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Why is there no video footage of Mars?

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Gustav

Banned
Or maybe I'm just too lazy to find it in a swath of links to "OMG LIFE ON MARS ITS TRUE NASA LIED" videos. But, if I recall correctly, Curiosity is able to make video (at low frame rates). Why are there none released by NASA yet? Did they take videos at all? Not enough bandwidth or transmission problems?

I would love to see Mars in motion.
 
D

Deleted member 10571

Unconfirmed Member
Or maybe I'm just too lazy to find it in a swath of links to "OMG LIFE ON MARS ITS TRUE NASA LIED" videos. But, if I recall correctly, Curiosity is able to make video (at low frame rates). Why are there none released by NASA yet? Did they take videos at all? Not enough bandwidth or transmission problems?

I would love to see Mars in motion.

http://www.space.com/17324-curiosity-s-360-degree-mars-view-video.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/...displays-first-year-of-Curiosity-mission.html


the hell did you search for OP, this took me literally one minute.
 

DieH@rd

Banned
Or maybe I'm just too lazy to find it in a swath of links to "OMG LIFE ON MARS ITS TRUE NASA LIED" videos. But, if I recall correctly, Curiosity is able to make video (at low frame rates). Why are there none released by NASA yet? Did they take videos at all? Not enough bandwidth or transmission problems?

I would love to see Mars in motion.

Mars > Earth bandwidth is VERY expensive.

Although it's very awesome that we have managed to establish up to 3mbits downstream from another fucking planet. We have Deep Space Network to thank for that.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sn4UGJnsTTg
 

Kiraly

Member
The Americans did not actually go there.

We'll have to wait on the Chinese to make any significant scientific progress.
 
 

Orbis

Member
They'd rather use the limited bandwidth to send back high resolution photos (or, lots of lower resolution photos which can be stitched together), which is far more useful and of scientific value when, generally speaking, there isn't much moving on the surface to justify videos. There are some interesting low-res timelapses, like this one which shows 'dust devils' on the surface; this is probably the closest thing to what you're after:

 

vio

Member
You have no idea how expensive/time consuming is to render a single frame let alone a video. Especially something perfectly photorealistic.
 

pswii60

Member
I'm a bit bored of Mars. It's been a dead environment for millions of years. I'd like them to dig deep though to try and find potential 'fossils', but it's unlikely they'll get the equipment up there to do that for many years yet. Hopefully in my lifetime though.

I'm more interested in what's beyond, especially Titan and Europa. Also can't wait to see the first near-by photos of Pluto from New Horizons next year.

Just so frustrating that we'll never get a real look at what's in other solar systems. All those galaxies billions of light years away too. What's out there? We'll never know.
 

Ovid

Member
Or maybe I'm just too lazy to find it in a swath of links to "OMG LIFE ON MARS ITS TRUE NASA LIED" videos. But, if I recall correctly, Curiosity is able to make video (at low frame rates). Why are there none released by NASA yet? Did they take videos at all? Not enough bandwidth or transmission problems?

I would love to see Mars in motion.
NASA has posted video from Curiostiy many times dude.
 

Kritz

Banned
For an AI class at uni we had one of the Australian guys who works with NASA on the curiosity project come speak to us. Of all the things he said that I wasn't paying attention to because I was playing Super Hexagon on my phone, was that they can only send a few megabytes of data each mars day - they can't transmit during a mars night due to the heat conduction / metal expansion. Or something like that.

I'm going to guess that sending photographs has more scientific value than whatever video can be compressed within the transfer's bandwidth allowance, over the number of days it'd take to get a minute or two of footage.

(but again I have no idea because the third stage of super hexagon is balls hard)
 

Dega

Eeny Meenie Penis
Because we've never been there. All those pictures are from New Mexico and edited to look alien. Why you think there was a coke cap in one of the photos?
 

Jasup

Member
Let's look at the Curiosity rover, which is the most advanced piece of equipment on Mars:

It's a 900kg rover with a multitude of science and telecommunication equipment on board. It uses all of these and moves itself around with a power source that provides it with 110W of electrical power.

Even if it did record high quality video, it wouldn't be very exciting with the rover's 90m/h top speed.
 

Raiden

Banned
They'd rather use the limited bandwidth to send back high resolution photos (or, lots of lower resolution photos which can be stitched together), which is far more useful and of scientific value when, generally speaking, there isn't much moving on the surface to justify videos. There are some interesting low-res timelapses, like this one which shows 'dust devils' on the surface; this is probably the closest thing to what you're after:


Damn Mars framerate sucks. Thank god we got a good 60fps here on earth.
 

