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TEKKEN 7 |Review Thread|

ZeroX03

Member
Oct 23, 2009
27,340
0
620
Australia/New Zealand

Metacritic
OpenCritic

All reviews are of the PS4 version as far as I can see. I've played builds of the PC version on high end GPUs and it's been a very good experience if you're a worried PC player, but no guarantees. Another Gaffer's PC impressions are extremely positive too.

IGN: 9.5 (not final)
Tekken 7 is a love letter to this long-running franchise and its staggering complexity. Yet somehow it still manages to be accessible to just about anyone wanting to mash buttons, and its huge amount of customization unlocks constantly give you something to strive for beyond its silly and slightly cliched story. In a pretty good time for fighting games, with Injustice 2 knocking it out of the park, Killer Instinct continuing to give us quality content years after its release, Street Fighter 5 hitting its stride after a rocky start, and a new version of Guilty Gear Xrd air-dashing our way, the King of the Iron Fist Tournament will not be outdone.
Heavy: 9.5
The wait was definitely worth it. Tekken 7 embodies the best parts of the series and throws in some meaningful additions. The Story Mode turns out to be one the best parts of not only this entry, but in all of fighting game history. From a mechanical standpoint, the fighting is balanced well, plays amazingly and stands out even more thanks to its livestream friendly features. The visuals shine even brighter and the soundtrack continues the legacy of Tekken’s great OST history. It’s a bit disheartening to play through the shockingly short solo character stories and encounter the lackluster character customization options, though. Even still, Tekken 7 pulls away with the win and hits a high mark for fighting games.
Press Start: 9
At its core, Tekken 7 manages to prove that the series still has a place after 20 years, showing no signs of slowing down. Newcomers will find their way into the game quite easily, and experienced players will be able to jump back into it and find most of their favourite characters ready to go and familiar to play with. But while the game does a lot of things right, some long-time players will find the omission of modes or characters a little jarring.
GameReactor UK: 9
GameReactor Spain: 9
Bandai Namco has hit a home run here and has created a game that is easily accessible in the same way Tekken has almost always been - something that has made it so popular - but at the same time it has managed to bring about a lot of changes and added depth to make it appealing even to the pros, likely for years to come. "May I have a rematch?" has been the most commonly spoken phrase around these parts for a while, and will likely stay that way, because this is an excellent game.

The addition of Akuma is a stroke of genius that also makes it easier for Street Fighter players and fans of 2D fighting to get into the Tekken world.
Wired: 9
Tekken 7 is a game that positively begs to be played, even if you're not typically a fan of the fighting genre.

