ArcadeGAF! INSERT COINS

sploatee

formerly Oynox Slider
Sep 18, 2013
6,300
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SPLOAT
#1
This thread is inspired by all the good people on the TxK thread and is a bit long. Sorry in advance about that.

I am a generation or two older than most modern gamers and it wasn’t a home console which was my gateway drug to gaming. It was these beautiful things:





I grew up in a small seaside town in England where, if you couldn’t buy alcohol, there really was nothing to do but hang around the arcades. They were part of the culture there - my dad’s first job after he moved to the UK was servicing arcade machines and my first job was in the kitchen of a chippy right in the middle of all of the arcades. Everyone - girls and boys - would go to the arcades on breaks, smoke cigarettes and hang around.

If it wasn’t for playing this on a summer school trip (I must have been 6 years old-ish):





I’d never have taken up this wonderful, expensive and maddening hobby (it’s interesting that Centipede was designed to appeal to girls as much as boys - maybe that’s why it attracted me? I knew I wanted to play it after seeing all the psychedelic colours. Maybe I was just weird (still am)).

Arcades were wonderful and slightly crazy places. There’d be the hardcore fruit machine players (usually old ladies who sat chain smoking) sectioned off in one filthy corner, the big new games machines near the front and then rows and rows of older, cheaper games further in. You could find all sorts of oddities: games entirely in Japanese, obscure Neo-Geo games and lots and lots of broken joysticks. Even now there are games I can remember fondly but can’t for the life of me think what they were called.

There’s something about arcade games which I think has been lost with modern AAA games. This isn’t an either/or or a flame war against AAA games - they have their place - but arcade games always had an intensity right from the get-go; you might clear the first level or two and then - BANG! - you either shaped up or shipped out. Once you started to master a game, I think you could find a sense of flow that is still, for me, unparalleled.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flow_(psychology)

Of course, part of that intensity was designed to encourage death and bring in more coins, but the cash you put in created a genuine sense of risk and reward - not just for your score, but because you might only have a few coins left and if you died, that would be it. How long you played was (usually) determined entirely by how good you were at the game and you had to embrace each game on its own terms - not just the game itself, but its controllers, the cabinet art and - especially - the sound (most games were silent until you put your money in and part of the dazzling effect came when suddenly there would be a burst of audio after you’d hit “1 player”).

Most big-budget modern games - again, for me as an old-timer - are woolly. They aspire towards cinema but tend to have shallow, badly-written stories and they aspire towards masses of content rather than intensity, meaning you end up with the worst of both worlds: a game with a predictable, derivative narrative with little difficulty and little sense of mastery. There are exceptions but, in my experience, there’s precious little sense of achievement; you never really have to ‘earn’ your right to a boss battle because the designers are so keen for you to experience the pseudo-cinematic story they have put together.

So, I wanted to make this thread as a ‘shout-out’ to all the great arcades you might have played in, the great arcade games you might have played and to the best home console arcade-style games. I’ll start it off:





Neo Drift Out
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d50YE00hO98

I only found out what this was called recently - the version I played was entirely in Japanese. I watched a crowd of teenagers play it by slamming the joystick into turns and thought that was how it had to be played! That poor joystick. It was a big, chunky rally-racing game that threw huge sprites around at high speeds. I just used to hang around and watch people slam that joystick - it shows how arcades had their own customs - a lot of the time you'd pick up how a game was played by watching somebody else (how else were you meant to learn how to Hadouken?).






Space Harrier
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GOH68OsvOEI


It was the music that I really loved. I remember going with my mum to the arcades and recording the music with a small tape recorder so I could listen to it at home (I was a very popular child). Space Harrier was like entering another world; the pseudo-3D was so impressive at the time and it was just a riot of colour and surreal enemies (of course, in those days (ye old days) most games had an element of the surreal or strange in them). In the late-80s, Space Harrier was like my teleportation machine.





Missile Command

I never really played Missile Command in the arcades - it was installed on my family PC as part of an MS arcade collection but it’s a game that really captured my imagination. I’m utterly dreadful at it but it’s a great example of how arcade games just don’t wait to dial up the intensity and how they can create a engrossing atmosphere through simple design. There’s a lot of interesting stuff out there about how this game was political; about how it reflected a fear of a nuclear holocaust which couldn’t be escaped, but for me I love it because it’s so merciless and because the score multiplier increases so quickly you feel like a champion just for getting to the fifth wave.

You can play it here (along with some others) http://chrome.atari.com/missilecommand/






Motor Raid

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_s0wDjaWio

I don’t know why I got into Motor Raid. I think it might have been because the arcade it was in was right next door to work and because it was unpopular it was only 50p a go. But it was great fun - apparently it was based on the popular Manx TT racing game but it added in weapons and a futuristic art style. It’s a great example of how Sega just churned out impressive game after impressive game in the arcades. I remember their 90s games the best (Daytona, Fighting Vipers, Virtua Tennis) but there were so many others. Motor Raid's also a great example of how much a cabinet could add to the experience. I recall that it had fans that blew at you while you drove, that the bike had its own speakers and that the screen seemed huge.

