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AMD Ryzen Thread: Affordable Core Act

·feist·

Member
Nov 26, 2006
3,551
0
0
ComputerBase - Processor ranking June 2017: http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showpost.php?p=239587719&postcount=3075


PCGH (PC Games Hardware) - CPU Performance Index June 2017: http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showpost.php?p=239732671&postcount=3079


Hexus - Bang4Buck and Bang4Watt: http://hexus.net/tech/reviews/cpu/107017-intel-core-i9-7900x-14nm-skylake-x/?page=9


The Tech Report - Price vs Performance: http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showpost.php?p=239296098&postcount=3051




Hardware Unboxed [YouTube] —— Top 5 Best CPUs, Ryzen 3 & Threadripper In Mind!

TechSpot —— TechSpot PC Buying Guide: The 2017 Ryzen Update


Article Index (Direct Links):

01. TechSpot PC Buying Guide

02. The Budget Box — [Intel Pentium G4560]

03. The Entry-Level Rig — [AMD Ryzen 5 1400]

04. The Enthusiast's PC — [AMD Ryzen 5 1600]

05. The Luxury System — [AMD Ryzen 7 1700]

06. The Extreme Machine — [Intel Core i9-7900X]​


The TechSpot PC Buying Guide offers a comprehensive analysis of today's best desktop PC hardware spanning five well differentiated budgets. Starting at ~$400 for an affordable PC capable of medium workloads, followed by two well-balanced enthusiast-oriented machines, a premium high-end build, and finally a dream machine that disregards price-to-performance value altogether with a focus on the biggest and baddest hardware available, period.

Whether you're a first time builder seeking guidance or a seasoned enthusiast, we have you covered.

The Entry-Level Rig
• Good Performance • Fast for Everyday Computing • Casual Gaming




The Enthusiast's PC
• Excellent performance • Great Multitasker • Perfect for Gaming




The Luxury System
• High-end Performance • Heavy Multitasking • Hardcore Gaming

 

·feist·

Member
Nov 26, 2006
3,551
0
0
AGESA 1.0.0.6 Final Release

CROSSHAIR VI HERO BIOS 1403
1. Update AGESA code to 1.0.0.6
2. Improve system stability


It has been nearly a month and asus still hasn't brought out the new bios update...how long is this going to take? I mean i don't mind but i really want my memory to work like intended.
They've had no less than 4 betas based on 1006, and other Asus AM4s have had final releases put out some time ago.

Here is the C6H's final:


http://dlcdnet.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/SocketAM4/CROSSHAIR-VI-HERO/CROSSHAIR-VI-HERO-ASUS-1403.zip


 

CazTGG

Member
Jan 24, 2015
4,019
0
0
www.youtube.com
Which motherboard is best for overclocking? I'm leaning towards the MSI Titanium but I can't find much about its overclocking potential compared to the other X370 boards.
 
Feb 9, 2007
3,512
19
1,160
Which motherboard is best for overclocking? I'm leaning towards the MSI Titanium but I can't find much about its overclocking potential compared to the other X370 boards.

On my personal experience with an X370 Gaming Pro Carbon, stay away from MSI if you want to overclock. Spend a bit more money and actually invest on something good like the ASRock Taichi or the Asus Crosshair Hero VI.
 

Paragon

Member
Aug 22, 2016
1,463
0
0
Which motherboard is best for overclocking? I'm leaning towards the MSI Titanium but I can't find much about its overclocking potential compared to the other X370 boards.
I could be mistaken, but aren't the MSI boards the ones that were said to be taking advantage of people by selling what should really be a mid-range board at a premium price?

I have been happy with my Crosshair VI Hero - no issues with it at all.
Heard good things about the ASRock Taichi and Gigabyte Gaming 7 too, but I believe the C6H has the most advanced memory design and has a better chance of supporting high speeds with 4 DIMMs.

EDIT: Overpriced VRM design on MSI X370 XPOWER Titanium
Sounds like the C6H or Taichi are the boards to go for.
 

XxCGSxX

Member
Aug 15, 2010
1,040
0
0
Puerto Rico
Ok, just yesterday built my brand new pc, upgraded from AMD FX 8320 PC:
AMD Ryzen 5 1600X stock clocks
Noctua NH-U12S SE-AM4 cooler
MSI GTX 1060 gaming X 6GB
MSI tomahawk b350
Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB (2x8GB) DDR4 DRAM 3200MHz C16
Phanteks Eclipse Series P400
CORSAIR CXM series CX650M 650W
WD Blue 1TB SATA 6 Gb/s 7200 RPM