Overall, this is the pinnacle of the Tekken series – a joy to play, with a wealth of content, that's as challenging and precise for aficionados as it is inviting and engaging for neophytes. A masterpiece of the fighting genre.
IGN Italy: 8.6
One of the best games in the series gameplay-wise, a little short in terms of single player modes.
PlayStation Lifestyle: 8.5
Tekken 7 remains an addicting technical fighter that constantly beckons you for just one more round. There are so many moves for each character, mastering even one complete move set will take nothing less than complete dedication. While it doesn’t feel as though Namco Bandai has done much to innovate in the genre from the surface, those who prefer Tekken’s brand of fighting than those of Capcom’s or NetherRealm’s will be in for a treat. Fans of the series will feel right at home, while those looking to ease their way into the series will find a lot to chew on. All that being said, Tekken 7 is a formidable entry into the fighting genre, and will provide hundreds of hours of fun for fans and newcomers alike. Just be prepared to learn a lot of new stuff.
Destructoid: 8
I was pleasantly surprised with Tekken 7: Fated Retribution, and will be keeping up with the meta and pro scene for the first time in years. While Harada and his crew could have easily given us a little more to do long term other than chase more treasure, it doesn't feel like grinding in the slightest given how fun it is to play.
Game Informer: 8
Tekken 7 does a good job of bringing the franchise up to standard on the current round of consoles. Though it falters in its story mode and getting new players in on the satisfying thrill of dodging your opponent’s attack and hitting them with a round-ending combo, it offers enough incentive for experienced players (or those willing to stick out the initial rough patch) to keep playing. The online works well enough that regular players should have enough of a reason to learn the deep combat system and get ready for the next battle.
Twinfinite: 8
As I pulled myself away from Tekken 7 to write this review, I was left torn. It gets so many things right, with its combat that feels like a substantial improvement over its predecessors and a solid roster that includes Akuma, one of my favorite fighting game characters of all time. I’d be lying if I said I didn’t enjoy my time with the game, and I certainly plan on returning back to my PS4 for more. However, I can just as honestly say that the single-player component often felt like a chore that got in the way of the series’ best story. If you’re looking for a great fighting game to play online or locally with friends, then I couldn’t possibly recommend Tekken 7 any more. But, if you’re looking for a stellar single-player experience that’s devoid of one-note AI and frustration, this is certainly one of the most frustrating single-player experiences I’ve had recently. At the end of day, Tekken 7 is a great fighting game, possibly one of the best, if you plan on playing with others. But as a game that leaves you to find joy on your own, while there is fun to be had, you’d have to fight through less than favorable situations to find it. (Zero's note: boy, sounds like Mario Kart)
Eurogamer Italy: 8
Tekken 7 is what the Tekken FGC was waiting for. Awesome gameplay, new mechanics, great characters and a good amount of contents. Something is still off, but the overall experience is fun, deep and entertaining.
TrustedReviews: 8
For the absolute casual player, the recently released Injustice 2 is a better package. The cinematic Story and brilliant Multiverse provide the single-player fighter with more than enough reason to keep coming back. But Tekken 7 is the game that comes closest to truly satisfying both parts of the fighting game market. The Story mode is daft fun, despite its short duration, and there’s an Arcade mode that apparently everyone wants in a fighting game, which alongside the Treasure Battle and customisation options make for a robust single-player experience for those who don’t ever fancy jumping into the online fights. However, for those hardcore players there’s plenty to enjoy from the deep, rewarding and varied roster of characters, fully featured and seemingly lag-free online modes, as well as the refinements to the core combat that make Tekken 7 the best since Tekken.
Push Square: 8
In terms of gameplay, Tekken 7 is masterful. Its overhauled rage system gives its already punchy combat a whole new dynamic, while helping to level the playing field for more casual players. Its story mode isn't quite the blockbuster that it thinks it is, but the insanely addictive treasure battle makes up for that on the single player front. Meanwhile, its online components can't be faulted – the newly introduced tournaments being a real highlight. Tekken 7 is a fantastic fighting game, and one of the best entries in the series.
GamesRadar: 8
By getting excited about the core systems at the expense of everything new, I feel like I’m celebrating a game for barely evolving over the last 20 years, but Tekken has always been that good. I’d rather be playing it than writing about it. But despite this, there’s something a bit sad about Tekken 7. By trying to compete with modern beat ‘em ups, it’s simultaneously more and less than it once was, and the failure of the new additions feels jarring when compared to modern fighters. This might be the last entry for Tekken that can still trade on a that joyful fighting system alone, but for now I’m happy to enjoy it for what it is: a powerful, gratifying, deeply cinematic fighting game.

Pro: It hasn’t changed much in 20 years
Con: It hasn’t changed much in 20 years
Shoryuken: 8
I am hopelessly biased towards the 3D fighter genre. Guilty. That said, I am still convinced this is the best-made 3D fighter we have had in years, even with some of the quibbles above. Every single aspect of this game feels like it was lovingly made by people that wanted to put forward not just the best fighting game possible, but the best game possible. Namco has a very particular view of what that means, though, and I think it sometimes does them a disservice. I have claimed multiple times on this site that Namco’s release cycle, frustrating as it may be, is necessary for the birth of a finely sculpted, complex product.
Metro: 8
Although there is a sense that Tekken 7 is the victim of some unfortunate timing this is a very solid sequel and proof that the Tekken formula is perfectly viable. There are plenty of new features, including a renewed attempt to appeal to the eSports crowed, but while none are going to change the genre forever, we’re not sure when that was the case for any new fighter. If you like Tekken or you just want a change from strictly 2D fighters then Tekken 7 is a very appealing game. It just isn’t very different to Tekken 6 or, we’re willing to bet, Tekken 8.
DualShockers: 8
Tekken 7 may not be the perfect entry point for newcomers into the long and twisted narrative that follows the Mishima Zaibatsu, but they will unmistakably have fun with the rock solid gameplay and mechanics. With the addictive Treasure Battle mode, deep character customization, and strong character options, Tekken 7 is one of the best titles in the 23 year-old series.
GameReactor Denmark: 8