….and two of the most recent ones I’ve enjoyed:







Resogun

Everyone knows Resogun, but I feel like its a great example of how an arcade-style game might appear to be simple (what could be simpler? shoot things, carry green men to green bar) but actually has huge amounts of depth. The scoring mechanisms in this game are so well put-together - whether its having to keep enough enemies on screen to keep up your multiplier, timing your overdrive to destroy the maximum number of enemies, having to use your boost at the right time both as a weapon and to move around the cylindrical play field and having to keep an eye out for the ‘keepers’ to make sure you don’t lose any poor little green men, there’s masses of strategy under the surface.





TxK

Yes, there’s an OT which is still active, but TxK is a great example of flow (and I'm shameless in wanting to support the developers). The fluidity of the graphics and the pounding rave soundtrack are almost as important to the game as the way it plays, but there are little details in it which fit it right into the kind of experience I’m talking about - the quirkiness (how many games do you know that tell you when you’ve won a “NICE CUP OF TEA”), the sound design (chunky explosions make blasting satisfying) and the intensity - no level lasts longer than a few minutes and your focus needs to be so sharp that a half-hour session can feel like a few hours. In a good way. It's a lot more forgiving than Missile Command, though. :)


So….please share, reminisce, think out loud, etc! Oh, and I'm deliberately not defining what makes an 'arcade-style game', although for me there are a few common traits (permadeath, immediacy, simple controls, a high score table...).

(Or not. Honestly, it’s more important than Titanfall. And more interesting than 30fps vs 60fps. Honest. (I'm joking, please don't shout at me, I'm just bitter because I have a PS4) )
 

Chacranajxy

I paid good money for this Dynex!
Oct 13, 2008
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#5
The arcades around here are basically a graveyard, full of abused controllers and busted monitors. Saw a broken Silent Scope machine at the movie theater a couple days ago. Didn't weep, but I wanted to.
 
Dec 5, 2008
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www.neogaf.com
#6
I cut my teeth on Arcades too, along with my neighbours Sinclair ZX Spectrum 48K. My first game on coin op machines was Kung Fu Master, never gone past the second floor/level though but I liked to watch players older than me get to the end of the game.



Pacman and Pinball Action were also my arcades of choice.






Latter I played a bit of Street Fighter II but I was not very good at it so I never invested my hard earned coins to get better at it hehehe I loved to play Blanka though. I remember that it was easier to pull his special moves.

 
Mar 6, 2012
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#7


The GOAT of arcade games. 6 player madness. Use to go and play this at our local arcade every Wednesday night. Wacky Wednesdays ! $10 every game free to play.
 
Aug 11, 2009
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#8
I helped run a new age arcade in South Florida. It was a ton of fun but I could feel the money bleeding from all over and ultimately died. I really miss Pop'n Music and IIDX, I'd love to own my own cabs. Net/Astro City cabs are also incredible.



The GOAT of arcade games. 6 player madness. Use to go and play this at our local arcade every Wednesday.
Ha, we had one of these in storage and eventually brought it the storefront. It took up so much space and no one really played it unfortunately. A couple of guys really loved this game.
 
Jun 24, 2005
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UK
#10
Which seaside town did you grow up in, out of interest?

I used to live relatively close to Southend, and my parents would take me there every few weeks. There used to be at least 10 or so massive arcades all down the road facing the seafront, and I'd hop from one to the other looking for the newest and most interesting games. Dead or Alive, Virtua Fighter 2 and then 3, Manx TT, Sega Rally, House of the Dead 1, Virtua Cop 1 and 2 (and then 3, very briefly), countless others I can't think of anymore. Absolutely amazing time of my life, I miss it greatly.

Of course, as the years went on, more and more fruit machines started appearing, the odd arcade would close down, and I think now there's only a couple left with almost all gambling of some kind. Haven't been there in years though. Fuck fruit machines.
 

Pelydr

mediocrity at its best
Apr 4, 2008
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#11
Some of my best youth memories are my mom taking me to a local arcade that had a bunch of old stuff you could play for a dime. She and I would play the hell out of Joust and Moon Patrol. Good times.
 

sploatee

formerly Oynox Slider
Sep 18, 2013
6,300
0
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SPLOAT
#12
Which seaside town did you grow up in, out of interest?

I used to live relatively close to Southend, and my parents would take me there every few weeks. There used to be at least 10 or so massive arcades all down the road facing the seafront, and I'd hop from one to the other looking for the newest and most interesting games. Dead or Alive, Virtua Fighter 2 and then 3, Manx TT, Sega Rally, House of the Dead 1, Virtua Cop 1 and 2 (and then 3, very briefly), countless others I can't think of anymore. Absolutely amazing time of my life, I miss it greatly.