So after a day of use and gaming, can someone with experience tell me if these temps are ok? These are my temps using HWInfo64 for the CPU and GPU after idling and playing Battlegrounds so far (Power plan AMD Ryzen Balanced):
CPU(Tdie) Idle: 27.4c - 32c
CPU(Tdie) while playing Battlegrounds for aprox. 1 hour each session: Max temp. 54.4C
GPU idle: 27c - 31c
GPU while playing Battlegrounds for aprox. 1 hour each session: Max temp. 63C (Fans turn on after reaching 60c)
 

Papacheeks

Member
Jan 30, 2013
7,592
3,698
790
Watertown, NY
Ok, just yesterday built my brand new pc, upgraded from AMD FX 8320 PC:
AMD Ryzen 5 1600X stock clocks
Noctua NH-U12S SE-AM4 cooler
MSI GTX 1060 gaming X 6GB
MSI tomahawk b350
Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB (2x8GB) DDR4 DRAM 3200MHz C16
Phanteks Eclipse Series P400
CORSAIR CXM series CX650M 650W
WD Blue 1TB SATA 6 Gb/s 7200 RPM

So after a day of use and gaming, can someone with experience tell me if these temps are ok? These are my temps using HWInfo64 for the CPU and GPU after idling and playing Battlegrounds so far (Power plan AMD Ryzen Balanced):
CPU(Tdie) Idle: 27.4c - 32c
CPU(Tdie) while playing Battlegrounds for aprox. 1 hour each session: Max temp. 54.4C
GPU idle: 27c - 31c
GPU while playing Battlegrounds for aprox. 1 hour each session: Max temp. 63C (Fans turn on after reaching 60c)

Those are completely fine and normal temps. I have the same CPU and even with my water cooler temps vary from 28-32c on idle and around high 50's- mid 60's when playing something like PUBG. And that's with a overclock so your fine.
 

Hesh

Member
May 21, 2013
970
0
0
Contemplating upgrading to a Ryzen CPU from my FX-8350 around Black Friday, although since I need a new mobo for it I'm also contemplating upgrading to an Intel CPU for the first time (I've only used a Phenom II X4, an FX-4350, and now an FX-8350 for the past year or so). Has gaming performance improved on Ryzen CPU's since launch? I enjoy the FX-8350's 8 cores and being able to OC it since I multitask a lot, but even when I focus entirely on a game and shut extraneous stuff down (I started using Process Lasso to help) it's still a pretty dated CPU for modern gaming due to the weak single core power. I remember when Ryzen came out I read a lot of stuff in this thread about how it still performed average in games, I think it even failed to match i5's in gaming benchmarks. How's it fare these days? I only have a GTX 1060 and a 1080p monitor so I'm not worried about 4K gaming (or even 2K) or VR, but I like playing games at Ultra as long as they run above 30 FPS (otherwise I'd just play them on console).
 

Mr Swine

Banned
Nov 30, 2011
9,772
0
0
Sweden
Ok, just yesterday built my brand new pc, upgraded from AMD FX 8320 PC:
AMD Ryzen 5 1600X stock clocks
Noctua NH-U12S SE-AM4 cooler
MSI GTX 1060 gaming X 6GB
MSI tomahawk b350
Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB (2x8GB) DDR4 DRAM 3200MHz C16
Phanteks Eclipse Series P400
CORSAIR CXM series CX650M 650W
WD Blue 1TB SATA 6 Gb/s 7200 RPM

So after a day of use and gaming, can someone with experience tell me if these temps are ok? These are my temps using HWInfo64 for the CPU and GPU after idling and playing Battlegrounds so far (Power plan AMD Ryzen Balanced):
CPU(Tdie) Idle: 27.4c - 32c
CPU(Tdie) while playing Battlegrounds for aprox. 1 hour each session: Max temp. 54.4C
GPU idle: 27c - 31c
GPU while playing Battlegrounds for aprox. 1 hour each session: Max temp. 63C (Fans turn on after reaching 60c)

I have the same cooler and that is fine
 

Nokterian

Member
Jul 20, 2012
18,400
1
0
twitter.com
·feist·;242791317 said:
AGESA 1.0.0.6 Final Release

CROSSHAIR VI HERO BIOS 1403
1. Update AGESA code to 1.0.0.6
2. Improve system stability


They've had no less than 4 betas based on 1006, and other Asus AM4s have had final releases put out some time ago.

Here is the C6H's final:


http://dlcdnet.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/SocketAM4/CROSSHAIR-VI-HERO/CROSSHAIR-VI-HERO-ASUS-1403.zip

YES Finally!

I just updated the BIOS and put on D.O.C.P Standard and now my memory does run 3200Mhz,at last!

Very happy now with this and good work from AMD.
 

Louis Cyphre

Banned
Jun 5, 2011
5,321
819
470
Updated my X370 MSI Carbon motherboard to 1.7 but still can't get my ram to 3200, There is a new option for 3066 and it works for me.
 

