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Bitcoin, Cryptocurrency, Blockchain, and You: Navigating the Future of Tech (a NeoGAF discussion thread)

hariseldon

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Dark Rider Dark Rider personally I'd treat it as a store of value or an investment rather than using it to buy stuff. Bitcoin transactions aren't the easiest thing and the transaction fees are a bit high. Lightning improves that, but there are still usability issues (not least the dread and fear I still have that I could enter the destination address wrong and have my btc lost forever). Your objective is to increase the number of dollars in your hand. Nothing more, nothing less. Forget sentiment, forget sticking it to the man, forget curiosity over technology, your goal is to make money that you can spend or save for your retirement/kids/Porsche.

You're basically right with those two points. Now other coins are more suited to smaller transactions, I've been known to sell btc to ltc to shift coins from exchange to exchange for instance as the fees are lower and the transaction faster. Even DOGE sometimes but ffs don't hold that.

In terms of where to trade - they're all dodgy to some degree or other so be aware of that. Coinbase is a solid place to enter and exit crypto, ie get cash in and out. I used binance for some shitcoin trading (I've been known to trade shitcoins but I absolutely DO NOT hold them) as they have a good selection of shitcoins and good coins and the trading volume isn't too bad. Be VERY wary of low-volume coins and exchanges as they're highly manipulable and will screw you. Watch spread too (the gap between buy and sell price). Low-volume coins tend to have a big spread. Avoid coins that are something stupid like 100 satoshis (a satoshi is the smallest unit of bitcoin) in value. I've made money on them but they're a pure gamble.

Consider mining if you have a rig and access to free electricity - I made a few hundred quid mining IPBC as it was then (now TUBE).

https://coinmarketcap.com/ is a useful resource - you can track the prices over the lifetime of a coin. You'll see most have a biiiiiiiiig spike upwards and then never do anything again. If you catch that big spike you damn well sell when it's in profit because as you can probably see, it spikes up fast but goes back down fast too. Be VERY wary of buying during the spike as you won't know when to jump off.

If Bitcoin is going dildonic (I'm thinking times like when it hit 20k) there are some signs to look out for to know when to get out. The best is the daily chart - if the big blow-off top happens with insane volume and even your granny is buying bitcoin, be prepared to sell - if you see a second peak form but the RSI on the daily chart on tradingview is lower, that's a good indication that it's run out of fuel or will do soon and you should consider exiting your position.

Useful tools to have on your charts include RSI and Bollinger Bands, the latter is invented by a chap who is wonderfully friendly and useful on twitter, he designed it years ago for non-crypto markets so i think he's a bit bemused by his celebrity status in the crypto world. Volume however is super important. Keep an eye on it as it'll tell you a lot. Look at price points that get hit frequently. Look at psychological levels like big round numbers (10k) and meme numbers (omg it's over 9000).

Be aware that chart patterns and tools are not 100% guarantees on which direction things are going to go.
 
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hariseldon

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Aug 22, 2018
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hariseldon hariseldon

What's your view on other coins like XRP, XLM etc?
You can make some money on them short term but I don't trust them enough to hold - I consider both to be shitcoins. Looking at XRPBTC right now on the daily chart (btw for btc never go below daily - for shitcoins movement can be a bit volatile so it can be worth looking at shorter timeframes) - it looks like a cup and handle where the cup is from late April 2020 to a few days ago, and we're currently in the handle. See https://www.investopedia.com/terms/c/cupandhandle.asp - looking at btc from Nov 2018 to July 2019 you'll see what a cup and handle can do, so there's potential there though I'd drop it if the price went below 2400 sats. That level would probably tie in well with bouncing off the middle-line of the Bollinger Band if it's well-timed.

The XLMBTC chart is a bit too messy - personally I'd be wary of it, as there's really no evidence of a trend, just oscillation and not even oscillation that I'd be willing to trade.
 
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Dark Rider

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Dark Rider Dark Rider personally I'd treat it as a store of value or an investment rather than using it to buy stuff. Bitcoin transactions aren't the easiest thing and the transaction fees are a bit high. Lightning improves that, but there are still usability issues (not least the dread and fear I still have that I could enter the destination address wrong and have my btc lost forever). Your objective is to increase the number of dollars in your hand. Nothing more, nothing less. Forget sentiment, forget sticking it to the man, forget curiosity over technology, your goal is to make money that you can spend or save for your retirement/kids/Porsche.
I'm not planning to use it to buy things regularly but my idea was as a trader it is a good idea to know what I'm trading and since this is a currency I thought I'll use it once or twice to actually buy something from any store that accept it just so I understand it fully because if a trader understand the thing they are investing in they become better at extracting more money trading it, other than that I agree with what you said it is ultimately to make money nothing more nothing less.

You're basically right with those two points. Now other coins are more suited to smaller transactions, I've been known to sell btc to ltc to shift coins from exchange to exchange for instance as the fees are lower and the transaction faster. Even DOGE sometimes but ffs don't hold that.

In terms of where to trade - they're all dodgy to some degree or other so be aware of that. Coinbase is a solid place to enter and exit crypto, ie get cash in and out. I used binance for some shitcoin trading (I've been known to trade shitcoins but I absolutely DO NOT hold them) as they have a good selection of shitcoins and good coins and the trading volume isn't too bad. Be VERY wary of low-volume coins and exchanges as they're highly manipulable and will screw you. Watch spread too (the gap between buy and sell price). Low-volume coins tend to have a big spread. Avoid coins that are something stupid like 100 satoshis (a satoshi is the smallest unit of bitcoin) in value. I've made money on them but they're a pure gamble.

Consider mining if you have a rig and access to free electricity - I made a few hundred quid mining IPBC as it was then (now TUBE).

https://coinmarketcap.com/ is a useful resource - you can track the prices over the lifetime of a coin. You'll see most have a biiiiiiiiig spike upwards and then never do anything again. If you catch that big spike you damn well sell when it's in profit because as you can probably see, it spikes up fast but goes back down fast too. Be VERY wary of buying during the spike as you won't know when to jump off.

If Bitcoin is going dildonic (I'm thinking times like when it hit 20k) there are some signs to look out for to know when to get out. The best is the daily chart - if the big blow-off top happens with insane volume and even your granny is buying bitcoin, be prepared to sell - if you see a second peak form but the RSI on the daily chart on tradingview is lower, that's a good indication that it's run out of fuel or will do soon and you should consider exiting your position.

Useful tools to have on your charts include RSI and Bollinger Bands, the latter is invented by a chap who is wonderfully friendly and useful on twitter, he designed it years ago for non-crypto markets so i think he's a bit bemused by his celebrity status in the crypto world. Volume however is super important. Keep an eye on it as it'll tell you a lot. Look at price points that get hit frequently. Look at psychological levels like big round numbers (10k) and meme numbers (omg it's over 9000).

