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Sharc - Do you need it? You might? What is it?

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Hawk269

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Aug 22, 2005
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You may be asking...what the hell is a Sharc? Well, this little device can possibly save you thousands of dollars, especially as we approach the next Gen consoles and newer GPU's.

Sharc in short is a device that allows you to use an older Audio Receiver that does not have eArc or shaky eArc support to allow the pass through of Dolby Atmos and other formats without audio delay but also allow you to use your TV's features such as a LG C9 or CX series TV.

I personally own a LG C9 TV, 2017 High End Denon x6400h receiver and a 7.2.2 Atmos set up. My issues was that Denon does not have a fully supported eARc on the receiver and depending on what devices you have connected to it, it does not play well. For my situation, I have a Xbox One X which uses VRR and a gaming PC. My TV (C9) supports both VRR and G-Sync but only if the Xbox X or PC is connected directly to the TV. Right now there are only a few AV Receivers that have HDMI 2.1 and those that do have them it is only one HDMI port that is HDMI 2.1. With my set up if I wanted to have VRR working, I could not have Dolby Atmos as well since it introduced horrible audio delay that could not be defeated. On the PC if I wanted to have G-Sync I could not have Atmos as well. While some older AV Receivers that did get a eArc firmware do play nice with the LG and other TV's, not all do and many have high end AV gear that only have Arc. This is where the Sharc comes in.


Sharc is a eArc Audio Converter which add's eArc to your current audio system. The device is a small box that you connect one HDMI cable from the Sharc to the TV's eArc/Arc HDMI port and the other to the Sharc. You then run a HDMI cord from the other Sharc HDMI port to whatever HDMI input on your AV Receiver. For power, it uses a mini USB cable that you connect from the TV. That is it. It just works.

For me, this means that I can now have my Xbox One X connected to the LG C9 directly and still get VRR and ALLM but now also enjoy Dolby Atmos without Audio Delay. On my PC I can now utilize G-Sync and still get Dolby Atmos. The great thing about this little box is that even if your Audio Receiver does not have eArc this device goes between the Receiver and TV and add's eArc.

As we approach the next gen systems, which will have HDMI 2.1 and VRR, if you have a older receiver there is no need to go out and buy new one for HDMI 2.1 and since all the ones that do exist only have one HDMI 2,1 port on them. I have talked with people that have 10+ year old high end Receivers that have used this device to get around the limitations of the receiver and still get the great audio from them but also have the benefits of newer TV's that have VRR and G-Sync.

If you have any questions don't hesitate to ask. Prior to finding this device I was already looking into a new receiver and the ones I was finding were anywhere from $1500 - $3500 and with this little box I don't need to even think of making that investment. My current receiver is pretty high end that I bought 3 years ago and now I can continue to use it and have all the benefits that my TV provides!
 
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