IronGAF Cookoff (hosted by OnkelC)

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Wes

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May 14, 2006
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What is that slicing device you're using there? It looks like no knife a meer mortal would use.
 

CountZeroInt

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Onkel, I showed your threads to my wife and even her mother and they both were saying "woooooowww" and "ohh that looks so good!", and unfortunately even "Why can't you cook like that?"
 

Ashodin

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My contribution to the new thread, finally! I've been waiting to try this out.

What follows is a simple recipe, requiring the basest of materials, so if you're scrapped and looking for something to eat, go ahead and try this. Be warned however, as this food I've made is for people with more ... open tastes.

This is also a family recipe - it's been handed down from my mother's mother to her, and to myself. My two other brothers have no interest in really making it, but I enjoy making it because it's easy, and it's fun to experiment with.

I call it Macaroni and Tomato Juice. Very simple name.

Let's start first by getting the necessary ingredients:





Get some water in a pot (doesn't have to be a set amount - just put as much water as you need in the pot for the amount of food you want to make) and put it on the stove on the HIGH setting for quick boiling.



Ah here we go - now let's wait for the pot to boil after 10 minutes.



Time to put in the Macaroni. This part can be your own flavor - you can put in different kinds of pasta to substitute with Macaroni. Spaghetti works, Penne works, Shells work, and most other kinds of pasta work. Though the time required to get them soft enough from the water may vary.



I chose Macaroni, of course. Remember to set the heat to about half of whatever your HIGH setting is, or the pot will boil over.



After about 10 minutes on the stove for the Macaroni, it should be soft enough to eat. Remove the pot from the stove, and we're going to need... something...



Ah here it is! We need the colander to drain the water from the Macaroni in the sink. Once you've done that, put the Macaroni back on the stove.



Pour in that tomato juice! I find the best kind is Campbell's - Hunt's or any other kind has a slight tinge to them. And please, make sure you get the kind with salt included - otherwise later on you're going to have to add a ton of salt!



Use butter to mix into the tomato juice to give it a more sweetened taste. Again, as with the tomato juice, margarine or any other butter substitute can work, but it will change the flavor of the tomato juice DRAMATICALLY. So for this, I use Country Crock (it's Light butter, but I myself would probably use regular, if not for my parents wanting Light versions of foods).



After you dump in the butter, go ahead and grab your nearest salt and pepper shakers and give them a good three or four hard shakes into the pot. This is what it should look like so far. Tasty, no?



Mix it for a while and this is what your result should be. I don't know if you can see it, but the butter is melted and permeates the top layer of the tomato juice quite well, lightening up the tone of the tomato juice overall.



It makes as much as you put into it, but the basic amount is about 3 bowls worth, maybe 4. So it pretty much can feed a whole small family if you're prepared enough.



Happy Eating!
 

OnkelC

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Thanks to you all for the kind words so far. :)

Maxrpg, that looks like a fine and fast dish, I imagine the taste to be a bit like the tomato sauce that the wife loves so much.

Some decent and fast to make dishes are a welcome addition to this humble thread, please keep them coming.
 

Ashodin

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I agree! Lots of your dishes in here are big time-sinking dishes that are for either a large group of people, or take hours to make. I am glad to show off the dishes I know that take very little to make.
 

jarosh

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oh teh noes! the index in your old thread is not working :(

you manually changed the postcount numbers. but that's not how the database works. postcount is just "decoration". the actual post is in the "showpost.php?p=1111111" part of the link.
 

OnkelC

Hail to the Chef
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jarosh said:
oh teh noes! the index in your old thread is not working :(

you manually changed the postcount numbers. but that's not how the database works. postcount is just "decoration". the actual post is in the "showpost.php?p=1111111" part of the link.

I am working on it. Thanks for the hint.

Edit:
It is fixed now. Or so I hope ;)
 

Cornballer

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Woohoo! New year, new thread. I'm looking forward to reading more of everyone's recipes, and I'll post soon when I cook something postworthy.

Thanks for the index, Onkel.
 

