Does anyone actually like American scones?

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#1
Dry bland ass triangles of nothing. Need like a gallon of liquid to eat one



Barf.

(uk scones with clotted cream, jam, and earl grey is delicious)

 
#4
I love chocolate chip scones. I had one just the other day, in fact. So delicious.

I've had UK scones too and they're tasty as well, but despite the name they're a totally different baked good.
 
#5
Where I live, this is what we call scones. Much better than the stuff in the OP. Sunday brunch staple, might have to get some later.

 

Suikoguy

I whinny my fervor lowly, for his length is not as great as those of the Hylian war stallions
#11
clotted cream sounds disgusting.
Probably good though
 
#20
Link that explains what that is? Wikipedia has no fucking idea.
From wikipedia:
In Utah, the bread products locally called "scones" are similar to Indian frybread and are made from a sweet yeast dough, with buttermilk and baking powder and/or soda added, and they are fried rather than baked. They are customarily served with butter and honey.​
 

Antiwhippy

the holder of the trombone
#23
What I don't get is the assertion that UK scones (the proper scones) aren't dry because they are dry as fuck, but the moisture come from the cream and jam which makes them delicious.
 
#24
From wikipedia:
In Utah, the bread products locally called "scones" are similar to Indian frybread and are made from a sweet yeast dough, with buttermilk and baking powder and/or soda added, and they are fried rather than baked. They are customarily served with butter and honey.​
Thanks. That's what I get for doubting the internet.
 
#26
What I don't get is the assertion that UK scones (the proper scones) aren't dry because they are dry as fuck, but the moisture come from the cream and jam which makes them delicious.
We don't eat them with anything generally, and you can't dunk them in coffee or whatever because they just fall apart
 
#29
Clotted cream (sometimes called clouted cream or Devonshire cream) is a thick cream made by indirectly heating full-cream cow's milk using steam or a water bath and then leaving it in shallow pans to cool slowly. During this time, the cream content rises to the surface and forms 'clots' or 'clouts'. It forms an essential part of a cream tea.
Seems easy enough to make at home.
 
#40
They made up a meal no one else follows to be number one at it. I give them credit for changing the game.

Part English, and enjoy some English things
Tea in the north means dinner, what a country

Also had no idea about the Utah fry bread scones.!
 
#43
Where I live, this is what we call scones. Much better than the stuff in the OP. Sunday brunch staple, might have to get some later.

This is what pops into my head when I read scones in the title as well. They are so damn tasty with butter/honey or used to make Navajo Tacos. Damn you jonhsmith now you got me craving some right now. I will have to see if I can get my hands on some when I get up now.

Oh on a side note mind blown that what I thought were known as scones worldwide is just a local Utah name.
 

A Pretty Panda

fuckin' called it, man
#44
OP have you ever actually had an American scone? I had one a while ago and besides the dumb name I liked it.

color, flavor, harbor, honor, humor, labor, neighbor, rumor
 
#45
OP have you ever actually had an American scone? I had one a while ago and besides the dumb name I liked it.

color, flavor, harbor, honor, humor, labor, neighbor, rumor
I made the thread because they were giving away scone samples at Starbucks. Although to be fair, all Starbucks pastries are terrible

Still it wasn't the first scone I've had and I can honestly say I've never enjoyed one.
 
#48
I made the thread because they were giving away scone samples at Starbucks. Although to be fair, all Starbucks pastries are terrible

Still it wasn't the first scone I've had and I can honestly say I've never enjoyed one.
Anything given away for free from starbucks is bound to be terrible.
 
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