Nostremitus

Member
Mar 24, 2012
8,868
2
0
Seoul, ROK
Updated my X370 MSI Carbon motherboard to 1.7 but still can't get my ram to 3200, There is a new option for 3066 and it works for me.

YES Finally!

I just updated the BIOS and put on D.O.C.P Standard and now my memory does run 3200Mhz,at last!

Very happy now with this and good work from AMD.

Which RAM do you both have?

I'm wondering if I'll see the same increases with my Ripjaws and X370 MSI Carbon when I get my computer back.
I shipped it ahead of me to the U.S. I'm moving from S.
Korea to the U.S. next week.
 

CazTGG

Member
Jan 24, 2015
4,019
0
0
www.youtube.com
I could be mistaken, but aren't the MSI boards the ones that were said to be taking advantage of people by selling what should really be a mid-range board at a premium price?

I have been happy with my Crosshair VI Hero - no issues with it at all.
Heard good things about the ASRock Taichi and Gigabyte Gaming 7 too, but I believe the C6H has the most advanced memory design and has a better chance of supporting high speeds with 4 DIMMs.

EDIT: Overpriced VRM design on MSI X370 XPOWER Titanium
Sounds like the C6H or Taichi are the boards to go for.

On my personal experience with an X370 Gaming Pro Carbon, stay away from MSI if you want to overclock. Spend a bit more money and actually invest on something good like the ASRock Taichi or the Asus Crosshair Hero VI.

In Canada, they're roughly the same price so i'll look into getting the recommended Asus/Gigabyte motherboard for my current planned build: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/list/bN98BP

One question I do have is whether the Asus motherboard will support memory over 3200 MHz or if that'll cause problems.
 

Louis Cyphre

Banned
Jun 5, 2011
5,321
819
470
Which RAM do you both have?

I'm wondering if I'll see the same increases with my Ripjaws and X370 MSI Carbon when I get my computer back.
I shipped it ahead of me to the U.S. I'm moving from S.
Korea to the U.S. next week.

Corsair Vengeance Lpx CMK16GX4M2B3200C16
 

RumblingRosco

Member
Oct 23, 2007
18,022
0
1,235
MSI still doesn't have the newest BIOS with AGESA 1.0.0.6, but I got my 3000 MHz RAM to 2933 at 1.35V as-is, so I guess I can't complain too much. The sticks weren't even on the QVL.

This is regarding the B350M Gaming Pro board. There is a beta BIOS with it but I don't touch beta BIOS.
 

Buggy Loop

Member
Jun 9, 2004
6,357
3,028
1,710
Quebec, canada
Bought the ASRock AB350 fatal1ty gaming-ITX/AC on friday, as soon as they appeared in Canada actually on Vuugo.

But... still no reviews? No unboxing? Wow
 

Paragon

Member
Aug 22, 2016
1,463
0
0
In Canada, they're roughly the same price so i'll look into getting the recommended Asus/Gigabyte motherboard for my current planned build: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/list/bN98BP
One question I do have is whether the Asus motherboard will support memory over 3200 MHz or if that'll cause problems.
The C6H and Taichi have the highest-spec VRMs, with the Gigabyte and MSI boards being lower-spec. If I recall correctly, it was 300A for C6H/Taichi, and 240A for Gigabyte/MSI.
Of course there's more to a board than just that, and it's not like current Ryzen CPUs are going to need that anyway.
The issue is that MSI's boards are the most expensive of all the AM4 boards, despite the lesser component choices.

The C6H supports 3600MT/s, and some people have even got RAM running faster than that.
It's likely that you will need specific memory kits though, and not all CPUs may be able to handle it since the memory controller is integrated in the CPU, and it's only specified for up to 3200MT/s operation.
Generally the X CPUs seem to have better luck with fast RAM.

ASUS' QVL list hasn't been updated since March, so there's nothing faster than 3200MT/s on it, but generally Samsung B-Die kits do well.
I have heard that all of Corsair's 3600MT/s kits of any rating are all Samsung B-Die, and the kit that I received was.
I had no trouble running that at 3600MT/s even before the AGESA 1.0.0.6 update, but I think I've been lucky with my CPU's IMC.
That said, I have also seen practically no difference in my own tests above 2666MT/s speeds, so I don't know that I would pay a premium for it.

Looking over your build, I'm puzzled to see a $300 sound card on there.
Unless you have very specific requirements, there's absolutely no reason for it.
I would either suggest using the on-board audio, a cheaper card like a $70 Sound Blaster Z, or an external device, depending on what your needs are.

I see that you also have the new WiFi AC version of the C6H in your basket, and a $100 USB WiFi adapter.