OnkelC

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So, let's cook.
:D

As a starter for the new year, I made some "Frankfurter Grüne Soße" (Herbal Green Sauce, Frankfurt Style)
It is a regional specialty in the greater Frankfurt Area, usually served alongside hard boiled eggs and potatoes. This rich and creamy, cold-prepared sauce also serves great as a dip or relish and goes along well with all kinds of meat, poultry and fish.
The main ingredient is a bunch of fresh herbs, which can vary in number and amount to your personal taste. As with most traditional German dishes, there are many ways of preparation, all possible herbs are listed in the above Wiki Link.
I used the following herbs (clockwise from top left to bottom left):


parsley,
taragon,
cress,
chervil,
lemon balm,
borage,
chives,
sorrel and dill.

I prepared the sauce to go alongside some cold cuts and fried potatoes yesterday. We had the leftover sauce with some fish fillets and mashed potatoes today. These are the ingredients for two persons, with enough sauce for 2 days (sauce can be stored in the fridge):


one bunch of mixed herbs,
250 grams (1/2lb) mayonnaise,
200 grams (7oz) of sour cream,
100 mililitres (3-4 flOz) of cream,
2 medium to large hard boiled eggs,
2 tablespoons hot mustard,
3 shallots,
one tablespoon of white wine vinegar,
salt, pepper and sugar,

side dishes of choice.

Preparation is simple and fast, but the sauce should rest for at least one to two hours so the herbs can unlock their full flavor.

First, mix the mayonnaise, cream and sour cream, add the mustard and spice with salt, pepper and sugar:





Now cut the herbs, cube the eggs and shallots and mix them in:



Add the vinegar and spices until it tastes right, then let the sauce rest at room temperature for one to two hours (you can let it rest overnight in the freezer for best taste):


Finish Line:
Now prepare the side dishes:




DONE!
Serve alongside with the potatoes and coldcuts (we had some pork roast and roast beef to go alongside it):






Enjoy!
 

heavy liquid

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I love the "GAF" written with the mustard!

Looks good OnkelC! I hope to have something in the next day or two to post. :)
 

ChryZ

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Hey ... new thread, "old" recipe, kinda: I've made a korean dish called "dwenjang jjigae" and posted it in Vol1. I got a few things wrong, even though it is/was tasty, it's just not a appropriate recipe for dwenjang jjigae. So I re-did the whole thing and corrected my "mistakes". I wasn't paying a lot of attention to authenticity back then, but this should be okay:

Dwenjang Jjiigae



A stew made from fermented soybean paste in anchovy broth with a variety of vegetable, meat or seafood.

ingredients

1 X big potato (quartered, thinly sliced)
1 X firm tofu (cubed)
1 X paengee beosut (enoki mushrooms, optional)
4 X dried anchovy
1 X red chili (sliced)
1 X zucchini (quartered, sliced)
3 X scallion (sliced)
3 X garlic clove (quartered)
1 X dasima (dried kelp, optional)
150 G pork (5.25 oz, thinly sliced, optional)
6 CUP water
1-2 CUP cooked rice
3-4 TBSP dwenjang (bean paste)
1 TBSP gochujang (red chili paste)
1 TBSP gochugaru (red chili flakes)
2 TBSP sesame oil (pressed from roasted seeds)

banchan #1 ingredients (side-dish, warm chrysanthemum salad, optional)

1 X bunch gughwasog (chrysanthemum leaves, shungiku)
1 X garlic clove (crushed)
2 TBSP veg oil
1 TBSP gochugaru (red chili flakes)

banchan #2 ingredients (side-dish, purple coleslaw, optional)

1 X half red cabbage (shredded)
2 TBSP veg oil
2 TBSP rice wine vinegar
1 TSP soy sauce
1/2 TSP honey or sugar
1 TSP salt and pepper (more or less)

no pics of the coleslaw prep, just shred the cabbage and mix with the other banchan #2 ingredients,
best done a couple of hours in advance, the coleslaw needs some time to develop its full flavour

first some slicing and dicing



gently saute the pork in one table-spoon of sesame oil, remove from pot, add water, garlic and kelp



bring to boil, then lower heat and simmer for 15 min, remove spend kelp and anchovies



add dwenjang and gochujang to a fine colander and dip it into the broth



stir dwenjang and gochujang in the colander to dissolve them



remove the colander with the chunky remains (optional, if you like it crunchy)



add potato, zucchini, scallion, pork, red chili and tofu



simmer until the potato and zucchini chunks are done



trim and clean chrysanthemum greens



saute crushed garlic and red chili flakes



add chrysanthemum greens and turn until slightly wilted



serve warm chrysanthemum salad topped with roasted sesame seeds and another drizzle of sesame oil



serve dwenjang jjiigae with enoki mushrooms, rice and sidedishes





enjoy
 

OnkelC

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ChryZ! Welcome, a happy new year and a hearty



for the awesome ragout. it is good to have you on board, please continue contributing.

