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Souls veterans: What's your final assessment of Sekiro?

Souls veterans, what is your final assessment of Sekiro?

  • It was great.

    Votes: 159 59.1%
  • It wasn't for me.

    Votes: 56 20.8%
  • I'm kinda in the middle.

    Votes: 54 20.1%

  • Total voters
    269

GAMETA

Banned
Jun 3, 2014
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I think the lack of variety in combat hurt the game too much.

There's no work-around, you either play the game the way the game wants to be played or you don't, and that's a problem to me, because it ultimately felt like I was being punished for not pressing the same button at the right time over and over... not for making a mistake or for not trying something different, it felt almost like a QTE system.

That's the cool thing about DS, you can defeat the same boss with different strategies, builds, styles, you can try different things, you can be aggressive or defensive... not in Sekiro, every boss dies by its posture and by its posture only, it's a pain in the ass.
 

Captain Toad

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Dec 1, 2020
1,971
5,099
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Sekiro’s combat shits on Souls games from a great height. The parry-to-punish mechanic is incredibly satisfying and never gets old. You feel like an absolute badass downing some of the mid-to-late game bosses.

Speak for yourself. On the end boss I felt more like, "Fuuuck fuck fuck fuck fuck. This is getting fucking stupid. You piece of fucking shit end boss."

And when I finally won, I didn't really feel like a badass. It was more like, "yay, end boss- 73, me - 1. Thank goodness I dont have to do that shit again".
 
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Azelover

Titanic was called the Ship of Dreams, and it was. It really was.
Dec 3, 2004
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It's great. However, it is a hair too difficult.
 

Reckheim

Member
Feb 24, 2015
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Just platinumed it a couple of days ago. Somewhere in the middle of the pack of all the souls games.

I do have to say the difficulty is a bit overrated. Its not easy, but once you get the timing right, it becomes fairly easy compared to some of the harder bosses in Dark Souls 3.
 

Paasei

Member
May 15, 2014
1,360
640
585
Great game, especially the combat. Still not as good as Bloodborne for me, though.
 

Rex_DX

Member
Jan 8, 2016
473
575
495
Combat was extremely tight and enjoyable. Very fair. In a game this punishing, it's important to never feel like you got robbed by bs hit boxes or other mechanics and Sekiro delivered a much tighter experience than any Souls game.

That said, I played the hell out of it at launch and never went back after about 100 hours.

Dark Souls 2 keeps me coming back once a year due to the extremely diverse pvp options and build variety.

Sekiro was a great linear action game but it's replayability for me isn't there.

I enjoy FROM games for the RPG and build mechanics, not rythm-game style combat. I like playing a Souls game and knowing this is just "another run" among many.
 

Northeastmonk

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Mar 18, 2013
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My first playthrough was amazing. The 2nd time things felt a bit too familiar. I’ve finished each Souls game more than 2 times, probably 3 or 4 for some of them. That’s usually from the beginning to the final boss. Sekiro I have 1 solid playthrough to the end and a bit of NG+ completed. It’s good except the variety in weapons doesn’t call me back in for a 2nd or 3rd playthrough. I also think Dark Souls 2 is a very good game especially with the SotFS additions. It’s a lot like I feel about the very first NiOh. Excellent execution, but replayability depends on rather or not you want to sit through the long journey again. I like Dark Souls III a lot because of the world building. There are some parts of Sekiro and NiOh 1 that doesn’t grab at my imaginary museum of fantasy worlds. They’re wonderful worlds to visit, but something from Dark Souls 1-3 or Bloodborne calls out for my attention. There’s a lot of world building and story telling to Bloodborne. It has this whole church cult gone horribly wrong feeling to it. Sekiro has a very good way of hyping up a boss battle. Sekiro can feel good and it can also make you feel complete in some ways. NiOh 2 I thought fixed a lot of my issues with NiOh 1 completely. They feel like two different games. Lol I’m thinking about a Sekiro 2. Sekiro may be something I’m really excited to go back to years from now.