A pair of GTX 1080 Tis in SLI seems overkill for a 1440p G-Sync monitor too. I'm not sure if you just want "the best" or if you have a specific use for them.
I would rather ditch one and buy a higher-end display, like one of the 27" IPS 1440p165 monitors or a 34" ultrawide.
Though it's also worth mentioning that HDR models supporting higher refresh rates are said to be available before the end of the year.
 

Buggy Loop

Member
Jun 9, 2004
6,357
3,028
1,710
Quebec, canada
They are out?

That came out of the field

Yes they are. I think newegg.com in the US sold out very rapidly. NCIX canada too, but i think that's because they presold the thing. Vuugo just appeared on the day of launch, friday, 25$ cheaper than NCIX too.

But really, it's a ghost launch, i will receive the mobo this upcoming week but not a single unboxing or review yet, while we see the gigabyte one pop out more and more every day. Anyway, i guess everything will be fine anyway with it.
 

Nostremitus

Member
Mar 24, 2012
8,868
2
0
Seoul, ROK

Nokterian

Member
Jul 20, 2012
18,400
1
0
twitter.com
Which RAM do you both have?

I'm wondering if I'll see the same increases with my Ripjaws and X370 MSI Carbon when I get my computer back.
I shipped it ahead of me to the U.S. I'm moving from S.
Korea to the U.S. next week.

G.Skill Flare X F4-3200C14D-16GFX

It finally works as intended.

I bought this because it specifically works with Ryzen.
 

Toe-Knee

Member
Jan 10, 2017
1,508
390
390
Uk
MSI still doesn't have the newest BIOS with AGESA 1.0.0.6, but I got my 3000 MHz RAM to 2933 at 1.35V as-is, so I guess I can't complain too much. The sticks weren't even on the QVL.

This is regarding the B350M Gaming Pro board. There is a beta BIOS with it but I don't touch beta BIOS.


The bios updates have been really slow coming for that board.

The last one made my ram spazz out.

It was on the qvl and running happily at 2933 since launch but since the last update I need 1.37v just to get it to post at that speed. I'm not holding out hope for 3200 haha.

Should have stuck with the crucial ram.
 

RumblingRosco

Member
Oct 23, 2007
18,022
0
1,235

Doesn't help me much if I have a B350M Gaming Pro board :)

The bios updates have been really slow coming for that board.

The last one made my ram spazz out.

It was on the qvl and running happily at 2933 since launch but since the last update I need 1.37v just to get it to post at that speed. I'm not holding out hope for 3200 haha.

Should have stuck with the crucial ram.

It's weird, because my 3000 MHz RAM hit 2933 easily at 1.35V and it isn't even on the QVL. Same board on the most recent BIOS (April release I think?)... Even was fine on Prime95 blend tests. Ryzen RAM stuff is still a bit funky.
 

Darkstorne

Member
May 26, 2014
2,886
0
0
EDIT: By chipset I probably mean socket =P

Question about Zen CPUs: I know AMD have said they're committed to the same motherboard chipsets for a while, but have they specified how long that will last? Zen+ will definitely work with the same chipset, but what about Zen 2 and Zen 3? Do we have anything concrete on that or is it all just guesswork right now?

I ask because I wanted to delay building a new computer until late next year, but mine is really starting to play up and do odd things now (hard locks becoming scarily frequent) so I might have to start building today. I was hoping to wait for an 8 core 16 thread CPU at 4ghz+ stock speeds, turbo boost to 4.5ghz+, which I assume won't happen until Zen 2 or 3. If I can easily upgrade to those from a current gen Zen though then I have no concerns about building a PC this year.
 

Xyphie

Member
Oct 4, 2007
2,920
624
1,415
Somewhere
No one except AMD knows but a reasonable best case scenario for AM4 socket longevity is probably until DDR5 (~2020?) comes out. So Pinnacle Ridge and Zen 2 CPUs should work, but probably not Zen 3.
 

Darkstorne

Member
May 26, 2014
2,886
0
0
No one except AMD knows but a reasonable best case scenario for AM4 socket longevity is probably until DDR5 (~2020?) comes out. So Pinnacle Ridge and Zen 2 CPUs should work, but probably not Zen 3.

Okay, thanks =) I definitely don't want to wait that long to build a new PC! 2018 would be great though because I really want a single 4TB SSD. I hate managing a small SSD and a large HDD in my current PC, and just want to go back to the days of having one drive for everything. The price on that thing right now is well over £1000 though, which is hard to justify...

Plan was 2018 for a much cheaper 4TB SSD, a Zen+ CPU, and a GTX 1170 for affordable 4K gaming. I might have to stick with my 970 and 1080p monitor for now though so I can afford that 4TB SSD, and then upgrade the CPU, GPU, and monitor in a year or two. Not ideal...
 