Woorloog

Banned

Still think it won't happen. Sure, data-transfer systems must exists between space stations and colonies but it won't be... can't be used exactly like the Internet is used. For casual users that is.
Not to mention the costs involved... I'm sure someone will implement data-caps, limit bandwidth etc. just for profit.

EDIT Hmm. Suppose a martian colonist makes an internet page. Probably easier to copy it to Earth servers and other places, and beam updates to them. No one outside Mars connects directly to the site but rather their local copy.
 

Walshicus

Member
Still think it won't happen. Sure, data-transfer systems must exists between space stations and colonies but it won't be... can't be used exactly like the Internet is used. For casual users that is.
Not to mention the costs involved... I'm sure someone will implement data-caps, limit bandwidth etc. just for profit.

Not sure if you're joking or not...
 

DieH@rd

Banned
For those who are wondering, ISS has 10/3 mbit connection to the Internet.

That's better than I have in my home [ADSL 10/1 [8/0.8 in reality]. :D
 

Walshicus

Member
About profit, no. Someone's sure to make profit from data transfer systems, at least for non-critical use (anything that is not Governmental, mission-control, emergency, military).

I guess you didn't really read any of the links then... "Interplanetary Internet" is not what you apparently think it is.
 

Irminsul

Member
The better question is. When are they finally going to start building on Mars? =P
Rather build on Venus before that.

Why? Simple. The first thing is that you're not really building on Venus itself, but motherfucking floating platforms in its atmosphere. You can do that because Venus' atmosphere is much denser than what humans would need.

Energy is also no problem, you could use the sun (which is much closer than on Mars) and, additionally, elements from Venus' atmosphere. Through this, you'd also be able to synthesise elements needed for food. Furthermore, the atmosphere would help protecting humans from nasty cosmic rays.

The only problem would probably be stabilising the platform, but that can be solved ;) Still much better than a dead landscape that can't be used for much.
 

Walshicus

Member
Rather build on Venus before that.

Why? Simple. The first thing is that you're not really building on Venus itself, but motherfucking floating platforms in its atmosphere. You can do that because Venus' atmosphere is much denser than what humans would need.

Energy is also no problem, you could use the sun (which is much closer than on Mars) and, additionally, elements from Venus' atmosphere. Through this, you'd also be able to synthesise elements needed for food. Furthermore, the atmosphere would help protecting humans from nasty cosmic rays.

The only problem would probably be stabilising the platform, but that can be solved ;) Still much better than a dead landscape that can't be used for much.

Venus has a day longer than it's year, barely any magnetic field, scorching hell below the clouds and no solid surface to build on.

Mars has a day virtually equal to Earth's, would need only a few degrees of warming to create an atmosphere thick enough to walk in, has plentiful materials to use and while still lacking a magnetic field it'd be less of an issue than on Venus due to the distance from the Sun.
 

Jedi2016

Member
Also bear in mind that the rover does everything very slowly. Even turning the camera is done slow, and it moves forward only inches at a time. Video wouldn't really show much except what appears to be a still-frame. It's like showing dash-cam footage from a parked car looking at a wall.
 

DBT85

Member
For those who are wondering, ISS has 10/3 mbit connection to the Internet.

That's better than I have in my home [ADSL 10/1 [8/0.8 in reality]. :D

If an astronaut torrents a film on the ISS, where does the cease and desist letter get sent?
 
Or maybe I'm just too lazy to find it in a swath of links to "OMG LIFE ON MARS ITS TRUE NASA LIED" videos. But, if I recall correctly, Curiosity is able to make video (at low frame rates). Why are there none released by NASA yet? Did they take videos at all? Not enough bandwidth or transmission problems?

I would love to see Mars in motion.

nothing to see. nothing moves but the wind
 
They'd rather use the limited bandwidth to send back high resolution photos (or, lots of lower resolution photos which can be stitched together), which is far more useful and of scientific value when, generally speaking, there isn't much moving on the surface to justify videos. There are some interesting low-res timelapses, like this one which shows 'dust devils' on the surface; this is probably the closest thing to what you're after:


Thats just fascinating, thanks.
 
Because neither the moon landing or the trip to mars is real. All filmed in the desert somewhere. You should be asking why the deep oceans are such a mystery and why it's so easy to travel into space yet we know jack about the abyss. OR DO WE?
 
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