Of course, as the years went on, more and more fruit machines started appearing, the odd arcade would close down, and I think now there's only a couple left with almost all gambling of some kind. Haven't been there in years though. Fuck fruit machines.
Blackpool. It was so much fun going in every couple of weeks - there was such a high turnover of games you could always find something new. I forgot to mention Virtua Cop 2! Gosh I loved that game. I got to the stage where I could get up to the final stage on 1 credit. I was very proud of myself!
 
Sep 29, 2009
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#13
It's so sad how quickly they died in the UK, and most other places really. It makes me feel ancient to remember a time where small towns here like Largs and Saltcoats both had multiple Street Fighter 2: CE cabs, the big sit-down ones, amongst numerous other games and they were slowly replaced by fruit/bingo/quiz machines. The last time I had an arcade near me Primal Rage was the hot shit.
 
Jan 16, 2011
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#14
Loved arcades as a kid. Absolutely loved them. My favorite was in the next town over from me, and it's actually still there...though it's mostly redemption games now. They had all the big stuff like SFII, Mortal Kombat, and the like...but they also had some obscure things like Arabian Fight and the CD-ROM based American Laser Games machines. They even had one of the few prototypes of Shootout at Old Tuscon.

My other favorite arcade place was when my family would go to Reno, Nevada. They had all the latest games at the arcades there, and it was fantastic.

The weird second FMV laserdisc boom of the early 90's helped propel me towards the career of filmmaking, weirdly enough.

If I got into arcade collecting, I'd probably try to restore/reconstruct a Mad Dog McCree machine. And maybe the original Star Wars. Those are my two favorites.
 

GDGF

Soothsayer
Jun 6, 2004
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Savannah, GA
#16
Arcades were a huge part of my life growing up. We had a mall with two of them - Diamond Jim's and Aladdin's Castle. Diamond Jim's was the kid friendly one, and Aladdin's Castle was the one that smelled like cigarette smoke where the older folks hung out.

Aladdin's Castle had the best games, though :)

Both operated on the token system, with nice red velvet bags that came in 5, 10, and 20 dollar varieties.

Early arcade days were great. Tons of variety. Everything from Dig-Dug to Dragon's Lair.

As I got older, the scene started to shift, and eventually everything was a fighter or a racing game.

I'd still rather have that than no arcade scene at all, though.
 
Jun 22, 2011
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#17
In 2011 I took my family on a trip to the Northeast and eastern Canada and made sure to include a stop by New Hampshire's FunSpot. I blog'd about it here.

I love arcades, particularly the old school ones of the early to mid-80s before it became endless fighting, racing, and shooting games. The variety of gameplay, the amazing cabinet art, and the wonderful mix of noise from all of the games is something I really miss. A trip to the roller rink, mall, or even the convenience or grocery store was something to look forward to if for any other reason than they all had cabinets. I particularly remember going up to visit my grandparents in New York and coming across my first Dragon's Lair cabinet. I had no idea about LaserDisc and thought that somehow games had suddenly just become that incredible overnight. Absolutely mesmerizing at the time.
 

GDGF

Soothsayer
Jun 6, 2004
23,924
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Savannah, GA
#18
Don't forget pinball! Pinball machines everywhere!

For a time.

They too slowly died off, though. The big attraction machines needed more floorspace, and pinball was first to go.
 
Jun 22, 2011
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#19
Don't forget pinball! Pinball machines everywhere!

For a time.

They too slowly died off, though. The big attraction machines needed more floorspace, and pinball was first to go.
...and in 2013 I took my family to the Southwest and we also visited the Pinball Hall of Fame, blog'd about here. FunSpot had some pinball too, about 50 machines, but PHoF had many, many more. Hoping to visit Pittsburgh in August for PAPA -- they have about 400 machines up there. If you enjoy pinball tables of old then Pinball Arcade is really nifty, it's on every platform pretty much.
 

GDGF

Soothsayer
Jun 6, 2004
23,924
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Savannah, GA
#20
...and in 2013 I took my family to the Southwest and we also visited the Pinball Hall of Fame, blog'd about here. FunSpot had some pinball too, about 50 machines, but PHoF had many, many more. Hoping to visit Pittsburgh in August for PAPA -- they have about 400 machines up there. If you enjoy pinball tables of old then Pinball Arcade is really nifty, it's on every platform pretty much.
Oh yeah! I've got it for my tablet. Definitely one of my most played games. So many tables! Black hole is probably my favorite (just because the corner store used to have it so I played it a bunch back in the day)

Nice blog! That place looks like pinball heaven!
 