Kayant

Member
Feb 25, 2014
6,015
0
0
Bought the ASRock AB350 fatal1ty gaming-ITX/AC on friday, as soon as they appeared in Canada actually on Vuugo.

But... still no reviews? No unboxing? Wow
There is only one review for gigabyte's it's so not too surprising. I would bet the x370 one would be the one that will reviewed most.

Also the only difference between the two is WiFi -
 

horkrux

Member
Mar 11, 2016
1,760
74
360
On my personal experience with an X370 Gaming Pro Carbon, stay away from MSI if you want to overclock. Spend a bit more money and actually invest on something good like the ASRock Taichi or the Asus Crosshair Hero VI.

Why? Is it because MSI doesn't offer an option for offset voltage?
 

Toe-Knee

Member
Jan 10, 2017
1,508
390
390
Uk
Doesn't help me much if I have a B350M Gaming Pro board :)



It's weird, because my 3000 MHz RAM hit 2933 easily at 1.35V and it isn't even on the QVL. Same board on the most recent BIOS (April release I think?)... Even was fine on Prime95 blend tests. Ryzen RAM stuff is still a bit funky.


Is definitely funky. Yeah that's the bios I'm hoping that the next one fixes it. At least it didn't mess up my oc.
 
Feb 9, 2007
3,512
19
1,160
Why? Is it because MSI doesn't offer an option for offset voltage?
I can only speak of my experience but I can only imagine it's not much different from other MSI models.
Poor memory compatibility. I can't achieve stable 4GHz OC because of poor quality VRMs even though I'm using an 1800X. No clear CMOS button, I have to short a jumper "strategically" positioned between the CPU and the graphics card.
I see people with the Taichi or CH6 getting consistently better results even with the same memory and processor I have. The truth is not all motherboards are the same even if they share the same chipset.
 

RumblingRosco

Member
Oct 23, 2007
18,022
0
1,235
Why? Is it because MSI doesn't offer an option for offset voltage?

I only just realized this today. It makes me wonder if just using auto voltage wouldn't be better for my MSI board as I'd then trade off high voltage during high load, but at least have low voltage during low load.

As it stands, I'm basically running 1.275 V any time my PC is on. I actually did the same thing with my i5-2500k at like 1.35 V if I remember correctly, because the ASRock board I had also had no easy way to use offsets.
 

TC McQueen

Member
Nov 9, 2013
5,368
2
380
I only just realized this today. It makes me wonder if just using auto voltage wouldn't be better for my MSI board as I'd then trade off high voltage during high load, but at least have low voltage during low load.

As it stands, I'm basically running 1.275 V any time my PC is on. I actually did the same thing with my i5-2500k at like 1.35 V if I remember correctly, because the ASRock board I had also had no easy way to use offsets.
There's always P-State overclocking. My R5 1600X downclocks to 2.2GHz whenever it's not running at 100% (3.9 GHz).
 

horkrux

Member
Mar 11, 2016
1,760
74
360
I can only speak of my experience but I can only imagine it's not much different from other MSI models.
Poor memory compatibility. I can't achieve stable 4GHz OC because of poor quality VRMs even though I'm using an 1800X. No clear CMOS button, I have to short a jumper "strategically" positioned between the CPU and the graphics card.
I see people with the Taichi or CH6 getting consistently better results even with the same memory and processor I have. The truth is not all motherboards are the same even if they share the same chipset.

Ah ok. Well that truly sucks

I only just realized this today. It makes me wonder if just using auto voltage wouldn't be better for my MSI board as I'd then trade off high voltage during high load, but at least have low voltage during low load.

As it stands, I'm basically running 1.275 V any time my PC is on. I actually did the same thing with my i5-2500k at like 1.35 V if I remember correctly, because the ASRock board I had also had no easy way to use offsets.

Problem I had with auto is that it just doesn't get high enough. So to overclock my 2600k further I would also have to nail it to something like 1.35V which seems wasteful.
 

opticalmace

Member
Dec 8, 2008
14,631
0
0
Bay Area
I only just realized this today. It makes me wonder if just using auto voltage wouldn't be better for my MSI board as I'd then trade off high voltage during high load, but at least have low voltage during low load.

As it stands, I'm basically running 1.275 V any time my PC is on. I actually did the same thing with my i5-2500k at like 1.35 V if I remember correctly, because the ASRock board I had also had no easy way to use offsets.
If you have a kill-a-watt you should check how much power your system actually uses. My Z170 board is a pain for setting up an offset voltage. However, by using a fixed voltage and enabling certain power (saving) states it actually doesn't use much power at low load, even with fixed frequency and vcore (I can't really tell you why). It only ends up being like a <10W penalty to keep it pegged, compared to auto or offset voltage. Just a thought.
 