Im just talking about From Software’s library. If I stacked up all the games after finishing them Sekiro would probably be middle of my favorites. I see the different changes in the genres that they make. You can’t exactly talk about From Software without mentioning Sekiro either. I wouldn’t have skipped Sekiro because it was a one of a kind experience. It makes me even more excited for Elden Ring.
 
Last edited:

stn

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Jun 15, 2012
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I love it but I do miss the ability to upgrade gear that is present in the other games.
 

Ahjumbie

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Mar 26, 2013
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Sekiro is great but it was like a one and done for me . With the souls/bloodborne games before I even finished a playthrough I was already thinking what build should I do for the next playthrough . After beating Sekiro it was like okaythanksfromsoftforagreatgamebyebye! Not that I'll never play it again but om not chomping at the bit to do so
 
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Feb 24, 2018
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My least favorite Souls title. A lot of it has to do with my skill level preventing me from being able to enjoy it. Game just shredded my nerves and I never finished it. At least with the other Souls game I could grind levels or summon help. It's my fault, but the impression is what it is.
 
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Concern

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Sep 20, 2020
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Need to finish it. It was hard af. At least now I'll get to try it on the xsx.
 

Ceadeus

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Part of the fun for me in the last couple of FromSoftware games were to level up and find loot by exploring. But the main reason I couldn't finish this title is because of the precision in combat the game requires and the input lag generated by the 30fps only option on console version.

I just can't stand it and lost my patience to the point I wouldn't care anymore. If a developer want to go full action adventure for a game that requires skills and timing, their focus should be to make the game responssive AF. It's no coincidence why Ninja Gaiden is still as today, the golden standard for action combat adventure games. I want to get good fighting the ennemies, not the deficient controls.
 
Last edited:
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Dec 2, 2018
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I'd put it above DS2 and DS3 overall, but below the other three games. It's a fun, focused game that doesn't aim as high as some of the others. Absolutely the hardest game in the series though - a lot of my friends couldn't beat it.
 

Omeggos

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Jan 12, 2018
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Amazing game. The combat is solid but it does feel like a different game overall (like comparing dark souls to tenchu z) But it’s probably not in my top three FROM games.

1. bloodborne
2. Dark souls
3. Dark souls 3
4. Sekiro
5. Demon souls: RE
6. Dark souls 2 SotFS
 

Kacho

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Feb 22, 2011
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Speak for yourself. On the end boss I felt more like, "Fuuuck fuck fuck fuck fuck. This is getting fucking stupid. You piece of fucking shit end boss."
That fight was incredible. It puts everything you learned to the test and wasn’t all that hard when you learned his patterns and parry timing.
 

Danjin44

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LOVED it!!! I'm much more of melee fighter and Sekiro give me the most satisfying melee combat in any FROM games.
 

Hostile_18

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What a roller coaster I had with this game. I was so frustrated at the beginning and took about 4 trys to get "into it".

My final conclusion is that it's a great game but they pushed the difficulty too far... at least for my skill set. Not as good as some but had enough skill to beat all the Soulsborne games.

The recent patches have made it more Souls like too, before anyone says it's not a soulsborne game 😛
 

R6Rider

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I haven't played Sekiro yet, but I have a gut feeling that I won't like it that much. It's missing what makes me really enjoy the Souls games.
 

ClanOfNone

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Nov 24, 2018
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I've beaten all three Dark Souls and Bloodborne (STILL waiting on a ps5 for Demon's), but Sekiro was too tough for my old fogey reflexes. I found it more frustrating than challenging, and I found myself wanting more weapon/build variety.
Looked and played amazing, but it just wasn't my cup of tea. Hoping Elden Ring scratches the Souls itch better.
 
Nov 7, 2020
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Hard as fuck. Preferred the "regular" souls games with more weapons/armor but I still love Sekiro. Maybe I'll even beat it someday.

episode 4 abc GIF by The Bachelor
 

Danjin44

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before anyone says it's not a soulsborne game
Because its not, Catherine has some elements from Persona series but its not Persona game and its same story with Sekiro. Sekiro is an action, is not trying be RPG like pervious FROM games.
 