Aug 19, 2011
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#21
I restored this SFIIWW cab a few years back. From start to finish the project cost me $275.
That looks sick!

I started playing in the mid 80's with Joust, Centipede, Dig-dug and Pac Man in cocktail cabinets, mostly at pizza places.

The arcade in the mall was amazing, and I'd always end up there while waiting for a movie to start or rarely buying a master system game (maybe after the knife gallery though, c'mon they had swords).

I really miss the sense of immediacy in games back then. Just feed in your quarter, hit start, and you're good to go. You didn't need tutorials because what you had to do was apparent.

As games have become more cinematic, I find myself watching almost as much as playing, but that sudden rush of adrenaline when you're playing in the zone is what I crave.
 
Apr 1, 2013
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#22
This really reminds me that I need to invest in a MAME cabinet sooner rather than later. Love me some arcade games.
Me too. Arcades are awesome (Pinball machines, too)! Been a big fan of them since I was a small child in the 80's.

It's too bad that they're most likely dead in the U.S. though while it's thriving in Japan.
 
Mar 25, 2010
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Chicago
#24
Theres actually a pretty awesome arcade near Chicago that I go on occasion to get my arcade fix callex galloping ghost.

http://www.gallopingghostarcade.com/games_list.htm

Pretty amazing place.

Just recently I started collecting PCBs and have a candy cab (sega astro city) on the way. Ill have to take some pics when it arrives. I am still very much an arcade gamer and my primary focus is shmups.

I do enjoy some modern console and PC gaming as well.
 
Feb 7, 2011
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#27
I started this hobby playing Ghosts n' Goblins and later great games like Mr Do, Tron, Yiar Kung-Fu but Street Fighter II and the Neo Geo definitely changed my life back then.

I always wished the arcade experience in my home back then (remember arcade-perfect graphics advertising on console games and always under delivering?) but unfortunately that's what killed arcades.

Nowadays I'm using my 360 as some sort of arcade machine. Playing Cave games, fighters and SHMUPs in general with an arcade stick remembering the old times.
 
May 30, 2011
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#28
I grew up on arcades (and Spectrum + 2) such a fantastic way to game, it was like going to a mini gaming convention everyday.

Double Dragon 1/2, Golden Axe, Operation Wolf, New Zealand Story, Final Fight, Buble Bobble, Rainbow Islands, Raygar, Atomic Runnerman and SF2 CE were my most played games even though I was never all that good at playing them back in the day.

Shame most modern gamers don't get to experience what we did back in the day. there is none left where I am, even if my local arcade is still open it's full of gambling machines and used to sell weed

The XBOX 360 is the next best thing (besides pcbs and MAME) so many new and old arcade games from Retail shmups, to downloadable like Virtual On OT on XBLA, tons of great arcade games on XBLIG all under the radar. MicroSoft was great for us type of gamers before they went full casual with the Kinnect.
 
Jan 8, 2009
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#29
Ah, arcades bring back such good memories. I grew up during the second golden age.
Time Out was one of my earliest hangouts. It was at the local mall and my dad would give us each five dollars for tokens, which back when games cost a quarter meant you could play a lot of games. I played games like Afterburner, Golden Axe, Street Fighter (the original), Final Fight, Street Fighter II here first. I still remember when they got a SFII machine. It was right in the middle near the entrance and there were lines to play it.

Here's a random Time Out pic:


There was random locally owned arcade we used to go too that was part of a bowling alley. Time Out eventually closed, but another arcade opened in the mall. It may have been an Aladdin's Castle, but I forget. I remember seeing and playing games like Mortal Kombat, Mortal Kombat II, Wrestlefest and other games at that arcade. I also played Virtua Fighter 1 for the first time at that arcade, which was the first 3-D game I had ever seen. I was blown away.

Another arcade that I remember going to and which still actually exists is in Oak Bluffs in Marthas Vineyard. I had an uncle that lived on the island who we'd visit every summer. It's called The Game Room and it was great. It's a real nice selection of classic arcade machines and newer ones plus some really antique arcade machines. I remember playing games like Samurai Showdown there alongside all the original golden age arcade cabinets.

 
May 30, 2011
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uk
#30
There’s something about arcade games which I think has been lost with modern AAA games. This isn’t an either/or or a flame war against AAA games - they have their place - but arcade games always had an intensity right from the get-go; you might clear the first level or two and then - BANG! - you either shaped up or shipped out. Once you started to master a game, I think you could find a sense of flow that is still, for me, unparalleled.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flow_(psychology)
That's one thing that first drew me into shmups a few years ago, I find the best games for reaching a state of flow are difficult, semi repetative and fast paced games especially those that get faster as you play.

Mushihimisama Futari Original would be my fave "flow" shmup it's speed and how you move your ship to dodge bullets and kill enemies is great for reaching a flow state. If I'm into the game I'm always in the zone by stages 4 and 5 which are streaming technique heavy.