RumblingRosco

Member
Oct 23, 2007
18,022
0
1,235
There's always P-State overclocking. My R5 1600X downclocks to 2.2GHz whenever it's not running at 100% (3.9 GHz).

If you have a kill-a-watt you should check how much power your system actually uses. My Z170 board is a pain for setting up an offset voltage. However, by using a fixed voltage and enabling certain power (saving) states it actually doesn't use much power at low load, even with fixed frequency and vcore (I can't really tell you why). It only ends up being like a <10W penalty to keep it pegged, compared to auto or offset voltage. Just a thought.

I'll need to look into P-state overclocking. I've heard of it but have zero concept of how to get it to work, so I've got some reading to do.
 

Paragon

Member
Aug 22, 2016
1,463
0
0
I've not seen much benefit to P-state overclocking with the C6H. The Ryzen Balanced power plan doesn't allow the CPU to downclock unless you modify it anyway.
C-states seem to be where 90% of the power savings come from, and the CPU can switch C-states in milliseconds. (it may even be every 1ms)
With the C6H, you just have to set them to "enabled" rather than "auto" when overclocking, and disable "core performance boost".
 

CazTGG

Member
Jan 24, 2015
4,019
0
0
www.youtube.com
The C6H and Taichi have the highest-spec VRMs, with the Gigabyte and MSI boards being lower-spec. If I recall correctly, it was 300A for C6H/Taichi, and 240A for Gigabyte/MSI.
Of course there's more to a board than just that, and it's not like current Ryzen CPUs are going to need that anyway.
The issue is that MSI's boards are the most expensive of all the AM4 boards, despite the lesser component choices.

The C6H supports 3600MT/s, and some people have even got RAM running faster than that.
It's likely that you will need specific memory kits though, and not all CPUs may be able to handle it since the memory controller is integrated in the CPU, and it's only specified for up to 3200MT/s operation.
Generally the X CPUs seem to have better luck with fast RAM.

ASUS' QVL list hasn't been updated since March, so there's nothing faster than 3200MT/s on it, but generally Samsung B-Die kits do well.
I have heard that all of Corsair's 3600MT/s kits of any rating are all Samsung B-Die, and the kit that I received was.
I had no trouble running that at 3600MT/s even before the AGESA 1.0.0.6 update, but I think I've been lucky with my CPU's IMC.
That said, I have also seen practically no difference in my own tests above 2666MT/s speeds, so I don't know that I would pay a premium for it.

Sounds like the C6H and Corsair are the way to go. Thanks!

Looking over your build, I'm puzzled to see a $300 sound card on there.
Unless you have very specific requirements, there's absolutely no reason for it.
I would either suggest using the on-board audio, a cheaper card like a $70 Sound Blaster Z, or an external device, depending on what your needs are.

I see that you also have the new WiFi AC version of the C6H in your basket, and a $100 USB WiFi adapter.

A pair of GTX 1080 Tis in SLI seems overkill for a 1440p G-Sync monitor too. I'm not sure if you just want "the best" or if you have a specific use for them.
I would rather ditch one and buy a higher-end display, like one of the 27" IPS 1440p165 monitors or a 34" ultrawide.
Though it's also worth mentioning that HDR models supporting higher refresh rates are said to be available before the end of the year.

Yeah, I forgot to remove the USB Wifi since I discovered there's a Wifi-integrated variant of the Hero VI motherboard when searching for the part on Part Picker and decided to go with that one. As for the SLI 1080 TIs, that's more a plan for the future when 4K gaming becomes more viable (the PC itself is going to be for work such as video production and audio recording in addition to gaming at 1440p for the time being) and thus is a placeholder with only one 1080 TI for the build as of this moment, as is the case with the current HDDs chosen for the RAID configuration and the screen in case a new screen comes out in Fall/Winter this year to replace my current 1080p screen.
 

Nostremitus

Member
Mar 24, 2012
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I can only speak of my experience but I can only imagine it's not much different from other MSI models.
Poor memory compatibility. I can't achieve stable 4GHz OC because of poor quality VRMs even though I'm using an 1800X. No clear CMOS button, I have to short a jumper "strategically" positioned between the CPU and the graphics card.
I see people with the Taichi or CH6 getting consistently better results even with the same memory and processor I have. The truth is not all motherboards are the same even if they share the same chipset.

I hit 4.0 with no problems on the Carbon with the 1700x, my issue is with RAM compatibility.

The board I'm having trouble overclocking on both RAM and CPU is the ASUS Prime X370-Pro.

Can't get stable above 3.6... So no point ever locking it at all... Can't get ram over stock.
 