Last edited:

Plantoid

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Combat is worse than souls, but I liked the vertical aspect of the game, also, it's missing weapons.. give me more variety to keep the game fresh going into ng+
 
Jul 9, 2020
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Sekiro feels like a game that was made for me. It's fucking awesome and I loved every second of it... Although I did get incredibly frustrated with a boss or two (Guardian Ape + Wife comes to mind).

I was getting a little burnt out on Souls titles before Sekiro (I've played all of them). In terms of gameplay, Bloodborne was a breath of fresh air and Sekiro kicked things up to 11. However, the similarities that Sekiro shares with the Souls titles are very superficial. It really doesn't make sense to compare them because they aim to accomplish different things with their gameplay. For the sake of the argument though, I'll be making a couple of comparisons in my post.

Sekiro is an action/rhythm game through and through. A lot of the RPG mechanics and build variety from the Souls titles were stripped away to hone in on Sekiro's hyper-focused gameplay. With that in mind, playing with different prosthetic tool loadouts + combat arts + ninjutsu actually does give you something similar to the build variety; making strategic, deliberate use of your arsenal of weapons allows you to build unique combos that flow seamlessly with the combat. Basically, build variety has been replaced with combo building. You could argue that just focusing on deflections + buffs is the most efficient way to kill an enemy, but making combat look stylish is a large part of what makes Sekiro so fun.

A dedicated game to dex builds with accessible narration and a jump button. Loved it.
This quote really speaks to me. My first build in any Souls title is purely dexterity focused. You'll be hard-pressed to find me wielding anything other than the Uchigatana. The typical slow, methodical gameplay of most builds (tanks, magic, etc.) in Souls titles was never my cup of tea. Because of my consistent adoption of dex + bleed builds, transitioning into Bloodborne felt very natural, considering that the game is focused on aggression, visceral attacks, exploiting the rally system, and precise step-dodges. Parrying is also a favorite mechanic of mine in Souls titles (and its ridiculously OP if you can pull it off consistently). With Sekiro, making the mental adjustment of swapping out the timing of i-frames of dodge-rolls for clicking the deflect/block button was genius. Sekiro literally combined two of my most used gameplay mechanics (well-timed dodge-rolls and parrying) into one (deflection). I'll also add that the sound effect for the deathblow is so damn satisfying to hear and never gets old.

Bosses are also a highlight of Sekiro. Many of my favorite bosses of all time are just in this game (Sword Saint Isshin, True Monk, Owl (Father)). The combat of Sekiro has a large impact on the boss design and the flow of clashing blades along with graceful dodging feels amazing. In Soulsborne titles, it feels like you chip at a boss' health bar and dodge-roll your way to victory; in Sekiro, it feels like you've really bested your opponent once you've beat them. There is a large emphasis on putting constant pressure on your opponent's posture bar or crippling posture recovery. You can end most fights within a minute or two if you really know what you're doing... even if more than half of the opponent's health bar remains. My one nitpick with bosses is that they are re-used pretty heavily.

The stealth mechanics are okay and are really only there to help you pick off a crowd so that you focus on one-on-one combat without being overwhelmed. I had hoped that more emphasis would be placed on stealth, but you can't have everything I guess. I will say that usage of stealth can help quite a bit with mini-bosses.

I really like the OST for Sekiro. There were fewer tracks than Soulsborne titles for sure, but it was nice to hear something other than the bombastic orchestras + choirs from the Souls series for a change. Don't get me wrong - I love Soulsborne music, but the notably different tones and instruments that Sekiro brought to the table are very much appreciated. Here are couple of tracks that I really enjoy:

The length of the game was also perfect for quick playthroughs. Sure, the first playthrough is longest because you're still learning the movesets of enemies. The second playthrough, however, is like an insane power-trip as you blow through enemies that gave you so much trouble the first time around. It's quite amazing being able to witness firsthand how much you've grown as a player. For subsequent playthroughs, I like restricting myself to certain prosthetic tool loadouts, combat arts, and going charmless + demon bell if I'm really feeling up to the challenge.