Another good zone STG would be Nomltest, a freeware STG, it's just one long stage with no end that gets faster as you play. It's semi randomised enemy waves greatly ad to the effect.

The WipEout games are great for flow state as well.



I bet this isn't on MAME is it? there are a ton of unemulated SEGA arcade games that are lost to us. Planet Harriers, Dayatona 2. Along with their old console games like the Panzer Dragoons SEGA just doesn't give a fuck about their heritage, what did they do throw all their source code in the bin when the DC crashed and burned?
 

nyarla

Neo Member
Feb 7, 2012
105
0
0
nyarlu.net
#31
Loved arcades as a kid, though never played them that much for some reason.. We had a C64 at home from before I ever saw an arcade machine.. I didn't distinguish between them, didn't really notice the graphics on arcades were better or anything. They were all awesome though.

The main place i played them was Skateworld... have a bit of a rollerskate.. eat a hot dog.. play some Bubble Bobble, Rainbow Islands, TMNT.... was strangely attracted to Night Driver. (Living in north Australia we were probably behind the times..) The cinema had Snow Bros and Daytona.. every fish 'n' chip shop had at least one game. I always watched older kids playing Ghouls 'n' Ghosts while waiting for our order.. was stoked when we got the C64 version! (then later every chip shop had SF2. and years later, last time I was in a chip shop in my hometown, there was still a Metal Slug in there!)

When I lived in a rural bush area we used to walk 45 mins to another takeaway shop to buy dim sims and play this game they had which I wish I knew what it was.. Something along the lines of Bubble Bobble and Snow Bros but crazier and faster, more shooty, mighht've been in Japanese.

Ooh and the big arcade, Electric Dreams, had THE LOCK-IN on Saturday mornings. Pay $15 or something to get in, all machines on free play, doors closed, once you leave you can't get back in (unless you pay again presumably).

Oh yeah and my dad had an arcade PCB with joystick and buttons on a bit of chipboard in the shed when I was very young. I remember him saying it was Space Invaders but no idea if that memory is correct. I never saw it plugged into a tv and running...used to play with it anyway. Must ask him about that!
 
Sep 17, 2011
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#32
Arcades are great. I had a blast discovering a ton of great ones when I studied abroad in Japan. Here's a partial list I compiled all those years ago: http://shmups.system11.org/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=28040

I hope not too many of them have shut down or relocated since then. I saw that happen to a couple during the year I was there.

I'm currently the owner of a Sega Astro City and a handful of original boards. That's been a fun addition.
 
Jul 26, 2004
38,258
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1,320
Geelong, Australia
www.shaneus.com
#33
Don't forget pinball! Pinball machines everywhere!

For a time.

They too slowly died off, though. The big attraction machines needed more floorspace, and pinball was first to go.
Pinball's definitely making a comeback, though :) I'd honestly put money on Pinball Arcade being a massive contributor to how big it is today. I think traditional pinball folk underestimate that quite a bit.

...and in 2013 I took my family to the Southwest and we also visited the Pinball Hall of Fame, blog'd about here. FunSpot had some pinball too, about 50 machines, but PHoF had many, many more. Hoping to visit Pittsburgh in August for PAPA -- they have about 400 machines up there. If you enjoy pinball tables of old then Pinball Arcade is really nifty, it's on every platform pretty much.
I have no idea where you live or are near, but will you be in the vicinity of the Texas Pinball Festival in March? I'm flying over for it!
 

nyarla

Neo Member
Feb 7, 2012
105
0
0
nyarlu.net
#34
Emailed my dad about that arcade board in his shed and here's what he said..

nyarla's dad said:
Bought just the circuit board from a disposals place. It was from a coin in the slot arcade space invaders machine and needed a power supply (+5v -5v and +12v), joystick, fire button, loudspeaker and monitor. I built a regulated power supply and joystick and used a tv chassis standing on its side (portrait) for the monitor. The fire button and speaker were just standard things I had lying around. Had hours of fun playing it, and used to compete with blokes at work for high scores. I think I paid $12 for the board, and most of the other stuff I had lying around.
had no idea, very cool!
 
Feb 2, 2010
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#39
My avatar has a pic of one of all time favourite arcade games. Track & Field.

As someone who was born in 1971 I was lucky to see gaming essentially from the beginning and I look back at those arcade days (mainly the 80s) as a magical time in gaming. The sights the sounds and even the smells made it special.

All that said I think gaming is better now than it's ever been but it sure is nice to have the memories. Now if only this was my house - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONnjzs4nlYA
 

sploatee

formerly Oynox Slider
Sep 18, 2013
6,300
0
0
SPLOAT
#40
That's one thing that first drew me into shmups a few years ago, I find the best games for reaching a state of flow are difficult, semi repetative and fast paced games especially those that get faster as you play.