Paragon

Member
Aug 22, 2016
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Sounds like the C6H and Corsair are the way to go. Thanks!
Like I said, nothing is a guarantee, but the 3600MT/s Corsair kits seemed like the best way to get a Samsung B-Die kit at the time that I built my system, even if you aren't going to be running it at 3600MT/s. Anything slower than that seemed to be random luck.
I'm not sure what the deal with the GSkill FlareX memory is. It was said to be picked specifically for Ryzen compatibility, but I've been reading about people not being able to hit the rated speeds.
Unless you really want RGB, it's generally recommended to avoid the GSkill RGB kits with Ryzen. (or perhaps any systems) They're prone to SPD corruption, and it seems like it's just a bad design.
Personally I just prefer to use a case with solid side panels. It's quieter and you don't have spend extra money on flashy components that perform the same as the "boring" ones.

Yeah, I forgot to remove the USB Wifi since I discovered there's a Wifi-integrated variant of the Hero VI motherboard when searching for the part on Part Picker and decided to go with that one. As for the SLI 1080 TIs, that's more a plan for the future when 4K gaming becomes more viable (the PC itself is going to be for work such as video production and audio recording in addition to gaming at 1440p for the time being) and thus is a placeholder with only one 1080 TI for the build as of this moment, as is the case with the current HDDs chosen for the RAID configuration and the screen in case a new screen comes out in Fall/Winter this year to replace my current 1080p screen.
"Future proofing" is a good way to throw away money.
Buy the GPU you need today, and upgrade later.
When Volta ships, you will likely be able to get 1080Ti performance for $400-500 with the 2070/2080 (or 1170/1180?) just as you could get 980Ti performance and more VRAM plus architectural improvements for $400 with the 1070.

Again, without knowing your specific requirements, I can't make a recommendation for audio hardware, but I can almost guarantee you do not need that sound card.
For "audio recording" you probably want a USB audio interface which has XLR inputs and phantom power, which could be something like a Steinberg UR22mkII, or a Scarlett 2i2.
 

coopolon

Member
Jan 13, 2010
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I'm a little confused about ryzen incompatibility with memory. It doesn't just work with any dd4 that fit into the motherboard? Does it require the higher speeds or would 2400 work?

I know there's a QVL somewhere, but I surprisingly can't find it anywhere, just people talking about it.
 
Sep 16, 2006
16,156
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Los Angeles
I'm a little confused about ryzen incompatibility with memory. It doesn't just work with any dd4 that fit into the motherboard? Does it require the higher speeds or would 2400 work?

I know there's a QVL somewhere, but I surprisingly can't find it anywhere, just people talking about it.

Generally, it had issues with clocking RAM above 2133 at launch. Ram was fine, just couldn't clock it that high, if at all past it. This is fixed with the last round of BIOS updates.
 

gt86

Member
Mar 12, 2014
216
65
480
Like I said, nothing is a guarantee, but the 3600MT/s Corsair kits seemed like the best way to get a Samsung B-Die kit at the time that I built my system, even if you aren't going to be running it at 3600MT/s. Anything slower than that seemed to be random luck.
I'm not sure what the deal with the GSkill FlareX memory is. It was said to be picked specifically for Ryzen compatibility, but I've been reading about people not being able to hit the rated speeds.
Unless you really want RGB, it's generally recommended to avoid the GSkill RGB kits with Ryzen. (or perhaps any systems) They're prone to SPD corruption, and it seems like it's just a bad design.
Personally I just prefer to use a case with solid side panels. It's quieter and you don't have spend extra money on flashy components that perform the same as the "boring" ones.

"Future proofing" is a good way to throw away money.
Buy the GPU you need today, and upgrade later.
When Volta ships, you will likely be able to get 1080Ti performance for $400-500 with the 2070/2080 (or 1170/1180?) just as you could get 980Ti performance and more VRAM plus architectural improvements for $400 with the 1070.

Again, without knowing your specific requirements, I can't make a recommendation for audio hardware, but I can almost guarantee you do not need that sound card.
For "audio recording" you probably want a USB audio interface which has XLR inputs and phantom power, which could be something like a Steinberg UR22mkII, or a Scarlett 2i2.


I will second this with the gskill trident rgb ram. Both sticks I bought had their spd corrupted, and seems like gskill blames everyone but themselves even when someone has written a script that proves it. I am now running corsiar vengeance rgb with no issues.
 

opticalmace

Member
Dec 8, 2008
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I'm a little confused about ryzen incompatibility with memory. It doesn't just work with any dd4 that fit into the motherboard? Does it require the higher speeds or would 2400 work?

I know there's a QVL somewhere, but I surprisingly can't find it anywhere, just people talking about it.

QVL are motherboard specific. So look up the mobos you're interested in. Any board will support memory at stock speeds (which is probably 2133 for Ryzen boards), but to run them faster (such as what they're rated at) you technically need to OC the memory controller or something to that effect.
 