Be aware that chart patterns and tools are not 100% guarantees on which direction things are going to go.
Thank you very much for all the insight, I'll take it to heart and make sure I read all the resources I can get my hands on and hopefully I land on my feet starting this and not crash :messenger_grinning_sweat:
 

hariseldon

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Aug 22, 2018
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I'm not planning to use it to buy things regularly but my idea was as a trader it is a good idea to know what I'm trading and since this is a currency I thought I'll use it once or twice to actually buy something from any store that accept it just so I understand it fully because if a trader understand the thing they are investing in they become better at extracting more money trading it, other than that I agree with what you said it is ultimately to make money nothing more nothing less.

Thank you very much for all the insight, I'll take it to heart and make sure I read all the resources I can get my hands on and hopefully I land on my feet starting this and not crash :messenger_grinning_sweat:
Basically treat it like gold, not cash. The market behaviour is in many ways closer to gold than forex anyway.
 

hariseldon

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Aug 22, 2018
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Btw if you want to have some fun gambling and learning to trade, it's good to have a small amount of actual cash on it. Sure you can paper-trade on https://testnet.bitmex.com/ for instance, but if you put say £50 of crypto on the real thing (bitmex.com - leveraged trading is super-risky so stick to 1x while you figure it out) you'll feel the pressure, the emotions you have to master, and get that trading buzz with minimal cost. Don't add to that £50. If you crash the account, stop.
 

Dark Rider

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Apr 20, 2013
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Basically treat it like gold, not cash. The market behaviour is in many ways closer to gold than forex anyway.
Yes i thought of that but then gold does not have a limit so there is always the possibility to get more gold (including from asteroids) with bitcoin there is a limit on how much you can mine per each currency so the dynamic of the value is a little different I thought. But I'm a newbie trying to understand it all so I could be wrong on all accounts :messenger_tears_of_joy:
 
Dec 25, 2018
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I remember this starting out way back in 2008 from a College Classmate of mine trying to mine some.

Wish I asked to buy one for £10 now but I seen it go from being useless to being a collosal money maker in a space of a few years.

Personally, I wouldn't invest into something like it purely because I believe once technology and CPUs catch up to manipulate and duplicate the currency to the direct coding, in addition to competition from Country's Currencies going digital, the Bitcoin will lose it's value eventually.

I do think it is a good investment in the mid term (up to 10 years), and I think if you have the money then to invest in it, but I think the exit strategy is to get out before the tech catches up for it to become easily manipulated (could never happen, but it's the risk I see in 11 to 20 years time).

I personally invested in Gold in the long term but that itself has issues which I am willing to take a risk on.

I tried to enter the Stock Exchange but the stupid websites won't let me invest for some reason and when I enquire this I get the same dumb answer of "You invested 7 years ago and sold your shares", like no shit but I want to try it again you idiots.
 
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Dark Rider

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Btw if you want to have some fun gambling and learning to trade, it's good to have a small amount of actual cash on it. Sure you can paper-trade on https://testnet.bitmex.com/ for instance, but if you put say £50 of crypto on the real thing (bitmex.com - leveraged trading is super-risky so stick to 1x while you figure it out) you'll feel the pressure, the emotions you have to master, and get that trading buzz with minimal cost. Don't add to that £50. If you crash the account, stop.
Will start with paper-trade then put a 50 then IF I was doing great I'll go from there.

I remember this starting out way back in 2008 from a College Classmate of mine trying to mine some.

Wish I asked to buy one for £10 now but I seen it go from being useless to being a collosal money maker in a space of a few years.

Personally, I wouldn't invest into something like it purely because I believe once technology and CPUs catch up to manipulate and duplicate the currency to the direct coding, in addition to competition from Country's Currencies going digital, the Bitcoin will lose it's value eventually.

I do think it is a good investment in the mid term (up to 10 years), and I think if you have the money then to invest in it, but I think the exit strategy is to get out before the tech catches up for it to become easily manipulated (could never happen, but it's the risk I see in 11 to 20 years time).
New cryptocurrencies will be made I think :pie_thinking:
 
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hariseldon

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Aug 22, 2018
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Yes i thought of that but then gold does not have a limit so there is always the possibility to get more gold (including from asteroids) with bitcoin there is a limit on how much you can mine per each currency so the dynamic of the value is a little different I thought. But I'm a newbie trying to understand it all so I could be wrong on all accounts :messenger_tears_of_joy:
While you're right that gold doesn't have a limit, for most purposes it's limited enough. Where for instance with ETH, if he so desired Vitalik Buterin could mandate an increase to the limit at will, and even bump the production rate, to make your coins worthless. He likely wouldn't because that would be the end of his career in crypto but he could, while of course you just don't have that risk with Gold. Bitcoin doesn't have that risk due to the fact that the creator disappeared and the whole thing is run on consensus with powerful economic incentives.
 
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Dark Rider

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While you're right that gold doesn't have a limit, for most purposes it's limited enough. Where for instance with ETH, if he so desired Vitalik Buterin could mandate an increase to the limit at will, and even bump the production rate, to make your coins worthless. He likely wouldn't because that would be the end of his career in crypto but he could, while of course you just don't have that risk with Gold. Bitcoin doesn't have that risk due to the fact that the creator disappeared and the whole thing is run on consensus with powerful economic incentives.
I'm reading up on all of it and yes he could but it will be a stupid idea, I just think in the long term there will be new coins to suite the times and the current coins will just have a mining limit that will be a major factor in their value in the market.
 

hariseldon

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Aug 22, 2018
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I remember this starting out way back in 2008 from a College Classmate of mine trying to mine some.

Wish I asked to buy one for £10 now but I seen it go from being useless to being a collosal money maker in a space of a few years.

Personally, I wouldn't invest into something like it purely because I believe once technology and CPUs catch up to manipulate and duplicate the currency to the direct coding, in addition to competition from Country's Currencies going digital, the Bitcoin will lose it's value eventually.

I do think it is a good investment in the mid term (up to 10 years), and I think if you have the money then to invest in it, but I think the exit strategy is to get out before the tech catches up for it to become easily manipulated (could never happen, but it's the risk I see in 11 to 20 years time).

I personally invested in Gold in the long term but that itself has issues which I am willing to take a risk on.

I tried to enter the Stock Exchange but the stupid websites won't let me invest for some reason and when I enquire this I get the same dumb answer of "You invested 7 years ago and sold your shares", like no shit but I want to try it again you idiots.
The biggest technical threat to bitcoin is someone cracking the cryptography. It's held up pretty well so far, but if it ever happens the value goes to zero. If it avoids that (and I'd say quantum computing is the biggest threat) then it's good to go. Its biggest selling point is being completely decentralised, not beholden to a government. Government-owned coins will go the same way as the US Dollar, GBP, etc where the money printer will go brr. Governments lack fiscal discipline (and sometimes it's necessary for human beings - the money printer may be the only way out of this mess in some ways) and thus a decentralised coin offers things a government-backed one does not.

