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What are you reading? OCTOBER EDITION

Eric P

Member
Currently reading:

Henry Rollins Fanatic Vol 2.

(can't find images of it online)

It's a guy speaking very passionately about music. Taken from his radio show playlists. I love it.

also reading:


love it. taking my time with it to savour it.

up next:


and

 

Zilch

Banned
The People of Paper, by Salvador Plascencia. It's for a literature class, but it's an incredibly interesting book.
 

8bit

Knows the Score
William Gibson - Spook Country. Only just started, but I found Pattern Recognition to be quite enjoyable compared to the rest of his work, and I'm hopeful this will be similarly engaging.

I've also got Murakami's After Dark, but haven't cracked it open yet.
 

thomaser

Member
Right now:



The Twelve Caesars by Suetonius. Incredibly interesting "biographies" of the Roman caesars written 1900 years ago by a guy who knew everything there was to know about them. Lots of juicy gossip. Currently on Augustus, a likeable adulterer, and can't wait to get to Nero.



The Melancholy of Resistance by Laszlo Krashnahorkai. Seethingly sarcastic story about a mysterious Hungarian city and the self-important, schemeing, ridiculous people who live there. Tons of fun, and the writing is very attractive, even if the looong, convoluted sentences can be tiring at times.

I also just finished a collection of early novels by Knut Hamsun, containing Hunger, Mysteries, Pan and Victoria. The two first are amazing, and Pan and Victoria are also great. Johan K. Nagel in Mysteries is one of the most fascinating characters in literature.
 
Just finished:



Absolutely Incredible book. Scores extra points for coolest ninja sequence ever.



This is the way 300 should have told the story so much better.

And just started:



About half way in so far its pretty meh but hopefully it will pick up.
 

AlternativeUlster

Absolutely pathetic part deux
thomaser said:


The Melancholy of Resistance by Laszlo Krashnahorkai. Seethingly sarcastic story about a mysterious Hungarian city and the self-important, schemeing, ridiculous people who live there. Tons of fun, and the writing is very attractive, even if the looong, convoluted sentences can be tiring at times.

I also just finished a collection of early novels by Knut Hamsun, containing Hunger, Mysteries, Pan and Victoria. The two first are amazing, and Pan and Victoria are also great. Johan K. Nagel in Mysteries is one of the most fascinating characters in literature.

Hey, I found my copy in a dumpster.

Now, I am being a fucking poseur and decided to finally read the Wind-Up Bird Chronicle like it is 1999 all over again. I found Kafka on the Shore for .50 at a Thrift Store and own Sputnik Sweetheart and could never get past the opening sentence which goes "In the springtime of her 22nd year," I mean couldn't he just fucking say "When she was 22 in the spring" and that 22nd year crap annoys me.
 
Holy shit. At first I did not get that making money actually was a discworld book.

I thought it was some "serious" book or something. Had to google it to get it. More moist is great. Loved Postal.
 

regrib

Member


The Road by Cormac McCarthy captures moments of lyrical and emotional beauty in a father and son’s haunted relationship even as a silent cloud of death covers the world in darkness.
 

Eric P

Member
PuppetSlave said:
Holy shit. At first I did not get that making money actually was a discworld book.

I thought it was some "serious" book or something. Had to google it to get it. More moist is great. Loved Postal.

the past few books have been like that. i guess they're trying to appeal to people who would avoid series fantasy.
 

whytemyke

Honorary Canadian.
i'm reading books that I should have read awhile ago but never did. Farenheit 451 and A Farewell to Arms are both being read right now.
 

BTMash

Member
Divisadero by Michael Ondaatje - My wife is a big fan of Ondaatje and she asked me to read through this. I'm about halfway through and I'm really enjoying it.