D

Deleted member 325805

Unconfirmed Member
Is there a Ryzen CPU that would be a notable upgrade to a 3570k @ 4.3GHz?
 

TC McQueen

Member
Nov 9, 2013
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Is there a Ryzen CPU that would be a notable upgrade to a 3570k @ 4.3GHz?
R5 1600(X). If you're playing a Frostbite 3 game, you'll have lower overall core use, and if you're playing XCOM 2, you can use up to 4 cores to handle shaders and get a nice framerate increase.
 

Paragon

Member
Aug 22, 2016
1,463
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0
I'm a little confused about ryzen incompatibility with memory. It doesn't just work with any dd4 that fit into the motherboard? Does it require the higher speeds or would 2400 work?
I know there's a QVL somewhere, but I surprisingly can't find it anywhere, just people talking about it.

These are the memory speeds officially supported by Ryzen:

If you stick to that, you should have no trouble at all.

However lots of people are wanting to use faster memory speeds than that, which is where things get tricky.
In the old AGESA updates, memory sub-timings were hard-coded by AMD.
These sub-timings were very tight, which meant that basically nothing but Samsung B-Die RAM kits could handle them - and even then, possibly only with two DIMMs on most motherboards.

With the AGESA 1.0.0.6 update sub-timings are relaxed now, and you are able to adjust the sub-timings manually in the UEFI.
So many kits which could not handle high speeds with the very tight sub-timings that were being forced before, are now able to use more relaxed timings and work at their rated speeds.

Additionally, new multipliers were enabled, so that intermediate frequencies between the previous presets and above them can now be used.
Previously, the multiplier went in 1.33x increments, and maxed out at 16x. (100 x 16 x 2 = 3200MT/s)
Now they have added 2/3 increments, and it tops out at 20x. (100 x 20 x 2 = 4000MT/s)
However that does not change the fact that the memory controller used in the current Ryzen CPUs is only designed to handle 3200MT/s maximum, or the fact that any speeds higher than the slide posted above are still overclocks and not guaranteed.
There's just a much better chance that higher speed memory kits will now work at their rated speed after the AGESA 1.0.0.6 update.

The QVL list is a "qualified vendor list" which is motherboard specific.
Basically this is a list of components that the manufacturers have actually tested and verified as working with that motherboard.
Any hardware which meets the specs should work, but only hardware on the QVL list is certified to work.
AMD did also post a list of kits which should work, but I would not accept that as a guarantee unless they are also on your motherboard's QVL list.

I think I have been lucky, but by buying a 2x8GB 3600MT/s memory kit from Corsair which was a Samsung B-Die kit, I had no trouble running it at 3600MT/s right out of the box with my Crosshair VI.
However 3600MT/s speeds required a BCLK overclock, since the multiplier was previously locked to 16x. In my case that was 122.6 x 14.67 x 2 = 3596MT/s, which was more stable than 112.4 x 16 x 2. (16x had cold-boot issues)
Now that the 18x multiplier is unlocked, it should be possible to avoid a BCLK overclock and run 100 x 18 x 2 for 3600MT/s - if the IMC can handle it.
But I've since swapped that memory out for a 4x8GB ECC kit that runs at 2666MT/s in all four slots, and haven't had any stability issues at all - despite Ryzen only officially supporting 1866MT/s in that configuration.


Now none of this is really a problem, or unexpected.
It's just that this is AMD's first platform capable of DDR4 support, while Intel has been supporting it since 2015.
So Intel have had several revisions of memory controllers, and you now have boards that support upwards of 4200MT/s.
You still have the problem of kits rated for that speed being unable to support it stably unless you buy a high-end motherboard and get lucky with your CPU's IMC, it's just that most people aren't buying the bleeding-edge of DDR4 speeds.
And while not all CPUs may support 4200MT/s+ Intel does seem to generally support 3200MT/s+ better than Ryzen right now.

Most people with Intel CPUs are not running kits at the speeds that people with Ryzen CPUs are having trouble with though.
People forget that Skylake is only rated for 2400MT/s kits, and 2666MT/s for Skylake-X.
I think part of it was the "scare" when Ryzen launched, where it turned out that memory speeds affect the cross-CCX latency, but we now know that you quickly see diminishing returns for that above 2666MT/s.
Not that faster memory is worse, but that's what I would recommend you seek as a minimum speed for optimal performance.

I've also seen a lot of people on overclocking forums with 2133MT/s or 2400MT/s kits complaining that their memory won't run at faster speeds.
Memory manufacturers seem to be binning the higher-speed kits now, so anything which doesn't pass is sold as a lower speed kit.
There's no guarantee that when you buy slower components that it will overclock and run at a faster speed. That's why it's not being sold at those speeds.
There's no guarantee that the same kit would run at a higher speed on an Intel platform either.