Have you looked at sites like oanda (https://trade.oanda.com/) at all? I paper trade on that for fun.

Will start with paper-trade then put a 50 then IF I was doing great I'll go from there.

New cryptocurrencies will be made I think :pie_thinking:
Good. Be aware that testnet is less active and you're trading vs newbies so it's a far easier trade than real bitmex but you will see some of the same behaviour like people putting up huge buy/sell walls at particular levels to spook the market, etc.

As for new coins - there are new coins every day. Everyone has a get-rich-quick scheme. The number of GOOD coins being created however is infinitesimal. BTC was the original, LTC is useful but doesn't bring anything new, it's just the silver to BTC's gold, ETH is the only one to come and offer something new with its programmable model for creating tokens, though that benefits Vitalik more than anyone else. Every other coin out there is either a fork of an existing one or has cryptography that I'd not trust. The quality of the cryptography and the economic model are what matter most.
 
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Dark Rider

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The biggest technical threat to bitcoin is someone cracking the cryptography. It's held up pretty well so far, but if it ever happens the value goes to zero. If it avoids that (and I'd say quantum computing is the biggest threat) then it's good to go. Its biggest selling point is being completely decentralised, not beholden to a government. Government-owned coins will go the same way as the US Dollar, GBP, etc where the money printer will go brr. Governments lack fiscal discipline (and sometimes it's necessary for human beings - the money printer may be the only way out of this mess in some ways) and thus a decentralised coin offers things a government-backed one does not.

Have you looked at sites like oanda (https://trade.oanda.com/) at all? I paper trade on that for fun.
I'm reading that BTC and BTC cash are losing some aspects of their decentralization due to drama few years ago which put them closer to the regular currencies than all the other crypto currencies?

Good. Be aware that testnet is less active and you're trading vs newbies so it's a far easier trade than real bitmex but you will see some of the same behaviour like people putting up huge buy/sell walls at particular levels to spook the market, etc.

As for new coins - there are new coins every day. Everyone has a get-rich-quick scheme. The number of GOOD coins being created however is infinitesimal. BTC was the original, LTC is useful but doesn't bring anything new, it's just the silver to BTC's gold, ETH is the only one to come and offer something new with its programmable model for creating tokens, though that benefits Vitalik more than anyone else. Every other coin out there is either a fork of an existing one or has cryptography that I'd not trust. The quality of the cryptography and the economic model are what matter most.
I agree, what I meant though if the current currencies get broken (like being cracked as you mentioned) someone will take the opportunity and make a new one to replace it that can stand the test.

And yes I figured testnet was for newbies and bored veterans who want to mess with them :messenger_beaming:
 

hariseldon

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I'm reading that BTC and BTC cash are losing some aspects of their decentralization due to drama few years ago which put them closer to the regular currencies than all the other crypto currencies?



I agree, what I meant though if the current currencies get broken (like being cracked as you mentioned) someone will take the opportunity and make a new one to replace it that can stand the test.

And yes I figured testnet was for newbies and bored veterans who want to mess with them :messenger_beaming:
Bitcoin cash is a big fucking scam that got out of hand. It's a bad fork, best avoided. I don't trade it. The bitcoin cash mess has not caused any loss of decentralisation to BTC proper - there's still a tonne of hashing power dedicated to BTC - the biggest risk in that department is companies like bitmain getting too big, though again the incentives for them to remain honest are pretty good - bear in mind that if they play silly buggers then the community will fork the chain and leave them with a worthless coin.

As for new coins - cryptography is really fucking hard. Satoshi was an absolute genius to create crypto that is so strong as to be (so far) indestructible. He's also provided a good template for others to use. I can't recall any coins (not even shitcoins - in part because most are just ERC tokens or BTC forks so they're using tech that's already proven) being cryptographically attacked, only shitcoins getting 51%'d, but that was because they had criminally low hashing power behind them so it was easy for someone with lots of mining gear to fuck with them. For the most part, those who want to get rich hacking stuff have tended to go after the exchanges and mining pools (binance had a large amount of coin go missing for instance though if I recall they reimbursed customers - on the other hand way back we have MtGox which was a huuuuuge scam where people lost a lot of money).

Btw avoid https://coinmarketcap.com/rankings/exchanges/ as it is so manipulated it's not even funny - not a good way to figure out exchanges. I've personally used at various points Coinbase, Binance, Okex (briefly but I concluded it was shit), HitBTC (as per okex), Kraken waaaay back when btc was about $1000 (wouldn't touch it now), Bitfinex (I got in before the crazy account size limits came in - it's heavily manipulated and its price is often out of whack with other exchanges - I wouldn't use it now), KuCoin for some shitcoin trading (volume is a bit low and fees for withdrawals can be a bit high), Bittrex (mostly just to sell mined shitcoins), and for some real dumpster diving TradeOgre (do NOT use it under any circumstances).
 

hariseldon

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Btw - if you're storing wallets on a local machine, ffs make damn sure it's clean. No viruses. Personally I'd suggest having a linux box dedicated to the job if you're going to do that.
 

Dark Rider

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Bitcoin cash is a big fucking scam that got out of hand. It's a bad fork, best avoided. I don't trade it. The bitcoin cash mess has not caused any loss of decentralisation to BTC proper - there's still a tonne of hashing power dedicated to BTC - the biggest risk in that department is companies like bitmain getting too big, though again the incentives for them to remain honest are pretty good - bear in mind that if they play silly buggers then the community will fork the chain and leave them with a worthless coin.
Didn't they go to vote in the initial drama and the vote result created this mess? I could be misunderstanding it all.

As for new coins - cryptography is really fucking hard. Satoshi was an absolute genius to create crypto that is so strong as to be (so far) indestructible. He's also provided a good template for others to use. I can't recall any coins (not even shitcoins - in part because most are just ERC tokens or BTC forks so they're using tech that's already proven) being cryptographically attacked, only shitcoins getting 51%'d, but that was because they had criminally low hashing power behind them so it was easy for someone with lots of mining gear to fuck with them. For the most part, those who want to get rich hacking stuff have tended to go after the exchanges and mining pools (binance had a large amount of coin go missing for instance though if I recall they reimbursed customers - on the other hand way back we have MtGox which was a huuuuuge scam where people lost a lot of money).
I think some tried but I don't know if there ever were any concentrated effort. The test in my book is one of the big governments trying to crack it.