The level design and the addition of the grappling hook makes traversal a blast. I miss the labyrinthian layouts of the Souls series, but flying through levels almost like a platformer is pretty fun. While the environmental storytelling and attention to detail is still there, the world is less interesting to explore than Soulsborne titles. Truth be told, I felt like world-building was lot more restricted this time around considering that FromSoftware had to work with preestablished mythology and history. With Soulsborne titles, Miyazaki had complete creative freedom to craft his world and add in interesting lore, narratives, etc. This aspect makes me very excited for Elden Ring.

Seriously, if you dedicate enough time to mastering the combat system in Sekiro then combat can look downright beautiful:
 
Last edited:
Aug 28, 2019
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One day I might actually beat it and then maybe give a final assessment but right now I really don't care for it as much as the rest of the Souls games, it's too rhythm based, too punishing and the theme/aesthetic is less interesting. It also nearly completely removes the RPG elements of other Souls games.
 
Apr 4, 2020
241
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I think the lack of variety in combat hurt the game too much.

There's no work-around, you either play the game the way the game wants to be played or you don't, and that's a problem to me, because it ultimately felt like I was being punished for not pressing the same button at the right time over and over... not for making a mistake or for not trying something different, it felt almost like a QTE system.

That's the cool thing about DS, you can defeat the same boss with different strategies, builds, styles, you can try different things, you can be aggressive or defensive... not in Sekiro, every boss dies by its posture and by its posture only, it's a pain in the ass.

I think this worded my problems with the game well, the lack of variaty. With every boss I gave it a couple of tries and then fired up the youtube turorial for that boss, as there was more or less one path to victory it felt like a waste of time to find that out myself. The fact that there were no cool weapon unlocks or any other real progression made me stop somewhere after the second big monkey.
 
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DunDunDunpachi

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I think the lack of variety in combat hurt the game too much.

There's no work-around, you either play the game the way the game wants to be played or you don't, and that's a problem to me, because it ultimately felt like I was being punished for not pressing the same button at the right time over and over... not for making a mistake or for not trying something different, it felt almost like a QTE system.

That's the cool thing about DS, you can defeat the same boss with different strategies, builds, styles, you can try different things, you can be aggressive or defensive... not in Sekiro, every boss dies by its posture and by its posture only, it's a pain in the ass.
Where's the combat variety lacking? The only glaring one is that you're only using a sword and a handful of side-tools. But enemy AI / attack patterns have never been better in any previous Soulsborne title than they are in Sekiro. There are midbosses in Sekiro that have more attack variety than genuine Souls bosses. The Sekiro bosses themselves make fights like King Alant and Smough and Ornstein look simple, mechanically. Since nearly every move can be countered or evaded, there are countless ways to tackle each fight, with or without tools. Complaining about the posture bar is nonsensical. Should I gripe that all Soulsborne bosses are the same because they all have to reach 0 HP before they're defeated? The posture bar / health bar gives the player more flexibility, not less, since you can chip away, or go for counters, or some mix of that in order to bring the boss down. All of this is at your fingertips instead of having to stick with one rigid approach or the other (because you dumped stats into a magic build, or a strength build, or what have you).

I booted up a playthrough of Bloodborne after beating Sekiro for the second time (this was a few months ago), and BB bosses felt more one-dimensional in comparison. They felt a lot easier to cheese, though Sekiro also gives the player 100 different flavors of exploitable cheese against enemies and bosses.

For those who love the RPG aspects of Souls, Sekiro is barely a cousin of the same franchise. Sekiro is mostly an action game. Fans complained about BB's watered-down RPG elements, too, and I can respect those who prefer their Souls games to be more on the RPG side.

I always loved Souls for the action itself. Yeah, fiddling with the stats is fun, but learning the simple-but-brutal combat systems was the best part for me. Bloodborne became my favorite because of the combat, and I think I can safely say Sekiro is my new favorite because the combat is refined beyond even what BB accomplished.
 
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Hostile_18

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Because its not, Catherine has some elements from Persona series but its not Persona game and its same story with Sekiro. Sekiro is an action, is not trying be RPG like pervious FROM games.