Mushihimisama Futari Original would be my fave "flow" shmup it's speed and how you move your ship to dodge bullets and kill enemies is great for reaching a flow state. If I'm into the game I'm always in the zone by stages 4 and 5 which are streaming technique heavy.

Another good zone STG would be Nomltest, a freeware STG, it's just one long stage with no end that gets faster as you play. It's semi randomised enemy waves greatly ad to the effect.

The WipEout games are great for flow state as well.



I bet this isn't on MAME is it? there are a ton of unemulated SEGA arcade games that are lost to us. Planet Harriers, Dayatona 2. Along with their old console games like the Panzer Dragoons SEGA just doesn't give a fuck about their heritage, what did they do throw all their source code in the bin when the DC crashed and burned?
I wouldn't know I'm afraid, I've only ever tried simple MAME games (things like Truxton/Tatsujin and Flying Shark). Sadly never had a 360 either, but I'm right with you on shmups, my favourite genre by far. It makes me sad how they've become such a niche area.

Espgaluda 2 on iOS was my game for about a year. It was perfect in every way.
 
Jan 12, 2012
18,258
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535
BC Canada
#41


Neo Drift Out
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d50YE00hO98

I only found out what this was called recently - the version I played was entirely in Japanese. I watched a crowd of teenagers play it by slamming the joystick into turns and thought that was how it had to be played! That poor joystick. It was a big, chunky rally-racing game that threw huge sprites around at high speeds. I just used to hang around and watch people slam that joystick - it shows how arcades had their own customs - a lot of the time you'd pick up how a game was played by watching somebody else (how else were you meant to learn how to Hadouken?).
Neo-Geo arcade cabinets were quite popular in the arcades when I was still in grade school, but I've never actually seen one with Neo Drift Out. I think the game looks quite awesome. But trhere was another game quite like this in one the arcades where I grew up, it was manufactured by Atari and developed by Gaelco...

The graphics were a little grainier, but the game was a blast: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMgLI9jnE6Y

Ah crap, somebody already posted this one. Great game though.

Thread needs more Stun Runner.

I poured so much money into that game.
Yeah, I remember spending a lot of time playing this one too: I've seen a few of these cabinets around in the past:

Few other random arcade cabinets from the past:

Laser Ghost , Sega's Ghostbusters type rip off game. I loved the guns for this one.


Lucky and Wild, Namco's parody of Tango and Cash. The game is half lightgun game and half driving game. I loved the scaling graphics in this one:





Sega's Time Traveler, Sega's Holographic arcade machine/ I remember when there were crazy long lineups at the local arcade of people who wanted to see this thing. It was a neat visual effect, but the game itself, wasn't very good.





Smash TV. Spent so much time playing this one with a friend back in the day. It's still one of my favorite arcade games:

 

Ataru

Unconfirmed Member
Dec 4, 2013
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#43
I miss the days when, even in a small town, I had 2 arcades in walking distance, plus just about every store at the nearby shopping center had at least one arcade machine. The laundromat had Frogger and Donkey Kong, the 7-11 had Dragon's Lair and Mrs. Pacman, and even the grocery store had Mr. Do.
 
Jun 4, 2011
12,689
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#44
<3

British arcades could be kind of sketchy places with scary looking older gangs of kids there was definately a code of conduct and corners you wouldn't want to hang around in. But in the 80s and early 90s there were some pretty big ones that carried loads of games old and new. I remember holidays spent just in the arcades in places like Blackpool playing all the classics, I recognised the picture in the OP immediately.

Chain-smoking Chinese kids would take over the King of Fighters cabinets here and you could never get them off and wouldn't dare challenge them because it would be a waste of money they were far too good, you'd just have to get in there early to play before they arrived!
 
Jun 24, 2005
3,333
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UK
#46


I bet this isn't on MAME is it? there are a ton of unemulated SEGA arcade games that are lost to us. Planet Harriers, Dayatona 2. Along with their old console games like the Panzer Dragoons SEGA just doesn't give a fuck about their heritage, what did they do throw all their source code in the bin when the DC crashed and burned?
Actually, I think Motor Raid might be emulated, if not in MAME then in a separate emulator. There's some Model 2 emulation kicking about. There's also some limited Model 3 emulation about, although I don't think it's very advanced right now, so Daytona 2 and others like Scud Race might be preserved.

There's no Hikaru emulation though, so Planet Harriers is probably lost when the last cabinet breaks, and there can't have been many of those to begin with. :( That's the saddest thing, really. For as many games that have been preserved through emulation, there are plenty of others that have been or are going to be lost because the state of the arcade industry means they won't be kept operational.
 
Jan 23, 2013
2,256
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#47
Even now there are games I can remember fondly but can’t for the life of me think what they were called.
Feel free to ask here or in the dedicated topic, I'm sure people here, including myself, would love to figure out which games they were if you haven't found out already.