But now for another main event:

Special Announcement!
Cooks and Passionate Eaters on NeoGAF, I proudly present you:

Volume 1 of "Food For Thoughts", the long-awaited pdf magazine of the home-style cooking threads!

Fellow GAffers Jacobi and heavy liquid have gone great lenghts to produce a wonderfully illustrated magazine series from the volumes 1 and 2 of the previous threads.

GIVE THEM A BIG APPLAUSE!
Especially to Jacobi who got the whole thing rolling and spent nearly the whole last year to produce it.

Volume 1 of "food for thoughts" covers some assorted recipes from volume one, further issues will be published in the near future. There is also a dedicated print version in the making, with a handmade cover and all. Bow to the Apes of Jacobi!

A BIG THANK YOU to the both of you!:)

An here it is:
http://rapidshare.com/files/10231644/FFT_Vol1.01.pdf

rehosted on megaupload:

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=JIMNWROC


Feel free to download and/or rehost it, we appreciate it!

If anyone is interested in having his or her posted dishes featured in it, please give a short post here.

Enjoy!

And share your thoughts, please.
 

Cornballer

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Jul 21, 2006
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The pdf looks great! Cool idea to compile a few recipes and put them in there. I'm going to print it out and put it on the shelf w/ my cookbooks. Keep up the good work. :)

EDIT: By the way, not to nitpick on a fine piece of work, but you might look into reducing the file size a bit if you have a chance. I ran it quickly through acrobat and got it down to about 7.2 MB without too much trouble. Let me know if you want a copy.
 

Jacobi

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Jun 11, 2004
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Thanks ^^
Nowadays everyone has DSL, so I didn't reduce the file size :)
PLZ wait for the print version to print it out, it'll have a cover and stuff ;)
 

ant1532

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Dec 21, 2005
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Lazy food:

Cheese Sandwich

Step 1 : Get a slice of cheese
Step 2 : Get bread
Step 3 : Heres where it gets tricky, place the cheese in between the two slices of bread

Step 4 : Eat.

 

ChryZ

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Jun 21, 2004
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OnkelC said:
ChryZ! Welcome, a happy new year and a hearty



for the awesome ragout. it is good to have you on board, please continue contributing.
:lol

To all those who were involved with the PDF: good job! Breaking it down into volumes is definitely the way to go. Using the avatars adds a nice touch.
 

OnkelC

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DarkJediKnight, thank Maxrpg for that nice sauce. He promised some more fast dishes, I am looking forward to it.

I found that tomato juice is a nice alternative to canned tomatoes in a variety of sauces, especially when cooking for one or two persons.

ant1532 said:
Lazy food:

Cheese Sandwich

Step 1 : Get a slice of cheese
Step 2 : Get bread
Step 3 : Heres where it gets tricky, place the cheese in between the two slices of bread

Step 4 : Eat.

Awesome. Is that you in the video of the preparation?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W_GtSb7nrqc
 

tnw

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Nov 6, 2006
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ChryZ said:


drool, I love Chige (or whatever you call it in korean). Soooo good.

I thought I would show a few New Year's foods that they eat in Japan.

When you do your first temple visit of the year (hatsumode), a lot of people drink Amazake a traditional slightly sweet, low-alcoholic Japanese drink made from fermented rice.

It's really good!

During the Japanese new year, they also eat osechi, a box of foods that are usually cured or preserved. lots of pickles and simmered foods.



the black beans in osechi are my favorite



It's also very popular to eat mochi during the new year season. Mochi is rice that is pounded until it forms a solid mass and shaped into cubes. You then grill the mochi, it puffs up a lot and you brush soy sauce on it. I really like it.