Btw avoid https://coinmarketcap.com/rankings/exchanges/ as it is so manipulated it's not even funny - not a good way to figure out exchanges. I've personally used at various points Coinbase, Binance, Okex (briefly but I concluded it was shit), HitBTC (as per okex), Kraken waaaay back when btc was about $1000 (wouldn't touch it now), Bitfinex (I got in before the crazy account size limits came in - it's heavily manipulated and its price is often out of whack with other exchanges - I wouldn't use it now), KuCoin for some shitcoin trading (volume is a bit low and fees for withdrawals can be a bit high), Bittrex (mostly just to sell mined shitcoins), and for some real dumpster diving TradeOgre (do NOT use it under any circumstances).
I'll keep this list and your comment on each exchange handy, thank you :messenger_smiling:

Btw - if you're storing wallets on a local machine, ffs make damn sure it's clean. No viruses. Personally I'd suggest having a linux box dedicated to the job if you're going to do that.
Any particular linux distro? old ubuntu is fine? also transferring files to and from is a risk to worry about?
 

John Mullins

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This reminds me... I put £100 into Bitcoin for purposes a few years ago. Just checked and today it is at £450. But it was up at £900 at one point - when BTC fleetingly came into the public's consciousness. Can't remember why but there was hype for a very short while.

Do I extract now or wait for the revolution? :messenger_tears_of_joy:
 
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hariseldon

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Aug 22, 2018
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Any particular linux distro? old ubuntu is fine? also transferring files to and from is a risk to worry about?
Ubuntu is fine, grab as recent a release (or an LTS version) as you can so that you can keep it up-to-date. You may want to keep it disconnected from the internet between transactions.

This reminds me... I put £100 into Bitcoin for purposes a few years ago. Just checked and today it is at £450. But it was up at £900 at one point - when BTC fleetingly came into the public's consciousness. Can't remember why but there was hype for a very short while.

Do I extract now or wait for the revolution? :messenger_tears_of_joy:
Up to you - you presumably don't miss the £100 but if for instance that £450 would get you out of a hole now then you could cash in - it's difficult to advise these situations because everyone has different outcomes they want, and it's pretty much impossible to predict a long way into the future. That said, £450 is about 0.05 btc - the price would therefore have to do something absolutely fucking nuts for that 0.05btc to be worth a large amount of $/£/€. The most insane spells were when it went from $100 to $1000 back in late 2013 and when it went from $1000 to $20000 from June 2017 to December 2017. Assuming then that 20x is the best you'll get (and that's a fairly faulty assumption but precedent is all we have) then maybe it might be possible to turn that £450 into £9000 - that's if you catch the peak perfectly (you won't - for starters at the blow-off top all the exchanges will be so heavily loaded with traffic you'll have a hard time executing your orders). More likely, if the peak would have got you £9000, you'll get £7500. For reference, I scaled in from Dec 2018 to Mar 2019 with an average buy-in price around $3700 if I recall, something in that vicinity, and the next peak was $13500ish, but I cashed out after that at about £11500. I missed opportunities to get more, no doubt, but I was happy with what I collected, because nobody can time top and bottom perfectly (apart from buying the exact top and selling the exact bottom - a skill that many people seem to manage).

Note that none of this is financial advice.
 

nemiroff

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Feb 19, 2018
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I used to be excited about this stuff. But got exhausted and lost all faith after a few months. Most of the scene has been a massive scam exploiting average Joe's confusion about front-loaded shitcoins. I ended up selling off most of my holdings, no regrets. But I still have about 2K in various currencies, although I haven't even opened my exchange accounts in perhaps 6-7 months.. Fuck it, let's go bowling.
 
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Dec 25, 2018
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The biggest technical threat to bitcoin is someone cracking the cryptography. It's held up pretty well so far, but if it ever happens the value goes to zero. If it avoids that (and I'd say quantum computing is the biggest threat) then it's good to go. Its biggest selling point is being completely decentralised, not beholden to a government. Government-owned coins will go the same way as the US Dollar, GBP, etc where the money printer will go brr. Governments lack fiscal discipline (and sometimes it's necessary for human beings - the money printer may be the only way out of this mess in some ways) and thus a decentralised coin offers things a government-backed one does not.

Have you looked at sites like oanda (https://trade.oanda.com/) at all? I paper trade on that for fun.
No one can trust the Govts atm because of the money making just to keep the economy afloat!!! Although sadly most people have no choice but to keep using fiat currency.

I'd say Crypto is pretty safe at the moment but I have a feeling that it has a lot of problems in other ways where say you couldn't own it physically if your Eletronical Possessions were taken away with no access to your Account (unless you go to a Library), as well as other things. It is good to diversify your portfolio though and for now it is a great alternative for anyone who can Invest in it.

I will take a look at that website but I am an extreme n00b in stuff like that and will likely make a loss. :(

Do you have any knowledge in Stock Brokers that could assist me? Been looking into it but they mention a lot of fees to even get started.
 

hariseldon

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Aug 22, 2018
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No one can trust the Govts atm because of the money making just to keep the economy afloat!!! Although sadly most people have no choice but to keep using fiat currency.

I'd say Crypto is pretty safe at the moment but I have a feeling that it has a lot of problems in other ways where say you couldn't own it physically if your Eletronical Possessions were taken away with no access to your Account (unless you go to a Library), as well as other things. It is good to diversify your portfolio though and for now it is a great alternative for anyone who can Invest in it.

I will take a look at that website but I am an extreme n00b in stuff like that and will likely make a loss. :(

Do you have any knowledge in Stock Brokers that could assist me? Been looking into it but they mention a lot of fees to even get started.
Oanda offer a demo account to practice on, start there!

Re confiscation of crypto - there's a couple of ways you can skin it. Now the actual running wallet you want on a local box that's nicely secured etc, but there's no harm in leaving your wallet in a suitably encrypted file with a fat password somewhere on the internet as a backup so that if you lose your hd you can retrieve the backup. Other options include the mnemonic keys - print one out, hide it somewhere. There are lots of options for the truly paranoid. I take the view however that if things get that bad then we're all fucked anyway, so I accept a moderate risk and had wallets on mostly airgapped linux boxes plus some trading funds on exchanges (remember you can't do rapid trades if it's in your wallet - that's why we keep some on exchanges).

The big target really for governments is fiat on/offramps - binance and coinbase being among them - legally governments require some collection of user data which makes it impossible to get cash in/out of those without ID. You can of course trade with people locally person-to-person using services like https://localbitcoins.com/ but that comes with its own risks. If governments were to target those services though and stop people transacting with them, it would make it very hard to get fiat into the crypto world and thus stagnate prices badly.
 