Thanks for this topic btw, made me reminisce of some happy times when I was a kid. :)



I bet this isn't on MAME is it? there are a ton of unemulated SEGA arcade games that are lost to us. Planet Harriers, Dayatona 2. Along with their old console games like the Panzer Dragoons SEGA just doesn't give a fuck about their heritage, what did they do throw all their source code in the bin when the DC crashed and burned?
Actually, a lot of Sega Model 2 and 3 games are emulated very well with the Model2 and Supermodel emulators, respectively. Motor Raid is a Model 2A game and works pretty much perfectly on the Model 2 emulator. Here's the homepage for Model 2 (1.1a is the latest version) and head out here for the Supermodel (Model 3) emulator. Getting the ROMs is another matter but with a bit of googling you can find them. Also Daytona 2 works great on the Supermodel emulator, although I think there's some inconsistency in the loudness of some effects.

For me, arcade games hold a very special meaning. When I was a kid, my family would go to my grandparents in the summer during the 90s and me, my brother, a cousin and a very good friend would go to the arcades every day. We used to beg for a bit of allowance from our folks who would reluctantly give us a bit of cash. There was an arcade parlor (a few of them actually, surprisingly for a small town) with more than a dozen games. We only had a C64 for the longest time so for the most of my childhood I didn't own more current systems and most of my contact with more advanced and modern games was through friends and gaming parlors.

I remember a genuine Thunderblade cabinet, a flightstick and all and I thought it was mindblowing. The camera changes its position? Holy shit! :) It was the upright cabinet, not the complex looking one with the seat and everything. Didn't play it much but I drooled over other people playing it.



What I did play a lot was Cadillacs and Dinosaurs or as most people there called it - Mustapha. Everybody used to pick him since he's the most balanced, all-around character. I absolutely love that game even to this day. I think it's one of the most well crafted beat'em ups Capcom's ever made. There are more advanced and complex games out there, but the responsiveness, the timing and feel of the punches is incredible. We all played the shit out of it, remembered all of the boss strategies and even managed to complete it with 2P with 3 or 4 coins/continues.
I remember an anecdote where the coin slot bugged out I guess and it automatically activated 99 credits. Me and my brother already had coins so we just pretended to use them, sat down and played for an hour or two, since nobody had noticed yet. We even went to my cousin, called him and our friend, went back and it still had like 70 credits left but the other kids in the parlor already caught on and that day, everybody played "the Mustapha game". There was a girl that worked there that was really nice, I believe she was the daughter of the owner, she figured out what was going on but let us all play anyway. :) She used to occasionally give free credits to kids so it was our favorite place to hang out.

The cabinet we played on wasn't actually upright like in this picture, looked more like a custom made wooden candy cabinet, probably bootlegged stuff. A lot of the cabinets in that place were like that.



Another Capcom brawler we used to play a lot was Warriors of Fate. It had the addition of mountable horses that could dominate the screen if used correctly. Also lots of gore, dismemberment and blood. I remember the game being very hard for pretty much everyone that came to the parlor and one day a couple of older dudes (as in late teens probably) got through most of the game, up to a level we haven't seen before etc. So they ran out of coins and we asked them if we could chip in and continue their game to which they agreed. So my brother and I sat down and continued the game and I think we spent about 7-8 coins (yes, we were that bad at it) and finally completed it. It was an exhilarating moment because a lot of the kids gathered around us, it was quite the crowd and we were in the spotlight. And then the final boss just jumped off the god damn cliff. It was the most anti-climactic ending to a game we've seen 'till then, little did we know it was the bad ending, which we found out about years later.

Couldn't find a proper image of a WoF cabinet so here's the original japanese version (Tenchi wo Kurau II) in what looks like a candy cabinet.


Probably the most authentic and better looking of the cabinets in that place was the X-Men 4 Player version. The four of us played it a lot and the best bit about the game, aside from the awesomely animated graphics was learning the boss strategies, observing other people that knew some details, figuring out other stuff by yourself and so on. It was loud, flickery and full of colors with Colossus' HOOOOOAAAAAAA shout. :)

I think it was exactly this version of the cabinet.


The only arcade game I've ever mastered, so to speak, was Captain America and the Avengers, and it was in that same game parlor. By mastered I mean I learned the game so well that I could complete it with one coin. I even did that two or three times in a row just for kicks. I abused the jumping beam attack, mostly with Iron Man or Vision and figured out some tricks all by myself. Since I used to, shamefully, use a lot of cheats in games as a kid (mostly on C64), this was a huge deal for me. That summer the high-score table on that cabinet was mostly filled with my signature. Felt all sorts of proud about that. :)
I believe I had memorized all of the cutscenes and dialogues in the game, down to the ending text. Loved it even more so because of the broken English. "Why should it goes well?" is still one of my favorite video game quotes.
One day a younger kid approached me as I was entering the initials and asked me what they meant. He noticed me completing the game over and over for days and saw the initials in the high-scores. I explained they were just the starting letters of my name, my brother's and my cousin's. Felt a bit like a celebrity that day.

