Suspect in 51 year old cold case dies 3 days before Police can arrest him

Jan 14, 2015
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#1
https://www.msn.com/en-us/video/vir...days-before-arrest/vi-BBSY8mh?ocid=spartandhp

Police believed they solved a decades-long murder mystery last week, but when they went to arrest the suspect they learned he had died days before.

Former Spokane County Sheriff’s deputy Duke J. Pierson was under investigation for the cold case deaths of three women, including the murder of Dorothy Fielding in 1967. On Friday, detectives were granted an arrest warrant for the 85-year-old, with charges of first-degree murder, but Pierson died three days before on Jan. 22 at his Alabama home, reportedly due to natural causes, according to a statement released by the department on Monday.

Prior to his death, in an April 2018 interview with police, Pierson denied killing Fielding.
In September 1967, 33-year-old Sandra Pierson, the suspect’s pregnant wife at the time, died in what was initially ruled a suicide, though the victim’s children believe their father was involved in their mom’s death.
 
Dec 1, 2017
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I am amazed by 50 year old cold cases.

Like how do investigators even find the time to keep working on these cases?

Also it's interesting how some folks who are scared/indifferent to talk at the time the case is open, decades later feel the guilt and throw the Dept a tip that solves a case that could have easily been solved.
 
Jun 2, 2013
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#7
I am amazed by 50 year old cold cases.

Like how do investigators even find the time to keep working on these cases?

Also it's interesting how some folks who are scared/indifferent to talk at the time the case is open, decades later feel the guilt and throw the Dept a tip that solves a case that could have easily been solved.
From my understanding there are departments picking up cold cases from the archive to see if the currently known methods allow to bring justice to the unsolved situation.
 
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Likes: JareBear
Apr 19, 2005
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The recent breakthroughs in several very old cold cases have come through investigations that use GEDmatch - a public database of genetic genealogy tests. For example - the breakthroughs in the Golden State Killer case and in the 1990s murder of a young teacher from Lancaster County, PA came from investigators submitting crime scene DNA samples to GEDmatch and then using "reverse genealogy" (building family trees of matches and then analyzing them to come up with a possible suspect):

https://abcnews.go.com/US/find-dna-genetic-genealogy-made-2018-year-crack/story?id=59367684

https://abcnews.go.com/US/dna-genetic-genealogy-led-wedding-dj-facing-criminal/story?id=58253768
 
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