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What are you reading?

8bit

Knows the Score
carpal said:


So far it's way better than Quicksilver. Some of the best pirate scenes ever! PIRATES! YARR. I dunno, I'm really beginning to appreciate what he's doing with the series. Looking forward to taking it on vacation. Might pick up Imajica and American Gods to take along as well.


I'm also reading this. It's a bit disjointed, but a better read than Quicksilver.

Next up is this.


 

golem

Member


got impatient with my watch the movies before reading the books experiment, so just read philosopher's stone last week, now workin on book 2.
 
Just finished 'The Da Vinci Code' about a half hour ago, and i've got a question.
Why did Remy think about how much he hated having to serve Teabing, even though he knew that Teabing was 'The Teacher'?
 

FnordChan

Member
My current paperback:



Le Carre's spy novels are gripping, intelligent, grim affairs, particularly his George Smiley trilogy (Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, The Honourable Schoolboy, and Smiley's People) which are steeped in the purgatory of the mid-70s Cold War. After reading Tinker, Tailor I watched the BBC television adaptation (starring Alec Guinness in the role of his career - and that's saying something! - as George Smiley) and thoroughly enjoyed it. I then proceeded to get distracted early on in Schoolboy, skipped ahead to Smiley's People and liked that BBC adaptation even better than the first. Having finally returned to the poor, neglected Schoolboy, I'm suprised I was able to break away from it in the first place: it's as compelling as it is intricate. I highly recommend the entire sequence (both the books and the two TV miniseries) to anyone with even the slightest interest in espionage or the Cold War.

Next in line are a couple of trades that have been patiently waiting their turn for quite some time now:



Damn fine short SF. If the rest of the stories here are as good as "Hell Is The Absence Of God", I'm going to kick myself for putting this off for so long. Alas, the trade format is unweildy and I like to drag paperbacks with me all over creation, but I'll make do somehow. And, when that's done, on a particularly obscure note:



Donna Barr's An Insupportable Light, the novel that became the basis for her excellent series of Stinz comic books.

And one of these years I'll actually get around to reading Quicksilver and The Confusion.

FnordChan
 

SyNapSe

Member
Trying to make my way through Wizard and Glass right now (Dark tower IV), after that I"d like to finish the new releases in the series.

I haven't read the Da Vinci code yet, and I've been wanting too.
 

bjork

Member
I read GTO 19 tonight.

He says almost the exact same thing that got me suspended for two weeks in 2001 for making death threats, so I had a hearty laugh at that one. :D
 

pollo

Banned
because the da vinci code, regardless of how good it is, is still poorly written and is subject to several inconsistencies.
 

KingGondo

Banned
ballhog said:
allright fine , my links fail. White Noise, by Don Delillo and The Wanting Seed by Anthony Burgess.

What do you think of White Noise? I really enjoyed it--DeLillo is like an academic Chuck Palahniuk.

I'm reading--

Invisible Man-Ralph Ellison
Notes from Underground-Fyodor Dostoevsky
On the Origin of Species-Charles Darwin (for a summer course in Cambridge :))
 

ballhog

Member
I thought White Noise was as good as anything I've read, just excellent. I read sone other Delillo and it diddn't really do anything for me. It's like if you read Catch 22, and then read Something Happened, and nothing happens. It's still written really well, but there is nothing to it. I think everyone should devote a year to reading bitter dead foriegners. Celine comes to mind, Journey to the End of the Night and Death on The Installment Plan are better than just about everything else. And for the love of God, read Crime and Punishment.
 
For Delillo fans: LINK

I'm particularly not a fan of his work, just because I find it long-winded and tiresome, but he does have an unique style all his own.

Now reading:

Biochemistry by Garrett and Grisham, 2nd edition - yay for glycolysis! ugh.

Three Junes by Julia Glass - so far, it's a wonderful snapshot of a family's history

McSweeney's No. 12 - the 20-minute stories in it are hit and miss, but when they do work, they are very rewarding. and roddy doyle has a new rabbitte adventure in it!

On the list of things to read:
Dress Your Family... by David Sedaris - the few chapters I read in B&N were HILARIOUS, so I can't wait to finish the rest

Rising Up and Falling Down by William Vollmann - the massive 7-volume set on the human history of violence is on its way to me now...someone from the old-GAF was reading it, so I can't wait become involved in this massive undertaking.
 

Manders

Banned
I was about to read the Da Vinci Code, but then I found out they're making a movie out of it. I'll just wait for the movie. Watching>>>>reading!!
 

sc0la

Unconfirmed Member
Manders said:
I was about to read the Da Vinci Code, but then I found out they're making a movie out of it. I'll just wait for the movie. Watching>>>>reading!!
*smacks forehead*
 

Mama Smurf

My penis is still intact.
Drinky Crow said:



"The Warrior-Prophet" by R. Scott Bakker, the sequel to "The Darkness That Comes Before". Great epic fantasy on par with or better than GRR Martin, and certainly a sight better than Erikson and (yuck) Jordan.

http://www.sffworld.com/authors/b/bakker_scott/sffreviews/warriorprophet.html

I was thinking of picking The Darkness That Comes Before up, but now you've recommended it and had a go at Erikson in the same post, I can hardly think of a lower recommendation. I'll try and find it at my library instead.
 
