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hariseldon

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Aug 22, 2018
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I think the issue is that people find it difficult to not fall to the extreme hate or love for something, especially on forums. Very few people are willing to offer, "I wish they added/changed X,Y, or Z but I am happy that they chose to take on this release regardless".
Forums contain a LOT of autism - myself included. Emotional regulation is never going to be great in that environment.
 

EHuntingon

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Jul 30, 2013
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I really am surprised Nintendo didn't go the port route instead. I'm not saying I know better, I'm just surprised they went with emulation. I would think that a Switch-native port would've let the games run better and allowed for further enhancements.

Edit: With the context of Jooxed Jooxed post, it now makes more sense.
 
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#Phonepunk#

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Sep 4, 2018
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Really looking forward to the All-Stars collection. I missed out on all these games at release until my friend got Galaxy. That game blew my mind, and I played through it and Galaxy 2 on emulator. It’s one of the main reasons I got a Switch.

Ended up finding used N64 and GameCube consoles for cheap in thrift stores so I played those last year as well. Both 64 and Sunshine are incredible.

I keep seeing people call Nintendo lazy but I’m just glad this will be a faithful re release. You can’t top perfection. Why mess with a masterpiece?
 

hariseldon

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Aug 22, 2018
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I really am surprised Nintendo didn't go the port route instead. I'm not saying I know better, I'm just surprised they went with emulation. I would think that a Switch-native port would've let the games run better and allowed for further enhancements.

Edit: With the context of Jooxed Jooxed post, it now makes more sense.
Tbh porting is bloody hard when dealing with what are likely VERY different hardware setups. Consider https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nintendo_64_technical_specifications vs https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nintendo_Switch#Technical_specifications - it's not just a matter of different CPU and GPU, they likely communicate with each other in different ways. It's also likely that few people are still around with the skills to understand N64 code (if the source even exists still) well enough to translate it into something suitable for the Switch. And the end result is that you have something that isn't portable - it won't work on another system.

In the IT world we're all moving towards emulation and containerisation - the idea of having code run in a controlled environment that may not match the host. My dev environment is in a virtual machine because I can't be arsed to set up a linux dual boot on my laptop and because I can copy that environment to different places, and the code I build runs on Docker to guarantee it'll work anywhere and always get a guaranteed environment, regardless of whatever else may be going on. With that in mind I can understand Nintendo's thinking here, and if it is a prelude to a virtual console N64 then it makes even more sense.
 
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A lot of N64 emulation has been done w/ core emulation but separate video packages. I know that they have off the shelf configurations for several games from Wii U. They have been iterating on the same emulator since the Ocarina of Time disc on GameCube. They could certainly use the emulator for Nintendo Switch Online but I wouldn't take the inclusion of those config files as anything more than the fact that they are reusing the same N64 emulator they've used in the past.

There is a thread on GAF-my quote post on the last page should link to it.
 
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ExpandKong

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Jan 9, 2018
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I really am surprised Nintendo didn't go the port route instead. I'm not saying I know better, I'm just surprised they went with emulation. I would think that a Switch-native port would've let the games run better and allowed for further enhancements.

Edit: With the context of Jooxed Jooxed post, it now makes more sense.
Honestly nevermind Switch Online games (which are of course one possibility) - if they've got a mind to do more collections (Zelda's 35th is next year after all) or even ports of N64/Wii/GameCube games in the future, it makes sense to just develop emulators now and use those (they might not have access to source code for some of those games anymore after all, so native ports would be impossible...if I understand it right).
 
May 18, 2020
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Honestly nevermind Switch Online games (which are of course one possibility) - if they've got a mind to do more collections (Zelda's 35th is next year after all) or even ports of N64/Wii/GameCube games in the future, it makes sense to just develop emulators now and use those (they might not have access to source code for some of those games anymore after all, so native ports would be impossible...if I understand it right).
Nintendo keeps very good records so I would assume they still have the source code for all of their games but ports take time and cost money. I assume they made the call to keep dev team working on new content and minimize the work on the collection. Better ROI elsewhere. If they aren't going to make significant updates/changes to the games then ports don't make sense.

The emulators they are using for GameCube and Wii are new, the 64 emulator has been around for years (Virtual Console).