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Jun 4, 2020
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I have a decent amount of money invested in crypto that I don't think I'm ever going to get back. I invested heavily in Ethereum and Tron at the height of their value, plus I also have over 350,000 Electroneum sitting around. If I would've sold my Electroneum back in January 2018 I would've made over 70 grand. But I didn't and I don't see that coin ever getting to 20 cents again. Tough pill to swallow but I took it as a learning experience. I'm still holding though and if we ever get another crazy crypto run I will sell right away. even if I just break even.
 

hariseldon

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Aug 22, 2018
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I have a decent amount of money invested in crypto that I don't think I'm ever going to get back. I invested heavily in Ethereum and Tron at the height of their value, plus I also have over 350,000 Electroneum sitting around. If I would've sold my Electroneum back in January 2018 I would've made over 70 grand. But I didn't and I don't see that coin ever getting to 20 cents again. Tough pill to swallow but I took it as a learning experience. I'm still holding though and if we ever get another crazy crypto run I will sell right away. even if I just break even.
Just had a look at the trading volume for ETN (https://coinmarketcap.com/currencies/electroneum/markets) and it's dead. About $160k/day roughly, which really isn't enough to drive any real price movement (and you can see that from the moribund price action). With that said, the low volume does make it super-vulnerable to a pump and dump. Let's say one of the twitter crypto types decides to shill it, idiots buy and of course our twitter twatter sells the top because he and his mates already bought a load of it on the cheap and co-ordinate to dump that motherfucker on the unsuspecting idiots who bought on the way up. If you get lucky you'll get a wave like that, almost certainly not enough to get back what you lost but at the very least to mitigate losses and give you a bigger stack of BTC you can use elsewhere.
 
Jun 4, 2020
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Just had a look at the trading volume for ETN (https://coinmarketcap.com/currencies/electroneum/markets) and it's dead. About $160k/day roughly, which really isn't enough to drive any real price movement (and you can see that from the moribund price action). With that said, the low volume does make it super-vulnerable to a pump and dump. Let's say one of the twitter crypto types decides to shill it, idiots buy and of course our twitter twatter sells the top because he and his mates already bought a load of it on the cheap and co-ordinate to dump that motherfucker on the unsuspecting idiots who bought on the way up. If you get lucky you'll get a wave like that, almost certainly not enough to get back what you lost but at the very least to mitigate losses and give you a bigger stack of BTC you can use elsewhere.
I bought my Electroneum during the ICO at 1 cent. And a big chunck of the ones I have were given to me freely so I only need it to get to a few cents and I should make some decent money. Whatever happens I'm not banging my head on the wall, I invested what I could afford. I didn't risk my mortgage or livelihood on cryptos. Hell I have probably lost more money in Forex and that I won't get back.
 

hariseldon

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I bought my Electroneum during the ICO at 1 cent. And a big chunck of the ones I have were given to me freely so I only need it to get to a few cents and I should make some decent money. Whatever happens I'm not banging my head on the wall, I invested what I could afford. I didn't risk my mortgage or livelihood on cryptos. Hell I have probably lost more money in Forex and that I won't get back.
Ah ICOs.. yeah I made some mistakes there too. Mine was LGO. Now getting to a few cents would require the price to go up 10x - the difficulty you have here is that when bitcoin goes nuts alts crash (generally speaking) so you won't get that value - the alt spike then tends to happen as bitcoin is on the way down, and tends to be where the big players mop up the remaining cash by pumping and dumping alts to acquire and sell bitcoin. It's fascinating stuff really.
 
Dec 25, 2018
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Oanda offer a demo account to practice on, start there!

Re confiscation of crypto - there's a couple of ways you can skin it. Now the actual running wallet you want on a local box that's nicely secured etc, but there's no harm in leaving your wallet in a suitably encrypted file with a fat password somewhere on the internet as a backup so that if you lose your hd you can retrieve the backup. Other options include the mnemonic keys - print one out, hide it somewhere. There are lots of options for the truly paranoid. I take the view however that if things get that bad then we're all fucked anyway, so I accept a moderate risk and had wallets on mostly airgapped linux boxes plus some trading funds on exchanges (remember you can't do rapid trades if it's in your wallet - that's why we keep some on exchanges).

The big target really for governments is fiat on/offramps - binance and coinbase being among them - legally governments require some collection of user data which makes it impossible to get cash in/out of those without ID. You can of course trade with people locally person-to-person using services like https://localbitcoins.com/ but that comes with its own risks. If governments were to target those services though and stop people transacting with them, it would make it very hard to get fiat into the crypto world and thus stagnate prices badly.
I see practice when I signed up but now it's gone. Am I already in it or is it hidden in the menus?

That is very interesting stuff to read. Although I am surprised you can back it up to be honest as it sounds like you could duplicate it? :LOL:
 

hariseldon

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Aug 22, 2018
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I see practice when I signed up but now it's gone. Am I already in it or is it hidden in the menus?

That is very interesting stuff to read. Although I am surprised you can back it up to be honest as it sounds like you could duplicate it? :LOL:
The wallet is simply the key to access the funds on the network. No chance of duplication.

Re practice: Go to https://trade.oanda.com/ and it'll give you a sign in screen. Above user/pass you have a radio button to select Live or Practice. If you're already logged in and have money in the account and didn't put any in yourself, you're logged into the practice account.
 
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Dark Rider

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Ubuntu is fine, grab as recent a release (or an LTS version) as you can so that you can keep it up-to-date. You may want to keep it disconnected from the internet between transactions.
So offline box dedicated to only bitcoin trading? would a VM be sufficient?
If I never use it to mine coins then any cheap box is fine?
I don't think mining on a regular box I use for he wallet is worth anything right?
 

hariseldon

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So offline box dedicated to only bitcoin trading? would a VM be sufficient?
If I never use it to mine coins then any cheap box is fine?
I don't think mining on a regular box I use for he wallet is worth anything right?
A mostly-offline box dedicated to making any crypto transactions with your crypto of choice. You have to connect eventually but you reduce your attack surface this way. A VM is still ultimately running within a potentially compromised environment so there is that level of risk. For active trading on exchanges I'd suggest running Ubuntu from a USB stick or similar to give you a clean environment for trading. Consider the level of risk and requirements of your scenarios.

1. General computer use. You need Windows and the internet. This machine will be at risk of infection.
2. Crypto trading on exchanges. You need an uncompromised machine with a web browser. Booting from an ubuntu stick or dual-booting to Ubuntu can be a solution to this.
3. Crypto wallet management. You want to be offline as much as possible, only connecting to run transactions. This should be an uncompromised machine. This might be achieved with an ubuntu stick with persistent storage - it's possible to install ubuntu to USB - you should encrypt your home folder etc for security.

As for mining - you won't get rich from it but as I mentioned before if you have access to free electricity and some machines you don't mind setting to the task there are options that'll make you a few quid. Nicehash is probably the easiest as it'll flip between coins according to what pays the most and it'll pay you in bitcoin which can be transferred to your coinbase account free of charge. Nicehash has previously been hacked, so I would recommend moving your coins as soon as they reach the threshold for free transfer to coinbase. Mining won't get you rich - the people making money doing it are using dedicated ASIC hardware and even in those cases I'm not sure it's entirely profitable given how quickly the hashing difficulty jumps.
 