EGM: 7.5
Tekken 7, the latest entry in the long-running franchise, delivers what fighting genre fans love about multiplayer battles, but there isn’t enough new material to make it truly stand out from the increasingly competitive options in the fighting genre.
Gamespot: Review in Progress
Tekken is back, and if you've kept up with the series over the years, you will feel right at home in Tekken 7. While we haven't had the chance to test its performance online, and thus aren't ready to offer a comprehensive review covering everything the game has to offer, we can say that Tekken's latest outing is a great fighting game offline that falls in line with the series' favorable reputation. Familiar faces, combo strings, and storylines both serious and absurd work just as well today as they did in the past, adding up to an experience that feels quite different from the likes of Street Fighter V or Injustice 2.
VG24/7: No Score
Just how satisfied you’ll be is going to depend on what type of experience you want. It’s true that if you want ridiculous depth and a shed load of truly different activities Injustice might be a better bet. If you just want to fight AI and don’t care too much for other types of single-player, you’ll be okay. If you’re willing to play against others on or offline, you’re in for a huge treat – Tekken 7 is the best-playing Tekken game since the PS1. That means I’m happy: I’m here for the fighting.
Giant Bomb Quick Look
Alternate Link: YouTube

Eurogamer: Tekken 7's PlayStation VR mode is a low-effort bolt-on (Not a review, just pointing out VR mode sucks)




Will update in further as things progress. Also no comparing review scores to school grades. Can we can go one review thread without it, please?
 

MrCookiepants

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Oct 17, 2010
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I'm impressed with the IGN review. It's not often you see a critic who understands fighting games, much less the Tekken series.

Edit: They scored the PS4 version a 9.5
 

GHG

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Nov 9, 2006
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All I want to know is whether there are any mini games like volleyball or tekken force mode.
 

cordy

Banned
Dec 7, 2015
8,321
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0
Honestly the better the scores, the more I hope people pick the game up. I'm seeing a lot of people wanting to try this out and the more people that pick up the game, the more GAF's Tekken scene grows. We welcome you all to play with us.
 

Line_HTX

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Sep 20, 2014
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Honestly, I'm glad Tekken took this long to get polished and not follow down the path of SFV. More people need to give Tekken a chance.
 
Dec 18, 2014
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So I like fighting games, but have never really played Tekken. Could someone describe the core appeal and general feel of the fighting to me?

From what I've seen, it seems similar to Soul Calibur's 8-way run. Would SC be a good comparison? Also, is the game particularly execution heavy, or is it fairly low execution like SC?
 

Rayge

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Jan 22, 2011
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Therr probably won't be any reviews for the pc version until release date. we don't even have footage of that version outside that old NVIDIA presentation.
 

cordy

Banned
Dec 7, 2015
8,321
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9.5 is low? How was the series average score?
Tekken 1 = good reviews
Tekken 2 = amazing reviews
Tekken 3 = amazing reviews (one of the greatest fighters of all time)
Tekken 4 = ok reviews
Tekken 5 = amazing reviews
Tekken 6 = good reviews
 

ZeroX03

Member
Oct 23, 2009
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Australia/New Zealand
PC reviews should somehow be highlighted.
afaik they're all PS4 copies.

From what I've played of the the PC version, it runs very well on high end GPUs.

So I like fighting games, but have never really played Tekken. Could someone describe the core appeal and general feel of the fighting to me?

From what I've seen, it seems similar to Soul Calibur's 8-way run. Would SC be a good comparison? Also, is the game particularly execution heavy, or is it fairly low execution like SC?
It's not quite 8 way run, it's more four ways, you don't move on a diagonal really. Execution is very low for most characters. Big generous windows, simple inputs. The trouble comes from remembering it all. It's certainly closer to SC and DoA than any of the 2D fighters at least.
 

Memory

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Nov 19, 2014
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Do any reviews say anything about the Xbox one version's performance or visuals? Seems everyone is reviewing PS4 version.
 

MrCookiepants

Member
Oct 17, 2010
6,472
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Australia
So I like fighting games, but have never really played Tekken. Could someone describe the core appeal and general feel of the fighting to me?

From what I've seen, it seems similar to Soul Calibur's 8-way run. Would SC be a good comparison? Also, is the game particularly execution heavy, or is it fairly low execution like SC?
Tekken is probably closer to a 2D fighter than full 3D movement. The game has a tonne of characters featuring really diverse fighting styles, some with more than 100 moves to learn.