The Wii emulator is actually part port and part emulation so interesting implications there.

For Zelda I would expect ports of Wind Waker and Twilight Princess from the Wii U version since they are newer vs going the emulation route. Emulation would be faster but they wouldn't have to do a ton of work after porting the Wii U versions; unlike Mario the games are already modern so a quicker port and no major updates/changes.

For Ocarina of Time/Majora's Mask. Emulation would be quick and easy. They could port the 3DS titles but unlike Wii U versions that would take some more work. I would say 50/50 on what they do here.

Skyward Sword would likely use the hybrid approach like Galaxy. Port the code and send audio + video to emulator. Would allow them to make some changes to the game without having to do a complete port.
 

Sub Boss

Member
Mar 6, 2013
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Tbh porting is bloody hard when dealing with what are likely VERY different hardware setups. Consider https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nintendo_64_technical_specifications vs https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nintendo_Switch#Technical_specifications - it's not just a matter of different CPU and GPU, they likely communicate with each other in different ways. It's also likely that few people are still around with the skills to understand N64 code (if the source even exists still) well enough to translate it into something suitable for the Switch. And the end result is that you have something that isn't portable - it won't work on another system.

In the IT world we're all moving towards emulation and containerisation - the idea of having code run in a controlled environment that may not match the host. My dev environment is in a virtual machine because I can't be arsed to set up a linux dual boot on my laptop and because I can copy that environment to different places, and the code I build runs on Docker to guarantee it'll work anywhere and always get a guaranteed environment, regardless of whatever else may be going on. With that in mind I can understand Nintendo's thinking here, and if it is a prelude to a virtual console N64 then it makes even more sense.
Nintendo leaving those GameCube processors behind was long overdue
 
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DESTROYA

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Jan 1, 2011
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Anyone know how long it takes to get stuff from playasia? I ordered Crystal Chronicles and they shipped it august 28th
About 7-10 days for me , you should of got it buy now.
Either that or the delivery guy is switch owner and now playing Crystal Chronicles .
 

StormCell

Gold Member
Dec 11, 2018
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In the IT world we're all moving towards emulation and containerisation - the idea of having code run in a controlled environment that may not match the host. My dev environment is in a virtual machine because I can't be arsed to set up a linux dual boot on my laptop and because I can copy that environment to different places, and the code I build runs on Docker to guarantee it'll work anywhere and always get a guaranteed environment, regardless of whatever else may be going on. With that in mind I can understand Nintendo's thinking here, and if it is a prelude to a virtual console N64 then it makes even more sense.
I knew there was some reason we get along so well!

Everything I write runs in a container on a pod in a kubernetes cluster.
 

hariseldon

Gold Member
Aug 22, 2018
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I knew there was some reason we get along so well!

Everything I write runs in a container on a pod in a kubernetes cluster.
I use Docker Compose because I’m too lazy to get Kubernetes working (and as I’ve lost 2 of my 3 developers while the third is on furlough so I’m doing 4 people’s work and don’t have time or energy to learn anything right now). Tbh once I’m back on an even keel I plan to get my head around it.

My stack (and I do the lot) is Spring/MySQL/Docker/Angular plus I’m doing UI design, maintenance and support for the old Struts application I’m building a replacement for, and a multitude of other crap. My brain is mush.
 
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StormCell

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Dec 11, 2018
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I use Docker Compose because I’m too lazy to get Kubernetes working (and as I’ve lost 2 of my 3 developers while the third is on furlough so I’m doing 4 people’s work and don’t have time or energy to learn anything right now). Tbh once I’m back on an even keel I plan to get my head around it.

My stack (and I do the lot) is Spring/MySQL/Docker/Angular plus I’m doing UI design, maintenance and support for the old Struts application I’m building a replacement for, and a multitude of other crap. My brain is mush.
You do all of those and still claim to have anything to do with IT. You are a full stack developer. Maybe it's a regional difference, but my team shuns anything to do with IT or the IT label. Only thing we don't collectively shun is the IT Crowd (that show was awesome).
 