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GamingKaiju

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Hi guys.

So I built 2 mining machines a couple of years ago to mine ETH at the time BTC difficulty was way beyond what my machine was capable of. After watching all my hard work and money go down the drain with the crypto crash, I switched the miners off and left them off in fact they still in my loft/attic 2x12 gpu mining rigs just sat there.

anywhoo I check ETH price yesterday and was shocked to see it over $300 last I checked it went down to $100 and I turned off the rigs.

My question is are we seeing a re-emergence of crypto? Given all the bad shit that is going on in the world are investors looking into resources/crypto for future investments?
 

Dark Rider

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A mostly-offline box dedicated to making any crypto transactions with your crypto of choice. You have to connect eventually but you reduce your attack surface this way. A VM is still ultimately running within a potentially compromised environment so there is that level of risk. For active trading on exchanges I'd suggest running Ubuntu from a USB stick or similar to give you a clean environment for trading. Consider the level of risk and requirements of your scenarios.

1. General computer use. You need Windows and the internet. This machine will be at risk of infection.
2. Crypto trading on exchanges. You need an uncompromised machine with a web browser. Booting from an ubuntu stick or dual-booting to Ubuntu can be a solution to this.
3. Crypto wallet management. You want to be offline as much as possible, only connecting to run transactions. This should be an uncompromised machine. This might be achieved with an ubuntu stick with persistent storage - it's possible to install ubuntu to USB - you should encrypt your home folder etc for security.
So the best solution is a very cheap linux box dedicated to trading on exchanges and for my wallet and wallet management I use an ubuntu stick?
Also is it a good idea to use my wallet stick on the same box I use for trading on the exchanges (just with the stick of course not connected)?

As for mining - you won't get rich from it but as I mentioned before if you have access to free electricity and some machines you don't mind setting to the task there are options that'll make you a few quid. Nicehash is probably the easiest as it'll flip between coins according to what pays the most and it'll pay you in bitcoin which can be transferred to your coinbase account free of charge. Nicehash has previously been hacked, so I would recommend moving your coins as soon as they reach the threshold for free transfer to coinbase. Mining won't get you rich - the people making money doing it are using dedicated ASIC hardware and even in those cases I'm not sure it's entirely profitable given how quickly the hashing difficulty jumps.
Yes no free electricity so it is foolish to try it, what I meant is just let it mine while I'm trading on the exchanges and of course shut it when I finish trading.
 

hariseldon

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GamingKaiju GamingKaiju - hard to say. Any big movement will likely be driven by bitcoin first if history is any indicator. Honestly imo there's more money to be made trading than mining. Certainly mining wouldn't have paid for most of my kitchen. I think current global market conditions in my opinion favour gold, but that's just my opinion man. I'm no expert, just someone who learned some shit and made a few quid. Crypto is still at risk from government intervention into onramps. Big price spikes ulitimately depend on what happened in the 20k spike - granny buying bitcoin because she saw it mentioned on the news (in reality when you start seeing mainstream news coverage that's the time to sell).

Dark Rider Dark Rider - Could go the other way around. The stick ought to be safe if you're booting from it, provided BIOS hasn't been compromised - that is possible but honestly if you're down that level of paranoia you then start asking where the USB stick was made - you'll never feel fully safe. Everyone has a level of risk they're comfortable with. I'm comfy running linux boxes as I do it for a living so having an old raspi around for trading for instance is easy enough. A raspi might not work for wallets if you're looking at lots of shitcoins as some may not have clients for ARM chips (note that personally I don't recommend holding onto shitcoins long enough to need a wallet - they tend to be used for scalping only which means I only tend to have them for a few hours max). Note that you can run something like https://lubuntu.net/ on a super-low-powered machine, I mean a real old piece of shit computer, and it'll do a solid job due to its lighter desktop environment.

Ultimately your mix of tech is up to you - just consider the 3 risk levels mentioned above and allocate resources available to you accordingly. You could use a stick for your wallet, or you could have an old machine. My one warning with the USB stick is that I've had bad experiences with USB stick reliability - many are cheaply made and don't last forever. Losing a wallet with a lot of coins on it is a bad idea.
 
Dec 25, 2018
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I went onto the Oanda website to practise, but I read that they charge an Inactivity Fee? Should I be worried if I only want to use it to practice on?

I got a call from them as well about opening my account.
 
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hariseldon

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I went onto the Oanda website to practise, but I read that they charge an Inactivity Fee? Should I be worried if I only want to use it to practice on?

I got a call from them as well about opening my account.
If you only intend to practice just set up a practice account, not a live one - it won’t even need any payment info from you. I only have a practice account on there so nobody has ever rung me up. The practice account is doing ok so I should probably put real cash on the line some time.
 
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Dark Rider

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Dark Rider Dark Rider - Could go the other way around. The stick ought to be safe if you're booting from it, provided BIOS hasn't been compromised - that is possible but honestly if you're down that level of paranoia you then start asking where the USB stick was made - you'll never feel fully safe. Everyone has a level of risk they're comfortable with. I'm comfy running linux boxes as I do it for a living so having an old raspi around for trading for instance is easy enough. A raspi might not work for wallets if you're looking at lots of shitcoins as some may not have clients for ARM chips (note that personally I don't recommend holding onto shitcoins long enough to need a wallet - they tend to be used for scalping only which means I only tend to have them for a few hours max). Note that you can run something like https://lubuntu.net/ on a super-low-powered machine, I mean a real old piece of shit computer, and it'll do a solid job due to its lighter desktop environment.

Ultimately your mix of tech is up to you - just consider the 3 risk levels mentioned above and allocate resources available to you accordingly. You could use a stick for your wallet, or you could have an old machine. My one warning with the USB stick is that I've had bad experiences with USB stick reliability - many are cheaply made and don't last forever. Losing a wallet with a lot of coins on it is a bad idea.
You are absolutely right, bootable stick for exchanges is safer than the box OS used for exchanges, but is it secure enough that using the trading stick on the wallet box is fine?

I just want to note that your advice and patience it much appreciated mate.
 
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hariseldon

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You are absolutely right, bootable stick for exchanges is safer than the box OS used for exchanges, but is it secure enough that using the trading stick on the wallet box is fine?

I just want to note that your advice and patience it much appreciated mate.
So I'll summarise the tech a bit so you can make an educated decision.

If you dual-boot windows and linux on one machine... the Windows install can't read the linux side without you going and hunting for a driver to read EXT4 partitions, and if it's encrypted that will likely still not work. Any windows malware would need to install an EXT4 driver and figure out your encryption to get access to the linux side. Given dual-booting is fairly niche, malware makers haven't bothered as far as I know (remember they're after the low-hanging fruit that they can make money from). Your linux install can access any content on the windows side. The chances of picking up an infection that way are minimal.