Ryo said:
The lovely

I almost bought this today: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/t...102-2200424-4992105?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

I didn't pick it up solely because I wanted something else, but I'll definitely get it later. I read through a few pages, and it seemed to be a really nice companion piece to the novel. Michael Chabon writes histories of the release of each comic, as though they were really created by Joe Kavalier and Sam Clay.

I also like Chris Ware's artwork on the front and back covers (I especially like the back cover).



Another thing I'm anticipating is details regarding the film adaptation of The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay. Since Chabon is doing the actual adaptation, it'll be interesting to see what stays and what goes. And it'll also be interesting to see how Chabon writes when it comes to screenplays. I was looking forward to Spider Man 2 when I heard Chabon was on board for the screenplay, but it appears he ended up playing a much more minor role in its creation; although I do believe he did write a screenplay of his own. Perhaps the studio didn't think he was experienced enough; maybe it sucked. Nonetheless, I pretty much love everything he's written -- even the Mysteries of Pittsburgh (it's a fun little romp! c'mon).
 
ballhog said:
Americana was prety bad, I agree.
The thing about Americana is that every character in the novel actually made me angry. I honestly wanted to beat their fucking faces in because they were so unlikeable.

But I do like some of DeLillo's books that aren't White Noise. Especially Mao II.

Then again, I don't think I can get past like the first 20 pages of Underworld. Man, it's so overwhelming.
 

Firest0rm

Member


I just finished reading this a while back, plan to start reading the second one later on. Great book, I recommended it for any people that like fantasy medievel type stories.
 
Thanks to a recommendation in another thread, I am currently reading A Grave Talent.

After I finish this I will probably read The Lovely Bones.
 
FnordChan said:


Damn fine short SF. If the rest of the stories here are as good as "Hell Is The Absence Of God", I'm going to kick myself for putting this off for so long. Alas, the trade format is unweildy and I like to drag paperbacks with me all over creation, but I'll make do somehow. And, when that's done, on a particularly obscure note:

They're not, but Stories of Your Life is nearly as good and everything in there is well worth reading. If you want non-stop good SF short stories, pick up John M. Ford's Heat of Fusion!
 

aoi tsuki

Member
scola said:
How is this?

It's like a dictionary covering the major ideals in various types of design (graphic, architectural, etc.). The first page presents a theory, a concise definition, and then an deeper explanation with sources on the side. On the facing page is an example of the theory, often taken from a real life application. There's 100 theories in all.

The bad is that each theory adheres to this format religuously. i'd love to read a few pages on usability, but the book only has two. It feels like it's written more for the person who knows a little about design, but wants to improve. Near the beginning of the book there's actually a section which breaks the book down into reading plans if you want to improve a design, influence choice with a design, make a design accessible, and so on. If i were a design student in any concentration, i'd likely have enough books that would eclipse this one. It may not be a fair comparison to compare a handful of books to one, but it still feels too general.

Overall a good read, but i'd rather have something dedicated to graphic design (which i've taken some classes in) than something so broad.
 

Volt

Member
Reading several books at the same time, which I know might end up being confusing..



An excellent book, I'm reading Dance Dance Dance next !!





Now THIS is a book you can learn from... Very much unlike "The Da Vinci Code" which is a trashy novel that proclaims to bring facts when all it does is just deceiving the readers for the sake of it's own shaky plot. People who have read, or are reading, the book should check out this website : http://www.tektonics.org/davincicrude.htm ! Sure, it looks like a Christian website, so they might seem likely to debunk Brown's work. But for those who are actually interested in well-researched FACTS in stead of Brown's conoctions, I'd really suggest at least keeping an open mind and reading this debunk as wel..

EDIT : another good source for more on Leonardo, Mary Magdalena, Saunière etc.. -> http://www.epwijnants-lectures.com/davincicode.html
 
Why is The DaVinci Code so frickin' popular? I flipped through it at the airport and it seemed like a poorly written third-rate thriller packed with awkwardly infodumped "facts" about works of art which seemed basically like visual numerology. What's the dilly-o?
 

Volt

Member
JackFrost2012 said:
Why is The DaVinci Code so frickin' popular? I flipped through it at the airport and it seemed like a poorly written third-rate thriller packed with awkwardly infodumped "facts" about works of art which seemed basically like visual numerology. What's the dilly-o?