Malgudi Days by R.K. Narayan - A collection of short stories based on the various habitants of a fictional town named Malgudi. Highly recommend reading (easy to read in short bursts as each of the short stories are 10 pages or less)
 
Consumer Behavior, 9th edition - Leon G. Schiffman, Leslie Lazar Kanuk

Influence: Science and Practice - Robert B. Cialdini

Creating a Winning E-Business, 2nd Edition - H. Albert Napier, Ollie Rivers, Stuart Wagner, JB Napier

Selling: The Profession (Focusing On Building Relationships), 4th Edition - David J. Lill

From A Buick 8 - Stephen King

Yeah, I'm in school.
 

Gigglepoo

Member
I've been readin the Enders Game quartet for a few weeks now. The first two were great, the 3rd was uneven and I haven't gotten into the 4th yet. When I'm done with this, I'm starting a Wrinkle in Time.
 
terror presidency by jack goldsmith, former assistant attorney general and OLC

and age of turbulence by alan greenspan
 

Armitage

Member


mmmm old school gibson intertwining storylines meets new school "so futuristic it could only be in the past." Delish.
 

Mifune

Mehmber
Jose Saramago - Blindness

Thanks to Hota and other fine GAF people for recommending this. It's great, but I just haven't had the time to devote to it lately.

Before that I read Chabon's latest, which was pretty great.
 

Flynn

Member
Zilch said:
The People of Paper, by Salvador Plascencia. It's for a literature class, but it's an incredibly interesting book.

Your lit teacher kicks ass. That's a great book. Lots to sink your teeth into essay wise.



I'm calling Oscar Wao a geek novel because Junot Diaz taps heavily into comics, sci-fi and RPG culture for one of the characters in this book. He totally groks what it means to grow up a geek, I'm assuming because he actually did.

Here's an early version of the Oscar Wao short story.
 

QVT

Fair-weather, with pride!

Friend told me to read it. I liked the beginning but it's turning to shit pretty quickly.

I have no idea what I'm going to read next. Maybe some Kafka.
 

Brobzoid

how do I slip unnoticed out of a gloryhole booth?


we by Yevgeny Zamyatin.

pretty good, but the constant silly references to "our time and it's terminology" is grating.

"the trial" by Kafka is next I think... maybe faucoult's pedelum. And I still have to finish fast food nation. :\
 
Gigglepoo said:
I've been readin the Enders Game quartet for a few weeks now. The first two were great, the 3rd was uneven and I haven't gotten into the 4th yet. When I'm done with this, I'm starting a Wrinkle in Time.

Yeah the quartet really can not compare to the first book but really how could they?
I found Enders Shadow to be the only one that I enjoyed almost as much as the first book.


Colonel Mustard said:
lol...fundie mormons.


Makes me sad that some people believe in this crap. =/

Yeah that book is really creepy course most Mormons arent fundamentalist and most dont even know about the crazy stuff that goes on in Utah but I agree its pretty sad.
 

QVT

Fair-weather, with pride!
surume said:
just finished No Country For Old Men. loved the first 2/3s hated the end.

People who are reading McCarthy now are doing it all wrong. Read his work up to Suttree. Then stop and walk away.
 

Vague

Member
Currently Reading: The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson and it is so great.

Next up...hopefully...will be Automated Alice by Jeff Noon...if it ever comes out of backorder from Amazon.
 

Xater

Member
I am not reading atm because I don't really feel like it but maybe audio books count too? I am listening too:

 

FnordChan

Member
I'm wrapping up Summer of Fluff '07 with:



This isn't to say that the Dresden Files series hasn't been entertaining - Butcher does a fine job with the supernatural noir schtick - but it's still pretty fluffy. That's okay. I am comfortable in my fluffitude.

As White Night is only available in hardcover, my current paperback is:



Yes, this is the true crime book the Scorsese film is based on. It's a fascinating account of the rise and fall of a casino boss with mafia ties during the 1970s, chock full of inside details about how to skim the take and the many ways in which people got killed during the time period. I'll backtrack and read Wiseguy at some point as well.

Could the folks reading Spook Country report back with a review? I'd forgotten that was coming out; reckon I'll finally start in on Patter Recognition when I finish Casino.

FnordChan
 
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