 

bovo

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Sep 9, 2005
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OnkelC said:
If anyone is interested in having his or her posted dishes featured in it, please give a short post here.
You're welcome to use any of the small selection I made.



My first post in the new thread is this dish I made at the end of last year, and can't really remember what went in it, but here are some (a lot of) photos anyway... I've also used flickr for first time, so hopefully the pictures will show up.

It's a vegetable casserole - suitable for northern europeans, but with suet dumplings guaranteed to clog the arteries of the rest of the world. (It also doesn't look very pretty, but it tastes nice, which is what counts...)

Ingredients are: various vegetables (I remember potato, swede, parsnips, carrots, onion, leeks and celery - there may have been others), sage and thyme, butter, flour and cider (using the worldwide definition, not the prohibition-era US definition) for the sauce, and flour, vegetable suet and water for the dumplings (not pictured).



Chopped vegetables are added to pan (I didn't have a flameproof casserole at the time - I do now so next time I'll use that!). Depending on cooking time they are added sooner or later (I forget which went in when - sorry). Herbs are added, and its all cooked on cooker top for about 30 minutes.



(The diet coke is not part of the recipe!)



Meanwhile, I made a roux (butter and flour heated in pan - see previous volumes!) and stirred in cider to make the sauce.





Everything was transfered to an oven proof dish, and went in the oven for about 1.5 hours.




Dumplings take about 30 minutes to cook. Normally they would go in the oven with everything else, but there wasn't room so I cooked them seperately in a pan of vegetable stock.

Shredded suet and flour (1 part to 2 parts) are mixed with water to from a dough, which is formed in to balls, and they are boiled for around 20 minutes.





I added them to the casserole dish to finish off cooking in the oven.



When it's done, remove from the oven and serve.



Finished. I should have split one of the dumplings to show that they are fluffy inside, but didn't - you'll just have to take my word for it :)

 

OnkelC

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tnw and bovo, thank you for your contributions. Keep'em coming!

Concerning the Japanese ney years dishes and beverage, I read about regular casualties after the consumption of mochi in the newspaper the other day, are they really that dangerous/sticky?

For the Magazine/pdf, fellow GAFfer Hyoushi has been so kind to compress it a bit. He hosted it here:

http://www.capitaltrachea.se/gaf/FFT_Vol1_01.pdf

Thanks Hyo!
 

OnkelC

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So, let's cook.

For the second day of Christmas, we had a large portion of the family around and we had to prepare lunch for 9 persons. Turkey was the dish of choice, as it can be prepared without too much hassle. One person did not like poultry, so we cooked some pork medaillons for her.
These were the ingredients:
one medium sized turkey (about 3-4 kilograms),


Side dishes:

2 kilograms of potatoes,
1 kilogram of carrots,
500 grams of mushrooms,
500 grams of leek,
2 litres of vegetable broth,
half a litre of red wine,
100 grams of butter (not pictured).

The preparation is really simple, but takes about two to four hours, depending on the size/weight of the bird.

Put the broth and wine into a deep oven pan, place the salted and peppered turkey on a grill above it. Roast it for roughly three hours at 170 degrees celsius while glazing it with the liquid butter occasionally:




After about two hours, cut the carrots and add them and half of the potatoes to the broth in the oven pan; repeat with the leek and mushrooms after 30 minutes:






After another 30 minutes, boil the remaining the potatoes. We prepared the pork medaillons with some potato croquettes and broccoli, too:




When the turkey is done (it is done when it looks irresistible and no liquids are coming out of its inside when you tilt it), add the contents of the oven pan to the boiled potatoes and heat it:



Finish Line:
tranche the turkey


DONE!

Serve with some of the gravy and the roast side dishes:


Enjoy! from Bonn.
 

heavy liquid

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Wow, great dishes already! Yeah, OnkelC... where's the turducken? :lol I really would like to see that sometime. Maybe I'll cook one sometime. :)

So tonight I made Lamb Biryani

Ingredients:

1 pound lamb, trimmed and cubed
4 teaspoons vegetable oil
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 onions, halved and sliced 1/2 inch thick
8 garlic cloves, sliced thin
2 jalapeno chiles, stemmed, seeded and minced
1 tablespoon cumin
2 tablespoons grated ginger
1 cup water
2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
2 cups bismati rice
2 cinnamon sticks
2 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro
1/2 teaspoon saffron threads, crumbled
1/2 teaspoon cardamom

You'll need a skillet and a pressure cooker for this recipe.