Theres so, so many similarities. Even more so after the recent patch. Sure theres a few differences but only in the same way Bloodborne is different to Dark Souls etc.
 

DunDunDunpachi

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Sekiro feels like a game that was made for me. It's fucking awesome and I loved every second of it... Although I did get incredibly frustrated with a boss or two (Guardian Ape + Wife comes to mind).

I was getting a little burnt out on Souls titles before Sekiro (I've played all of them). In terms of gameplay, Bloodborne was a breath of fresh air and Sekiro kicked things up to 11. However, the similarities that Sekiro shares with the Souls titles are very superficial. It really doesn't make sense to compare them because they aim to accomplish different things with their gameplay. For the sake of the argument though, I'll be making a couple of comparisons in my post.

Sekiro is an action/rhythm game through and through. A lot of the RPG mechanics and build variety from the Souls titles were stripped away to hone in on Sekiro's hyper-focused gameplay. With that in mind, playing with different prosthetic tool loadouts + combat arts + ninjutsu actually does give you something similar to the build variety; making strategic, deliberate use of your arsenal of weapons allows you to build unique combos that flow seamlessly with the combat. Basically, build variety has been replaced with combo building. You could argue that just focusing on deflections + buffs is the most efficient way to kill an enemy, but making combat look stylish is a large part of what makes Sekiro so fun.


This quote really speaks to me. My first build in any Souls title is purely dexterity focused. You'll be hard-pressed to find me wielding anything other than an Uchigatana. The typical slow, methodical gameplay of most builds (tanks, magic, etc.) in Souls titles was never my cup of tea. Because of my consistent adoption of dex + bleed builds, transitioning into Bloodborne felt very natural, considering that the game is focused on aggression, visceral attacks, exploiting the rally system, and well-timed step-dodges. Parrying is also a favorite mechanic of mine in Souls titles (and its ridiculously OP if you can pull it off consistently). With Sekiro, making the mental adjustment of swapping out the timing of i-frames of dodge-rolls for clicking the deflect/block button was fucking genius. Sekiro literally combined two of my most used gameplay mechanics (well-times dodge-rolls and parrying) into one (deflection). I'll also add that the sound effect for the deathblow is so damn satisfying to hear.

Bosses are also a highlight of Sekiro. Many of my favorite bosses of all time are just in this game (Sword Saint Isshin, True Monk, Owl (Father)). The combat of Sekiro has a large impact on the boss design and flow of the clashing blades along with well-timed dodges feels amazing. In Soulsborne titles, it feels like you chip at a boss' health bar and dodge roll your way to victory; in Sekiro, it feels like you've really bested your opponent once you've beat them. There is a large emphasis on putting constant pressure on your opponent's posture bar or crippling posture recovery. You can end most fights within a minute or two if you really know what you're doing... even if more than half of the opponent's health bar remains. My one nitpick with bosses is that they are re-used pretty heavily.

The stealth mechanics are okay and are really only there to help you pick off a crowd so that you focus on one-on-one combat without being overwhelmed. I had hoped that more emphasis would be placed on stealth, but you can't have everything I guess. I will say that usage of stealth can help quite a bit with mini-bosses.

I really like the OST for Sekiro. There were fewer tracks than Soulsborne titles for sure, but it was nice to hear something other than the bombastic orchestras + choirs from the Souls series for a change. Don't get me wrong - I love Soulsborne music, but the notably different tones and instruments that Sekiro brought to the table are very much appreciated. Here are couple of tracks that I really enjoy:

The length of the game was also perfect for a quick playthroughs. Sure, the first playthrough is longest because you're still learning the movesets of enemies. The second playthrough, however, is like an insane power-trip as you blow through enemies that gave you so much trouble the first time around. It's quite amazing being able to witness firsthand how much you've grown as a player. For subsequent playthroughs, I like restricting myself to certain prosthetic tool loadouts, combat arts, and going charmless + demon bell if I'm really feeling up to the challenge.