I guess I played a lot of brawlers, huh. :)


Man, there were a lot more games there, Track & Field, Captain Commando, P-47, Three Wonders, Sunset Riders etc. I remember another place where they had Mortal Kombat, Zero Team (which still isn't emulated, sadly, although there's some progress) and Cow Boys of Moo Mesa. The Mortal Kombat cabinet started to bug out after a while, showing sprite trails and all sorts of flickering, it was wild.
Some time earlier, was really young, I remember my brother playing Green Beret (Rush'n Attack), Soldier of Light (Xain'd Sleena) and Sky Fox. We actually only remembered the music and the fact there was a Valkyrie riding a space dragon in Star Fox and searched for the game for years. We were amazed at how accurately we've remember the tune.

That social part of playing in the arcades was an amazing thing. People would try to trick you into letting them play instead of you so they could "help you out" as they "knew how to beat this boss", gather around if somebody was beating the final boss, meet random people that would share a 2p game with you etc. The games were loud, colorful, with huge, beautifully animated characters and backgrounds. It was our temple where we'd worship these magical machines with joysticks and big buttons and feed them coins for their heavenly cause. Happy times.
 

sploatee

formerly Oynox Slider
Sep 18, 2013
6,300
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SPLOAT
#48
Neo-Geo arcade cabinets were quite popular in the arcades when I was still in grade school, but I've never actually seen one with Neo Drift Out. I think the game looks quite awesome. But trhere was another game quite like this in one the arcades where I grew up, it was manufactured by Atari and developed by Gaelco...

The graphics were a little grainier, but the game was a blast: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMgLI9jnE6Y

Ah crap, somebody already posted this one. Great game though.



Yeah, I remember spending a lot of time playing this one too: I've seen a few of these cabinets around in the past:



Few other random arcade cabinets from the past:

Laser Ghost , Sega's Ghostbusters type rip off game. I loved the guns for this one.


Lucky and Wild, Namco's parody of Tango and Cash. The game is half lightgun game and half driving game. I loved the scaling graphics in this one:





Sega's Time Traveler, Sega's Holographic arcade machine/ I remember when there were crazy long lineups at the local arcade of people who wanted to see this thing. It was a neat visual effect, but the game itself, wasn't very good.





Smash TV. Spent so much time playing this one with a friend back in the day. It's still one of my favorite arcade games:

I remember those! I can't remember playing Laser Ghost but it reminds me of a boxing game Sega made where each controller controlled a different hand. Smash TV was hilarious.
 

mrklaw

MrArseFace
Jun 10, 2004
59,901
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0
Windsor, UK
#50
My first arcade experience was possibly Battlezone. I remember finding it at a seaside arcade while on holiday, and it needed 2x5p coins for 1 credit - that is a very specific memory. It was a stand up cabinet with the 'commander goggles' you looked through and the twin sticks. Made me feel just like a proper tank driver :)


Other standout arcade games in my past would be


Star Wars (Atari). Sit down version was just a thing of beauty. The Amiga conversion was pretty damn good too with mouse controls.


Gauntlet - classic 4 player coop but a bit of a money swallower

Quartet - again 4 player coop but by sega, don't think I've ever seen a conversion of this.


Daytona USA - we used to have a 2 player sit down cabinet in our town centre, and a friend and I used to race each other constantly, shaving off fractions of a second here and there. At £1 a go, that got expensive fast. Must have spent over £100 on that machine. So good. And as good as the home conversions are, nothing matches the physicality of throwing the wheel around and slamming the gears from 4-2 or 4-1 to get the slides going.

that Drift Out reminds me a lot of Mille Migle - loved that in the arcades

One weird one that was in our local chip shop but I've never found since had vector graphics and you controlled a tank on screen, with I think four buttons for driving - so simulating tank tracks for steering etc. You had to protect a bunch of triangles in the middle of the screen which I think were fuel, and you had enemies coming on from random locations off screen to try and grab the fuel and take it off the screen.

You had infinite lives, but if you got shot you had to wait to respawn which gave the enemies time to take some of your fuel. Eventually the fuel canisters would be closer and closer to the edge so enemies could grab them more easily. Such a great game - if anyone has any idea what I'm talking about let me know.

edit: Oooh - 'Rip off' sounds like it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rip-Off

edit2: and a nice little blog from the writer of the game about 'flocking' behaviour and 'player vs entropy'. http://www.red3d.com/cwr/boids/RipOff_Flocking.html Damn the 80s were fantastic.