If you boot from a CD/DVD live install of a linux distro... there is no persistent storage, so the state is fresh for each run. The disk is slow of course, but it's the ultimate clean setup if you're sure the CD/DVD is clean. You will however miss updates, which may mean vulnerabilities exist and aren't patched. There will be no password to log in, but with no persistent stored data to access this is less of a risk - there's not even a browser history. This can be useful for trading, though it does mean remembering all your passwords and having your 2FA stuff running on another device (likely a phone).

If you boot from a live USB image of a linux distro... then the host OS never boots, be it Windows or Linux. The properties of the host are thus irrelevant outside of the fact that from your USB live session you can access the contents of the host. While in theory it can be treated the same as the live CD/DVD above, a USB stick can be written to which means that if vulnerabilities do exist they can be exploited over multiple sessions. Additionally, one can configure a USB live session to have some persistent storage when burning the image to the USB stick. If I recall, the persistent storage is in a format that Windows PCs can read, meaning that if your USB stick is in the PC when you boot windows some risk is added there.

If you boot from a full linux installation on a USB stick.. then the host OS never boots, be it Windows or Linux. The properties of the host are thus irrelevant outside of the fact that you can access the contents of the host. You can update your installation easily and you can store content on it. This does however mean that hacks will persist from session to session. A linux machine is however inherently less likely to be hacked than a Windows one.

If you single-boot linux... basically the rules are similar to the full install on a USB stick. The storage is likely more robust as hard disks and SSD drives don't break as often as USB sticks.

* So, for using exchanges, live CD/DVD is probably the most secure, but a USB (live or installed) will likely be good enough, depending on your comfort level when dealing with risk.
* For storing wallets you need some persistent storage. Single-boot linux or USB install are the most secure but the USB install might die. Dual boot isn't too bad. Live CD/DVD isn't practical due to lack of persistent storage and live USB isn't a good idea because the persistent storage is visible from a Windows machine. A USB stick is easier to steal than a computer, physical security should be factored into your decision-making.

Note that nothing I say on here is financial advice - I know nothing about anything, this is just the ramblings of an escapee from a lunatic asylum so anything you do is at your own risk.
 
Dec 25, 2018
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If you only intend to practice just set up a practice account, not a live one - it won’t even need any payment info from you. I only have a practice account on there so nobody has ever rung me up. The practice account is doing ok so I should probably put real cash on the line some time.
I hope so as I just want to see how it works before I actually dip my toes into it as I want to research it all first.
 

Dark Rider

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So I'll summarise the tech a bit so you can make an educated decision.

If you dual-boot windows and linux on one machine... the Windows install can't read the linux side without you going and hunting for a driver to read EXT4 partitions, and if it's encrypted that will likely still not work. Any windows malware would need to install an EXT4 driver and figure out your encryption to get access to the linux side. Given dual-booting is fairly niche, malware makers haven't bothered as far as I know (remember they're after the low-hanging fruit that they can make money from). Your linux install can access any content on the windows side. The chances of picking up an infection that way are minimal.

If you boot from a CD/DVD live install of a linux distro... there is no persistent storage, so the state is fresh for each run. The disk is slow of course, but it's the ultimate clean setup if you're sure the CD/DVD is clean. You will however miss updates, which may mean vulnerabilities exist and aren't patched. There will be no password to log in, but with no persistent stored data to access this is less of a risk - there's not even a browser history. This can be useful for trading, though it does mean remembering all your passwords and having your 2FA stuff running on another device (likely a phone).

If you boot from a live USB image of a linux distro... then the host OS never boots, be it Windows or Linux. The properties of the host are thus irrelevant outside of the fact that from your USB live session you can access the contents of the host. While in theory it can be treated the same as the live CD/DVD above, a USB stick can be written to which means that if vulnerabilities do exist they can be exploited over multiple sessions. Additionally, one can configure a USB live session to have some persistent storage when burning the image to the USB stick. If I recall, the persistent storage is in a format that Windows PCs can read, meaning that if your USB stick is in the PC when you boot windows some risk is added there.

If you boot from a full linux installation on a USB stick.. then the host OS never boots, be it Windows or Linux. The properties of the host are thus irrelevant outside of the fact that you can access the contents of the host. You can update your installation easily and you can store content on it. This does however mean that hacks will persist from session to session. A linux machine is however inherently less likely to be hacked than a Windows one.

If you single-boot linux... basically the rules are similar to the full install on a USB stick. The storage is likely more robust as hard disks and SSD drives don't break as often as USB sticks.

* So, for using exchanges, live CD/DVD is probably the most secure, but a USB (live or installed) will likely be good enough, depending on your comfort level when dealing with risk.
* For storing wallets you need some persistent storage. Single-boot linux or USB install are the most secure but the USB install might die. Dual boot isn't too bad. Live CD/DVD isn't practical due to lack of persistent storage and live USB isn't a good idea because the persistent storage is visible from a Windows machine. A USB stick is easier to steal than a computer, physical security should be factored into your decision-making.
So the best option is two linux boxes, one for a wallet, the other for exchanges and wallet holders.
second best option is a linux box for my wallet and a live CD/DVD (new live CD/DVD whenever there is an update on the distro) for exchanges and wallet holders.
third best option is a linux box for my wallet and a full installation USB stick for exchanges and wallet holders.

did I get it right?
also with a full installation linux USB the host OS (windows or linux) cannot access my data on the USB installation?

Note that nothing I say on here is financial advice - I know nothing about anything, this is just the ramblings of an escapee from a lunatic asylum so anything you do is at your own risk.
Noted, of course I will not blame you for any mistakes I make :messenger_beaming:
 

hariseldon

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Dark Rider Dark Rider I've outlined what the technical options are, including their limitations. The decision on how to proceed is yours, not mine. It's your money after all. To succeed in crypto you need a bit of luck but also enough about you to go and figure things out, do research, etc. If I spoon-feed you then I'm weakening those skills, which runs the risk of throwing you to the lions and having people take your money. In crypto everyone wants to take your money, and that includes me. As much as I'd like to take your money however, I'd also like to see you become a competent trader and make a few quid (so long as it's not due to being on the other side of my trades). I've given you info and links, time for you to run free as the wind.
 

hariseldon

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I hope so as I just want to see how it works before I actually dip my toes into it as I want to research it all first.
Remember, they can only take your money if you've provided payment details. If you have set up an account that requires payment details it's not a demo account. You might want to remove the account until you are comfortable and have a proven track record from the demo trading.
 