The level design and the addition of the grappling hook makes traversal a blast. I miss the labyrinthian layouts of the Souls series, but flying through levels almost like a platformer is pretty fun. While the environmental storytelling and attention to detail is still there, the world is less interesting to explore than Soulsborne titles. Truth be told, I felt like world-building was lot more restricted this time around for FromSoftware considering that they had to work with preestablished mythology and history. With Soulsborne titles, Miyazaki had complete creative freedom to craft his world and add in interesting lore, narratives, etc. This aspect makes me very excited for Elden Ring.

Lastly, if you dedicate enough time to mastering the combat system in Sekiro then things can look fucking incredible:
Amazing post that echos a lot of my own feelings, especially that bit about how the second playthrough is a victory lap of crushing all the enemies and bosses that gave you a hard time during the first run.
 
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Danjin44

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Theres so, so many similarities. Even more so after the recent patch. Sure theres a few differences but only in the same way Bloodborne is different to Dark Souls etc.
Bloodborne might have different combat system but the structure is still the same and is also very much RPG like Demon's/Dark Souls. Sekiro in other hand is FROM's take on action games, is not Souls and if someone going in to this game exception "souls like" game then they have no one but themselves to blame if they get disappointed.

Just because FROM made RPG in the past it doesn't mean they are not allowed to make different type of game.
 

Omeggos

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Theres so, so many similarities. Even more so after the recent patch. Sure theres a few differences but only in the same way Bloodborne is different to Dark Souls etc.
Bloodborne let’s you upgrade individual weapons and form a different build than the singular build allowed in sekiro. On top of that while the combat in BB is more aggressive and fast paced than the other souls, it still has the usual mix of attack/parry while sekiro is more about breaking the enemy’s posture. The only big things they really have in common is fluidity and a bonfire system (with sekiro taking the gourde aspect from dark souls’ flask system)

it’s an action game vs an action rpg.
 

Umbral

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Sekiro is great, but to approach it as a souls game is a mistake. The same mistake that’s often made when playing Bloodborne for the first time. There are the Souls series and there are From Software games, and they share an essence. Sekiro is very much a From Software game but it is not a Souls-like.

I went into Bloodborne expecting Dark Souls with a different skin and got my ass kicked and was lost for a while. It taught me that they can make all sorts of games, but they all still have that From feel. This was further reinforced when I played Armored Core: For Answer, one of the Miyazaki directed AC games. That From essence is still there in that game.

I’m completely ok with the limited customization and only one weapon (excluding the arm). I love parrying in Souls and Bloodborne, so it was right up my alley. I love that there aren’t stats either. I’ll play games with stats and that sort of crap, but I prefer games that don’t have them. It’s more focused and is easier to balance I’m sure. I don’t get anything from numbers going up, it’s kind of annoying that everything has them now. My favorite way to play Bloodborne is BL4 and only upgrade the weapon. You become better at the game instead of just leveling up to a point where everything becomes easier. As cireza cireza said above, Sekiro is about playing and not fashion and stats. Don’t get pissed at me, I love the vanity stuff too, but I don’t need it to enjoy something.

There are valid criticisms to be made around discovery and mystery, but that’s really only if you approach as if it were Dark Souls in Japan. The game is also very bright a lot of the time, which removes some of the oppressive atmosphere found in Souls.
 

Carna

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It's the only From Software-Souls game I beat! - by cheesing the final boss LOL
 

TeezzyD

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I literally just bought both Sekiro and Nioh.

Ask me in a few months when I get around to playing through both.

Expecting to get my ass handed to me.
 
Nov 13, 2016
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I don't know if Sekiro is my favourite of the bunch, but it's a damn good game, and I appreciate it being its own thing. The Souls formula has become stale after four releases, without much variety between them. That's why Bloodborne and Sekiro stand out from the rest.
 

Ten_Fold

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Worst souls like game, which isn’t bad but I think even DS2 is better. It feels like it lacks replay value as well to me.
 
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North West, UK.
Bloodborne
Dark Souls
Sekiro

If Sekiro had more replay value incentive and more weapon variety it may have been the best of Miyazaki's games.

DS II/III aren't good.
 