Slice your onions and garlic. Prepare your spices. Note that I didn't use the jalapeno, and I was out of fresh ginger and cilantro, so I used dried.





Cut up the lamb, and season it with salt and pepper.





Heat 2 teaspoons of the oil in a skillet over medium-high heat until just smoking. Brown the lamb on both sides, and then transfer to a clean plate.









Add the remaining 2 teaspoons of the oil and butter to the skillet over medium-high heat until the butter has melted. Add the onion and cook until it's soft and dark brown around the edges, around 10 minutes or so.







Stir in the garlic, jalapenos, cumin and 1 tablespoon of the ginger, and cook for 30 seconds.





Stir in the water, scraping up any browned bits, then pour into the cooker pressure.







Stir the chicken broth, rice, currants and cinnamon sticks into the pressure cooker. Arrange the lamb on top of the rise and press lightly to partially submerge.











Lock the lid in place and bring to high pressure over high heat. Cook for exactly 4 minutes, adjusting the heat as necessary to maintain high pressure.



Remove the pressure cooker from the heat. Allow the pressure to naturally release for 8 minutes, then quick release any remaining pressure.



Carefully remove the lid, allowing the steam to escape away from you. Stir the cilantro, saffron, cardamom and remaining tablespoon of ginger into the pot, and season with salt and pepper to taste.





Replace the lid (don't lock) and let the rice sit off the heat until it's completely tender, about 2 minutes. Discard the cinnamon sticks and transfer to a serving dish Done!









Optional: Serve with some hot naan and/or some yogurt sauce.

Yogurt sauce:

1 cup plain yogurt
2 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro
2 tablespoons minced fresh mint
1 garlic clove, minced
salt and pepper

The yogurt sauce is really nice, and helps to mellow the spiciness of the dish. I didn't have any yogurt sauce or naan, however. :(
 

ChryZ

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Cornballer said:
:lol Have any GAFers ever tried turducken? I've always been intrigued by the concept...
heavy liquid said:
Wow, great dishes already! Yeah, OnkelC... where's the turducken? :lol I really would like to see that sometime. Maybe I'll cook one sometime. :)
If you guys like the concept of stuffing animals matryoshka-style with other species then this will blow your mind:

http://www.snopes.com/food/prepare/camel.asp
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whole_stuffed_camel

:lol

heavy liquid said:
So tonight I made Lamb Biryani
Nice! I'm trying to get Goan Pork Vindaloo right at the moment, but I'm not 100% happy with it yet :-\



The naan turned out well though:

Cumin Naan

ingredients

2 CUP wheat flour
1/3 CUP yogurt
1 X egg
3 TBSP yeast (3/4 block)
2 TBSP butter (melted)
3 TBSP milk
1 TBSP cumin seed (not roasted, the baking will take care of that)
1/2 TSP salt
1 TSP onion powder

melt butter, add yogurt and milk, this mix should be lukewarm, then add the yeast



combine the dry naan ingredients, add egg and butter/milk/yogurt/yeast-mix and knead to a nice dough ball



cover the dough and let rise for 30 min in a warm place, it will rise ~15-30%



preheat oven to 250C (480F), leave a baking tray in it, quarter dough, roll out and sprinkle with cumin seeds



bake the naans until gold brown



this shouldn't take longer than 5-10 min



they'll puff up while baking and puff down to flatbread once they've cooled down, they keep warm up to 60 min when
wrapped into a clean kitchen towel, when they are cool the next day it's possible to warm them up with 60 seconds
of mirowaving and they are as good as new
 

Sumidor

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Cornballer said:
:lol Have any GAFers ever tried turducken? I've always been intrigued by the concept...
I only heard of this glorious thing last thanksgiving.. Next year though.. I SHALL HAVE IT!

And OnkelC, I love these threads, if I ever become rich enough, would you like to become my personal chef? I'll pay well, considering i'll be rich and all.
 

OnkelC

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Serious dishes, thank you BlueTsunami (prep pics and description would be nice), heavy liquid, Sumidor and ChryZ!

