important or it's something it can be overcome if you want to be a programmer?
 
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Jun 2, 2007
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I will try it, thanks!

I have another question: it's important to be able to be fast at mechanography? I can't write fast, I use primarily 3 or 4 fingers to write with my keyboard.

Is that really important or it's something it can be overcome if you want to be a programmer?
It's definitely important to be able to type at a decent pace, but if you're practicing programming for a while you'll be typing quickly before you're programming decently ;)

Just keep your fingers in the right place (look online) so you're typing correctly and be diligent about it. Your typing speed will improve naturally over time.
 
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Likes: Jon Neu
Jan 31, 2018
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@ Neatmachine .. I didn't even understood that you're talking with me xD Are angular 2+ and react coding languages like c++/VBA..? I thought most websites are build with html/css/java? or am I wrong? I'm gonna go to codeacademy as well and look for some information/courses.
Java Script you mean? I also now websites use ruby and php.
Anyway. In my company a colleague from web department has taught us HTML+CSS for a couple of month. But now most of the people refused to study due to they don't have enough time. So she stopped the lessons. I'd like to continue studying myself, but non't know were to look.
 
Dec 14, 2008
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Java Script you mean? I also now websites use ruby and php.
Anyway. In my company a colleague from web department has taught us HTML+CSS for a couple of month. But now most of the people refused to study due to they don't have enough time. So she stopped the lessons. I'd like to continue studying myself, but non't know were to look.
HTML and CSS resources? I've yet to buy it myself, but I've heard great things about this Udemy course; I have his JS course on Udemy and it's good stuff. Or if you're looking for a book, Jon Duckett's HTML and CSS book is supposed to be good. If you strictly want free stuff, EJ Media, DevTips, Traversy Media and LearnWebCode are great.

FreeCodeCamp.org is good for practice and projects.

Also, there's no reason to spend more than $10 on udemy courses, as there are always coupon codes to get any course for $10. Just google it. The current code is FYY1201.

Edit, also: https://learn.shayhowe.com/html-css/
 
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Jan 31, 2018
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HTML and CSS resources? I've yet to buy it myself, but I've heard great things about this Udemy course; I have his JS course on Udemy and it's good stuff. Or if you're looking for a book, Jon Duckett's HTML and CSS book is supposed to be good. If you strictly want free stuff, EJ Media, DevTips, Traversy Media and LearnWebCode are great.

FreeCodeCamp.org is good for practice and projects.

Also, there's no reason to spend more than $10 on udemy courses, as there are always coupon codes to get any course for $10. Just google it. The current code is FYY1201.

Edit, also: https://learn.shayhowe.com/html-css/
Yep, i needed recomendations because there are too mane different courses, sites etc. Just too difficult to choose. Thank's.
 
Dec 28, 2006
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Here's something I've been thinking about lately.

Conventions for naming of tests. There seems to be different preferred styles depending on language/community.

I came across this article which I found points out the main popular ones.
https://dzone.com/articles/7-popular-unit-test-naming

I'm quite partial with number 3 from the list above coming from Python land where that seems to be the norm. In Java world it doesn't seem to be as popular so I'm trying to find a good cross language consensus.
 
Jun 20, 2018
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Here's something I've been thinking about lately.

Conventions for naming of tests. There seems to be different preferred styles depending on language/community.

I came across this article which I found points out the main popular ones.
https://dzone.com/articles/7-popular-unit-test-naming

I'm quite partial with number 3 from the list above coming from Python land where that seems to be the norm. In Java world it doesn't seem to be as popular so I'm trying to find a good cross language consensus.
I use number 5 but with camel case instead of underscore. Java here.
 
Likes: Ryujin
May 4, 2005
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www.gaming-universe.de
What math should I be learning for 2d game programming? I've heard Trigonometry, but I know there has to be other kinds as well.
I think it is important to say what kinds of 2D game programming you are looking for. Some games are more algorithmical (e.g. an SRPG), others require more of geometry and physics (e.g. platformers).
 
Likes: kevm3
Dec 28, 2006
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Trigonometry, physics, set theory, graphs, path finding (all of these are quite a large set of fields, lots of algorithms and various levels of complexity from very simple basic understanding to formal mathematical proofs. You likely won't need to know it to the deepest level to be able to use it though but it can seem intimidating depending on your current mathematical level/ability/understaning/knowledge if you are just jumping in. Main thing to keep in mind is patience, it is a marathon, not a sprint and you don't need to be an expert in everything here.).

Generally anything with vectors is a good idea, normalization etc... (probably covered in Physics/Trig??)

Knowing about radians, degrees, slope of a line, distance between two points, angles, waves (sine waves etc... can be handy) are all pretty helpful for games in different scenarios.

I guess for AI learning about finite state machines can be useful but it's easy to get bogged down in terminology theory so find someone/some source that can break it down and make it easy to understand.
 
Likes: kevm3