The thing that the series really nails is the "feel". That intangible quality that makes a game satisfying to play. When you land a counter hit Deathfist with Paul, the screen shakes, the camera zooms in, times slows briefly, sparks fly everywhere and the opponent is sent a full screen away from the impact. The sounds effects are super crunchy. It just feels so good.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKlPicY3i90
 

Wallach

Member
Jun 26, 2008
29,846
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So I like fighting games, but have never really played Tekken. Could someone describe the core appeal and general feel of the fighting to me?

From what I've seen, it seems similar to Soul Calibur's 8-way run. Would SC be a good comparison? Also, is the game particularly execution heavy, or is it fairly low execution like SC?
Soul Calibur is a decent point of reference, though the game does not use quite the same free-form 8-way run system. The movement is more technical and controlled than Soul Calibur.

Execution wise it is a step up from Soul Calibur but not by a huge margin; it still uses a 4-button input system, but there are slightly more directional command inputs for moves on average. The combo system is much more elaborate though, and you can generally chain multiple strings together on an opponent in a juggle state whereas Soul Calibur tends to live in the 1-3 strike range per situation.

The stage is also a significant factor in each set like Soul Calibur, however there are no ring out possibilities, and the walls where present present a larger threat than in Soul Calibur as it will allow players far more control over your ability to defend and grant them extended damage opportunities. Some stages also have breakable walls or floors where you can get an extended damage opportunity if you knock them through the transition, and the transitions do not reset with each round so the entire set is one continuation (i.e. if the opponent knocks you through the wall onto the lower balcony, you will never return to the top level for the rest of the match).

General flow of the game compared to Soul Calibur I think would be sort of like if you took that game and increased the tension significantly. Movement is more deliberate and both players are poking and spacing looking for an opportunity to land a counter-hit or launcher attack to land their heavy damage juggle strings, with walls and wakeup situations being more dangerous. Damage potential is extremely high in Tekken so the actual pace on average isn't really slower than Soul Calibur unless neither player can manage to break the neutral tension (which sometimes happen in Soul Calibur as well with one player just eventually dying to pokes and such). Just as often though you'll end a round in 2-3 situations that all resulted in big damage.
 

cordy

Banned
Dec 7, 2015
8,321
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0
I couldn't read past the 10th occurrence of "The Mashima Saga" in the IGN review.
He needs to stop with the comedy. He tries to keep the bit up throughout the review but he says "Mishima" a few times in it too. He's got heart lol.
 
Dec 18, 2014
4,816
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Soul Calibur is a decent point of reference, though the game does not use quite the same free-form 8-way run system. The movement is more technical and controlled than Soul Calibur.

Execution wise it is a step up from Soul Calibur but not by a huge margin; it still uses a 4-button input system, but there are slightly more directional command inputs for moves on average. The combo system is much more elaborate though, and you can generally chain multiple strings together on an opponent in a juggle state whereas Soul Calibur tends to live in the 1-3 strike range per situation.

The stage is also a significant factor in each set like Soul Calibur, however there are no ring out possibilities, and the walls where present present a larger threat than in Soul Calibur as it will allow players far more control over your ability to defend and grant them extended damage opportunities. Some stages also have breakable walls or floors where you can get an extended damage opportunity if you knock them through the transition, and the transitions do not reset with each round so the entire set is one continuation (i.e. if the opponent knocks you through the wall onto the lower balcony, you will never return to the top level for the rest of the match).

General flow of the game compared to Soul Calibur I think would be sort of like if you took that game and increased the tension significantly. Movement is more deliberate and both players are poking and spacing looking for an opportunity to land a counter-hit or launcher attack to land their heavy damage juggle strings, with walls and wakeup situations being more dangerous. Damage potential is extremely high in Tekken so the actual pace on average isn't really slower than Soul Calibur unless neither player can manage to break the neutral tension (which sometimes happen in Soul Calibur as well with one player just eventually dying to pokes and such). Just as often though you'll end a round in 2-3 situations that all resulted in big damage.
Thanks for the breakdown! (and thanks to everyone else who helped describe Tekken to me too!)

With the exception of the long combo strings, the rest of what I'm reading sounds pretty dope. Since I bounced off Injustice 2 super quick, I think I'll trade it in and give T7 a shot.