I was soo psyched to cook the stuffed camel RIGHT NOW, check the hole I already dug for the fireplace:


but the fun-killing butcher said that he had no camel in stock:D , so it'll be Schnitzel with kohlrabi today and Original (as in "with genuine home-made Spätzle") Swabian Käsespätzle with a cucumber salad for Sunday.

To get the niveau down a bit, let's have some "Fun With Fish Fingers" for the afternoon:






Homemade Fillet o'fish with sauce tartare from Maille!

And some hake with the leftover green sauce and some mashed potatoess:


Enjoy!

Edit: Sumidor, it's all a question of the wage. ;)
 

heavy liquid

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Okay!

Tonight I made Panade of Leeks and Mixed Greens with Cantal Cheese

This was my first time making this dish, and it was taken from the excellent book The Slow Mediterranean Kitchen: Recipes for the Passionate Cook, by Paula Wolfert

This is such a great recipe. This dish is French in origin, and happens to be very simple and healthy, although it does take a bit of time to cook. Set aside a weekend afternoon like I did, or you can also prepare it over two nights. It's a delicious winter "soup", and thick enough to hold a fork straight up. I say "soup" because it's almost more like a casserole, it's so thick. Onions, greens, soaked bread layered with milk, stewed leeks, and cheese are all slowly baked in a wide, glazed earthenware dish until they bind. The mixed leafy greens and cheese give this dish a great look, bubbling and golden brown on top. The choice of bread is crucial here. Pick a good chewy bread with a soft crust. Slow cooking will make it silky and soft. Pass a pepper mill.

When all you have is old bread and some milk, a couple of onions and a hunk of rapidly hardening cheese, the provincial panade is the savory butterfly that emerges from the austerest of cocoons.

Rumored to be the precursor of the classic French onion soup, the panade is like a caramelized onion bread pudding. Soft and satisfying, this dish is excellent comfort food for kicking around the house and recharging the mettle.



Ingredients:

3 large leeks (white and light green parts only), chopped
1 red onion, chopped
5 green garlic shoots or 8 to 10 garlic cloves, sliced
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1-pound loaf stale chewy bread with crust
1 1/2 pounds (about 10 cups) mixed leafy greens (sorrel, chard, parsley leaves, arugula, spinach, and watercress), deribbed and shredded
Juice of 1/2 lemon
Freshly ground pepper
Grated nutmeg
3 cups whole milk, heated to simmering
1/2 pound Cantal or Gruyère cheese

This is everything, but note that I forgot to show the milk, parsley, and garlic in this pic. Oops.


Cut the bread into 1-inch cubes. You should have about 2 quarts. Spread the cubes in one layer on an oiled baking sheet and bake for 45 minutes, or until just golden. Let cool and store until ready to use.



Cut all of your veggies. You only want to use the white and light green part of the leeks.





De-rib (cut out the stems) the mixed greens and shred them.

Chard:



Parsley:



Red onion:



Sliced garlic:



You'll have to take my word that I deribbed and shredded the other mixed greens. :)

In a 7- or 8- quart pot, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Slowly stew the leeks, onion, and garlic for 10 minutes. Add 1 teaspoon salt and cook for 5 more minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 250°F (120°C).



Add the greens to the pot, cover, and cook over low heat for 45 minutes.



Uncover and boil away excess liquid. Allow to cool.



Add the lemon juice, pepper, and nutmeg to taste. Correct the salt. (Up to this point the recipe can be prepared 1 day in advance. Cool, cover, and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature before continuing.)



Oil a deep 3-quart casserole, preferably earthenware. Place one-third of the bread cubes in the dish, top with half the greens, and repeat, ending with the bread cubes and patting lightly to make an even topping.





Gradually pour the hot milk down the insides and over the top of the panade so everything is moist. If necessary, add 1/2 cup water.



Cover with the grated cheese and a sheet of foil.



Bake in a preheated 250°F (120°C) oven for 1 3/4 hours.



Raise the oven temperature to 400°F (200°C), uncover, and bake 20 more minutes.



Remove from the oven and allow to relax for about 10 minutes before serving.