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hariseldon

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Aug 22, 2018
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You do all of those and still claim to have anything to do with IT. You are a full stack developer. Maybe it's a regional difference, but my team shuns anything to do with IT or the IT label. Only thing we don't collectively shun is the IT Crowd (that show was awesome).
Absolutely I’m 100% a developer, but the small team means I have to keep servers upright etc (easier since I moved everything from a couple of half dead Centos 5 boxes to a couple of aws vms with Docker running on them). I just used IT as much of IT is on that path, for instance all our Exchange servers, MSSQL servers, etc are running in VM environments now.

The downside of my current predicament is that by being a jack of all trades I don’t sufficiently master some of them, and the Docker and AWS side is definitely where I’m weakest. Trouble is managing a team took up a lot of time and now doing the work of a whole team just leaves me knackered.

On the plus side they pay me a lot of money, above the average for what I’m doing by a decent margin, so I can’t complain too much.
 

StormCell

Gold Member
Dec 11, 2018
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Absolutely I’m 100% a developer, but the small team means I have to keep servers upright etc (easier since I moved everything from a couple of half dead Centos 5 boxes to a couple of aws vms with Docker running on them). I just used IT as much of IT is on that path, for instance all our Exchange servers, MSSQL servers, etc are running in VM environments now.

The downside of my current predicament is that by being a jack of all trades I don’t sufficiently master some of them, and the Docker and AWS side is definitely where I’m weakest. Trouble is managing a team took up a lot of time and now doing the work of a whole team just leaves me knackered.

On the plus side they pay me a lot of money, above the average for what I’m doing by a decent margin, so I can’t complain too much.
Same.

So-called DevOps.

That's really cool though.

And no I don't have anything against IT. Developers just hate being asked to fix broken computers and jammed printers. A lot of companies hire developers and think they're basically the same as IT.
 
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hariseldon

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Aug 22, 2018
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Same.

So-called DevOps.

That's really cool though.

And no I don't have anything against IT. Developers just hate being asked to fix broken computers and jammed printers. A lot of companies hire developers and think they're basically the same as IT.
I wish I knew enough about ops to properly call myself that - generally I just have to learn enough to get stuff running then go put out the next fire!

Thankfully nobody accosts me for printer repairs as I’ve gained a deserved reputation for grumpiness and we have a couple of guys looking after all the servers not related to my projects. One is a Communist but otherwise they’re good blokes.
 

StormCell

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Dec 11, 2018
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I wish I knew enough about ops to properly call myself that - generally I just have to learn enough to get stuff running then go put out the next fire!

Thankfully nobody accosts me for printer repairs as I’ve gained a deserved reputation for grumpiness and we have a couple of guys looking after all the servers not related to my projects. One is a Communist but otherwise they’re good blokes.
For years, that was my team flying by the seat of our pants. We finally hired someone who wants to focus entirely on infrastructure and Kubernetes setup. He's been with us for more than a year in this role and it looks like a full time responsibility at minimum.

I'm just glad I don't have to think too much about instance sizes and such since we have our cluster guru.

The downside to all this knowledge is that with all the hiring Nintendo did, I can't help but wonder what all those cloud engineers are actually doing. I want to be a fly on the wall of those executive meetings just to know what Nintendo talks about when they discuss cloud services. lol
 
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Danny Dudekisser

I paid good money for this Dynex!
Oct 13, 2008
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Cancelled my All-Stars physical preorder. I don't care about making a little skrilla by reselling it, and I want it digital anyway. No interest in keeping the physical copy, because it's hardly anything special outside of the artificial scarcity.

Which reminds me that I need to sell my useless Bayonetta 1+2 physical copy.
 
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-Vyse-

Formerly 'VysePSU'
May 9, 2019
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So I'm planning to purchase a Switch Lite next month and get back to some handheld Nintendo gaming with Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.

What are you guys looking forward to playing this holiday season?
 
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Sub Boss

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Mar 6, 2013
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So I'm planning to purchase a Switch Lite next month and get back to some handheld Nintendo gaming with Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.

What are you guys looking forward to playing this holiday season?
Im looking forward to playing Anmesia Rebirth and DOOM Eternal on Halloween 🎃

I feel like there is still a major announcement from Nintendo for December, its still not TGS week i bet they are planning to drop feed us something
 
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