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Dark Rider

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Dark Rider Dark Rider I've outlined what the technical options are, including their limitations. The decision on how to proceed is yours, not mine. It's your money after all. To succeed in crypto you need a bit of luck but also enough about you to go and figure things out, do research, etc. If I spoon-feed you then I'm weakening those skills, which runs the risk of throwing you to the lions and having people take your money. In crypto everyone wants to take your money, and that includes me. As much as I'd like to take your money however, I'd also like to see you become a competent trader and make a few quid (so long as it's not due to being on the other side of my trades). I've given you info and links, time for you to run free as the wind.
Thank you :messenger_sunglasses:
I'm going into a deep dive into it reading up everything as my time allows and start it when I'm finally comfortable with my knowledge. Thank you again, hopefully neither of us will be losing money to the other one :messenger_beaming:
 

hariseldon

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Thank you :messenger_sunglasses:
I'm going into a deep dive into it reading up everything as my time allows and start it when I'm finally comfortable with my knowledge. Thank you again, hopefully neither of us will be losing money to the other one :messenger_beaming:
Every time you win, someone else loses. Seek out and destroy your enemies. No mercy.

 
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prag16

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Just came back here to see if John McAfee is still planning on eating his own dick. He better start preparing.
 
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hariseldon

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What alt coins are you guys buying now?
Any hidden gems out there?
There are no gems among altcoins. There are scams that, with a bit of luck and timing, might make you a few quid, but there are no gems.
 
Mar 14, 2018
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I bought into the hype and made my first crypto purchase today - £20 worth of chain link. Dipping a toe in the proverbial water, as it were.

I think I missed the big rise in value, but I've heard people say it still has potential since people will be using it for smart contracts in the future.

Reading anything about crypto makes my head hurt. Most of it still seems like BS, and I can't see your average shit-muncher using this technology for every day purchases until it's massively simplified.
 

hariseldon

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A quick 10 second look at the charts for a bunch of coins on Binance (they have too many - it's become a shitcoin haven where being on Binance used to mean something). As of writing I don't hold positions in any of these so I'm not shilling my bags, but then I'm on the internet and talking about crypto so I'm almost certainly a lying shitbag who's trying to steal your money.

LINK - I'd say the current peak is the 2nd peak. RSI is lower by a long way, it's running out of steam and you'd be mad to buy.
ERD - Similar story to LINK.
BNB - Through July it had 2 daily peaks, the second higher price had a lower RSI indicating running out of steam and the third peak was a tad lower justifying that analysis. If it were to hit 17000 sats or close I'd want to buy as that's a well-supported level.
ADA - The recent increase is off not much volume when you look at prior trading. I don't trust it. Daily RSI below 50 - I wouldn't buy personally.
EOS - No price movement since May. However, building volume without movement is interesting, hinting at players accumulating ready to move the price and do a pump and dump. Currently at 2700 sats, with natural (non-manipulated movement) I could see it popping up to 3200. Interesting that the 3200 level was supported for a long time and then breached but nothing very dramatic happened. Not a great long term bet for me.
XTZ - Scamshit. Just had a pump and dump through July, probably a couple of months before it goes again. Might be worth quietly accumulating a small stash for the pump though the peaks are getting smaller indicating diminishing returns.
BAND - Pumping like a motherfucker. Do not buy. You've missed the fun bit. Note the lower daily RSI for the much higher second peak - ths one's running out of steam.
SXP - Not been around long so it's hard to say much about it - no predictions from me.
LEND - On a climb after a previous peak - RSI is in a good state, 5 and 10 day moving averages look good, this might actually not be a bad option.
LTC - Negative 5/10 day moving average crossover puts me off a bit especially as it's doing fuck all.
VET - see LEND
ZEC - has decent momenum - might be worth a punt.
KAVA - pumped - unsure about 2nd peak
XMR - Sitting at a level it's tried to break since Aug 2019 - briefly maanged it in Feb but back down again. Personally I'd short from here.
MANA - long history of very derpy movement (see April 2018 and July 2018). Heavily manipulated, fuck that shit.
AMB - running out of momentum imo. Lots of volume, not much movement, suggests that the big boys are selling once it hits certain levels.
ANKR - see LINK
DASH - breaking out of its Bolllinger Bands while maintaining a good RSI, had a long period of accumulation while sitting at a historic low. Worth a small punt possibly.
KNC - Nope.
BAL - 2nd day on binance, not enough history to comment
ALGO - could be about to start a 2nd pump - the 5/10MA crossver interests me and RSI is in the right place. Shape looks good.
ZIL - looks too manipulated for my tastes
VITE - Horrible chart - far too volatile to trust.
DOCK - Probably too late to jump on the pump without a lot of risk
IOST - I have a sneaking suspicion it might have a small pump coming up - 51 sats to 75ish. Trouble is with coins at this low value the risks are too big. It's an absolute shitcoin.
FET - I'm having trouble getting a good read on this one.
ENJ - a small pump is possible - 5/10MA cross as RSA crosses over 50 interests me.
XLM - Nope.
PERL - probably too late now, pumped
ARPA - not interesting
SOL - not enough data - if I had to guess I'd say it's topped out
COTI - not enough data - not a bet I'd like to take.
ATOM - looks like it's heading down.
XEM - Nope
BLZ - topped out - it's hit what was a previous long-term support. If you feel brave and want to take a punt, set your stop around 840 sats (it's at 1030) and hope it keeps going, but it's a risky bet.
CHR - not enough data
COMP - not enough data - too new - but dear god it just keeps going down. Not good for a new coin.
TOMO - see LINK
NEO - ETH-wannabe with smart contracts, been around forever, charts don't look amazing
TRX - scam. Nope.
MATIC - I'd say there's a decent chance of making some money on it, but not a huge amount. Stops at 145 sats if you do, target around 250 from current 185.
AVA - Pumping like a motherfucker - do NOT FOMO.
CELR - Might be worth a look - stop at 47 sats
WAVES - Absolute shit
QTUM - Not with a 20 foot pole
SYS - already pumped and dumped - you missed the boat
EVX - second peak with lower RSI than first and hitting a resistance already hit twice which was previously support hit several times. That said - yesterday closed above the resistance and if today's fallback tests the resistance but stays above lets say 3600 it might be worth a punt with tight stops.
ZRX - no buy signals that I'd trust
IOTA - nope
ETC - how the price hasn't dropped harder after a 51% attack with double-spend is anyone's guess. Idiots gonna idiot. You could speculate but it's risky. Do NOT HOLD ANY in your portfolio.
THETA - it's peaked, it's done.
LISK - hitting resistance as we speak. Nope.
BAT - used by the Brave browser. It's just sitting on a support line right now - might be an opportunity for a pump but I'm not seeing any other signals worth speaking of.
XVG - nope
OMG - always been very manipulated, nope.
STEEM - dead
DOGE - pumped - likely we won't see anything for a while now