Finished!! Enjoy:







 

OnkelC

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Nice casserole, heavy liquid! Thank you very much for this fine contribution. I would like to cook more frequently with chard and spinach, but the wife loathes them :(

Instead of making Schnitzel yeasterday, I was lured into the local fast food joint by some tv commercial. This is how they said it would look like:


But the reality was kinda harsh:


I call this a "Falling Down" movie moment:




Fun thing is that a lot of people seem to feel the same, as the above scene in the Whammy burger place is most recited one in the nets.


It would be nice to see some advertisement / Real World comparisons of the other burger or fast food chains in here, so next time some of you grab a grub, please take some pics and share them.

For the record, this is what the Fillet o'fish looked like:


Tonight will be Schnitzel time, promised.
 

KoffiiKat

Member
Sep 29, 2006
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Cooked up a little something today for the ol' family, which also happens to be one of my favourite dishes, the Volcano Pot. :)

One of its strengths is its versatility. It can be used with rice (as a sort of risotto, I guess), pasta (including lasagna), in a pizza, with pita bread, etc.

Ingredients (for 2-3 people):



1 sizable onion
400 grammes of ground meat*
1 can of canned tomatoes
1 can of canned kidney beans (the red kind - I always include them but consider them optional)
Bouillon powder (the kind you make broth from - I prefer the darker meat bouillon variety)
Black pepper
Paprika powder
Thyme
1 or 2 cloves of garlic

(*: You can also use a vegetarian substitute. In this case you will need to add some water during cooking, as this contains much less water than real ground meat.)

(Note that the pictures show that I skipped the kidney beans to honour my family's wishes and made twice as much as listed above in this instance, since we are 5 people.)

Chop the onion into small pieces and fry them lightly in a pot.



Add the ground meat and fry it too. In the beginning it will actually resemble boiling more than frying because of the water contained within. But after a while the water is gone and you'll have to stir it every now and then. (Also, this is generally the best time to start boiling the water for rice or pasta if that's what you're planning.) The result should look something like this:



Add the tomatoes (and beans if you're using them). Crush the tomatoes (but not the beans).



Add the spices (this is the part where you'll want to taste the dish and spice it up as needed):



Crush the garlic using a garlic press and add it. The end result should look something like this:



In this instance I made the risotto variety (boiled rice on the side and added it at the end).



I actually make this every so often, since it only takes about 30 minutes and one of these can easily last me 2 days, dinner-wise if I'm eating it alone. :)
 

heavy liquid

Member
Jun 6, 2004
5,405
3
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Looks tasty, KoffiKat! It's basically a chili, right? I loooove chili. The spicier the better!

Tonight I'm making the long-promised Beer-Braised Short Ribs!

I've been meaning to make this dish since the middle of Home-Style Cooking Vol. 2, but it kept getting delayed, mostly due to the holidays. But I'm happy to say that it's cooking right now! I probably won't post the dish until tomorrow, as it's a slow cooker recipe and won't be done until late tonight. It's also better to prepare this dish a day or two before serving it, because the ribs taste better when reheated in the defatted brasing liquid.

That said, here's a teaser! :)







Full recipe tomorrow!
 
Not so much a full recipe as a trick to be used in others. I frequently make some sort of noodle dish, improvising depending on what noodles/flavoring/meats/whatever we have around. One time we had some leftover fried chicken livers. While I like them well enough alone, as chunks in a cheesy dish it didn't seem the greatest idea. However, I found that if I grated some up finely enough, it mixed in with the sauce to give it a really rich flavor. In the future when not wanting to wait for leftover status I just boiled the liver first.

However, attempting the same thing in a tomato-based sauce resulted in turning it into a thick brown. I won't repeat that.
 

PhoenixDark

Banned
Sep 25, 2005
68,178
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I have a challenge for you guys. OnkelC gave me an interesting idea for cooking potatoes, but I want to get more.

Basically I like cutting them up and putting them up and frying them in a pan along with onions. What are some good ideas on how to do this and make them nice and hashy?
 

KoffiiKat

Member
Sep 29, 2006
107
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heavy liquid said:
Looks tasty, KoffiKat! It's basically a chili, right? I loooove chili. The spicier the better!
Never really thought of it as chili, since I use black pepper instead of chili pepper (now I'm tempted to try it though). Just looked up chili on wikipedia and I think you're right in that it fits the definition.

Spicy equals good in my book too. :)
 
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