Well, it's supposedly "controversial" (it's nothing even remotely close, it basically mimicks some older works of fiction like The Holy Blood, The Holy Grail), and many of the ideas and theories in it are probably new for a huge crowd of readers.

I can tell from your nick that you've read The Invisibles, so it's very understandable that the "facts" in Da Vinci seem very dubious to you. We've learned how to question everything, especially works of fiction that proclaim to be fact :D

Like I said, I'd challenge all the people who go nuts over Da Vinci to check out the two websites I mentioned above. I should warn ya though : they might seem controversial and contain true facts :)
 

Prospero

Member
Volt said:
Well, it's supposedly "controversial" (it's nothing even remotely close, it basically mimicks some older works of fiction like The Holy Blood, The Holy Grail), and many of the ideas and theories in it are probably new for a huge crowd of readers.

Yeah--sometimes a book like this just gets lucky, and finds its way out of a niche into an enormous popular audience. Like Harry Potter books for people who never read any fantasy, or The Matrix movies for people who never read any William Gibson.
 

FnordChan

Member
JackFrost2012 said:
If you want non-stop good SF short stories, pick up John M. Ford's Heat of Fusion!

That's been on my list for a while now. Thanks for the reminder to swing by a bookstore and pick it up once I thin out my backlog somewhat. John M. Ford is freakin' awesome.

FnordChan
 
Prospero said:
Yeah--sometimes a book like this just gets lucky, and finds its way out of a niche into an enormous popular audience. Like Harry Potter books for people who never read any fantasy, or The Matrix movies for people who never read any William Gibson.

I thought the Matrix movies were for people who never read any Philip K. Dick. ;)
 
FnordChan said:
That's been on my list for a while now. Thanks for the reminder to swing by a bookstore and pick it up once I thin out my backlog somewhat. John M. Ford is freakin' awesome.

FnordChan

I'm reading Ford's Star Trek novels now, they are frickin' awesome. This is from someone who doesn't much like Star Trek and REALLY has zero tolerance for Star Trek novels.

The Final Reflection is a first contact novel from the Klingon perspective, set about 60 years before TOS. Serious, well done, very good SF by any standard. TNG ripped off its Klingon culture (and several of its plotlines) from this book, despite it being "non-canonical."

How Much For Just the Planet? is a slapstick comedy of errors, with Klingons in tuxes, Merry Wives of Windsor double crosses, and lots and lots of singing. It's a MUSICAL. It's like Star Trek X-2, and it is mightily hilarious.

I should clarify my previous comments on Stories of Your Life and Others: when I say the other stories aren't as good as Hell is the Absence of God, that's not meant as a slight at all. Hell is the Absence of God is probably one of my top five SF short stories. (off the top of my head, that top five would probably include Ford's Heat of Fusion and Chromatic Aberration and Ellison's The Deathbird and I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream.)
 

FnordChan

Member
JackFrost2012 said:
I'm reading Ford's Star Trek novels now, they are frickin' awesome. This is from someone who doesn't much like Star Trek and REALLY has zero tolerance for Star Trek novels.

I picked up How Much For Just The Planet? ages ago. I'm going to get around to reading it one of these days, I swear...

As part of the John Ford lovefest, I should point out that the old Paranoia module "The Yellow Clearance Black Box Blues" is the finest role-playing adventure ever published.

I should clarify my previous comments on Stories of Your Life and Others: when I say the other stories aren't as good as Hell is the Absence of God, that's not meant as a slight at all. Hell is the Absence of God is probably one of my top five SF short stories. (off the top of my head, that top five would probably include Ford's Heat of Fusion and Chromatic Aberration and Ellison's The Deathbird and I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream.)

No worries, I knew exactly what you meant; "Hell is the Absence of God" absolutely kicked my ass, so if the rest of Chiang's stories aren't up to that level it's through no fault of their own.

FnordChan, contemplating his top five SF short stories
 
FnordChan said:
I picked up How Much For Just The Planet? ages ago. I'm going to get around to reading it one of these days, I swear...

It's REALLY funny and like a two hour read, if that. Get around to it next time you need a quick laugh!

FnordChan said:
As part of the John Ford lovefest, I should point out that the old Paranoia module "The Yellow Clearance Black Box Blues" is the finest role-playing adventure ever published.

All I'm gonna say is, thank God for obsessive scanners and pen & paper DC++ hubs. Anyone who wants the PDF, PM me!
 

FnordChan

Member
JackFrost2012 said:
It's REALLY funny and like a two hour read, if that. Get around to it next time you need a quick laugh!

I could probably use a break after reading 500 pages of grey 70s spy fiction. I'll dig it up tonight and add it to the top of my list.

All I'm gonna say is, thank God for obsessive scanners and pen & paper DC++ hubs. Anyone who wants the PDF, PM me!

I love you, man.

FnordChan
 
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