GAMETA

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Where's the combat variety lacking? The only glaring one is that you're only using a sword and a handful of side-tools. But enemy AI / attack patterns have never been better in any previous Soulsborne title than they are in Sekiro. There are midbosses in Sekiro that have more attack variety than genuine Souls bosses. The Sekiro bosses themselves make fights like King Alant and Smough and Ornstein look simple, mechanically. Since nearly every move can be countered or evaded, there are countless ways to tackle each fight, with or without tools. Complaining about the posture bar is nonsensical. Should I gripe that all Soulsborne bosses are the same because they all have to reach 0 HP before they're defeated? The posture bar / health bar gives the player more flexibility, not less, since you can chip away, or go for counters, or some mix of that in order to bring the boss down. All of this is at your fingertips instead of having to stick with one rigid approach or the other (because you dumped stats into a magic build, or a strength build, or what have you).

I booted up a playthrough of Bloodborne after beating Sekiro for the second time (this was a few months ago), and BB bosses felt more one-dimensional in comparison. They felt a lot easier to cheese, though Sekiro also gives the player 100 different flavors of exploitable cheese against enemies and bosses.

For those who love the RPG aspects of Souls, Sekiro is barely a cousin of the same franchise. Sekiro is mostly an action game. Fans complained about BB's watered-down RPG elements, too, and I can respect those who prefer their Souls games to be more on the RPG side.

I always loved Souls for the action itself. Yeah, fiddling with the stats is fun, but learning the simple-but-brutal combat systems was the best part for me. Bloodborne became my favorite because of the combat, and I think I can safely say Sekiro is my new favorite because the combat is refined beyond even what BB accomplished.

I finished the game and not a single Boss went down by HP. Posture was everything in Sekiro and raising their posture bar mainly required you to parry or counter (mikiri)... it's a very repetitive system.

DS requires you to attack until the enemy reaches 0 HP, but how you do that is up to you, you're free to approach it the way you see fit. The same is true about BloodBorne, it has less variety but you're still free to tackle combat as you see fit, it makes you want to try again because you can see what you can do differently...

Sekiro felt like a 3D fighting game against someone that uses a broken character and spams the same shit over and over, it's not fun, it's frustrating...
 
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Gods&Monsters

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May 11, 2018
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I hate parrying/riposte/countering. A shitty ninja who blocks everything. The rest was great but I gave up on the game. Zero fun.

Block, block, block. Awful.
 
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mekes

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Jun 30, 2013
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I played Sekiro in the evenings with headphones on whilst my 4 week old son slept in a wicker basket next to me. I wasn’t committing to any games at the time as I felt a little overwhelmed being a new dad during the start of lockdown. I asked my partner to choose a game for me and out of a hundred or so games on the shelf, she chose Sekiro. I had tried playing it at launch but scrapped that plan after failing repeatedly to beat the boss (Juzou the Drunk, maybe?) in Hirata estate. I have a habit of quitting play throughs of From Software games and coming back to them 6-12 months later. But at the time in March this year, it felt like my partner couldn’t have picked a worse game for me.

Well, I completed the game and went on to get the platinum trophy. I ended up really relishing the challenge of the game, I enjoyed it so much that I would say it spoiled gaming for me for the rest of 2020. Nothing I played after Sekiro was as much fun, as interesting or as finely tuned as Sekiro. Everything felt a bit drab and half baked in comparison. Sekiro would probably make it into my top 5 games of last gen. I’m a huge fan of Bloodborne too, and prefer the setting in Bloodborne to Sekiro. But in all honesty, rating the game play, the highs in Sekiro are probably better than the highs in Bloodborne. I feel like From have been on a journey with their combat design and currently it may have peaked with Sekiro.

For me, I think it is one of From Softwares best games. I think, despite being really good, the first 1/5 of the game is the weakest part of the experience. It just felt like it got better and better the more you advanced.
 

AlexEdokkoMX

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Dec 17, 2020
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I loved the game (I've got the Platinum in PS4), but as already noted, for me there is only one good way to play the game (learn to parry correctly).