Anybody else here a spiritual boomer?

Zenaku

Member
Feb 20, 2007
1,314
223
1,090
Yes. I'm supposedly a millenial at age 29, but I don't agree with that.

I grew up in the 90's. I grew up without access to mobile phones, tablets and the like. I suffered through dial-up, waiting days to download things. Before even getting my own slow ass internet I used to walk half-hour to the library every few weeks to use their computers and get game tips. I spent almost all of my childhood outside, climbing trees, jumping over Brooks and getting into mischief.

And I'm the same generation as kids that grew up with fast internet always at their fingertips, who spent their childhood indoors on phones, watching on demand TV, and enjoying all of life's modern perks? Nah.
 

King of Foxes

Member
Jan 9, 2018
1,310
2,086
600
Latvia
I see the zoomer has invaded with his low test estrogen fueled soy tunes


Buttrock is fucking garbage. You should literally be ashamed for unironically liking this. Do you like nirvana and nickelback too?
I'll make love to you until you adore me, homosexual.
 

Airola

Member
Jun 25, 2015
3,312
1,632
475
Finland
Yes. I'm supposedly a millenial at age 29, but I don't agree with that.

I grew up in the 90's. I grew up without access to mobile phones, tablets and the like. I suffered through dial-up, waiting days to download things. Before even getting my own slow ass internet I used to walk half-hour to the library every few weeks to use their computers and get game tips. I spent almost all of my childhood outside, climbing trees, jumping over Brooks and getting into mischief.

And I'm the same generation as kids that grew up with fast internet always at their fingertips, who spent their childhood indoors on phones, watching on demand TV, and enjoying all of life's modern perks? Nah.
You are wondering about that at 29. I'm 37 and supposedly am in the same category.
 

EightBit Man

Member
Jun 13, 2019
1,168
2,377
430
The Netherlands
There's no generation gap, but a generation abyss; people who grew up in the 80s don't even know what the fuck has happened in such a short amount of time. When it comes to popular culture I have absolutely nothing in common with today's youth. The way they dress, the way they talk, the stuff that they're into. And I'm not going to blame them either as they don't know any better. It's my generation who gave birth to these people who let everything go. Think my generation wasn't the best either, but at least we had something left...something human. Outside of that, there are bright and spiritually healthy young people, who see through the lies and artificiality of today, but they are a minority unfortunately.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ROMhack

ROMhack

Gold Member
Jul 14, 2018
2,051
1,903
590
Dunno but I'm 29 and spent a lot of time around 20/21 year olds during my master's last year (I was 28 then). It was like an ethnography study at times.

The most startling thing for me was their lack of curiosity. Having access to so much information seems to have altered how they perceive their relationship in the world. I suspect they don't think they can add anything unique to the world and subsequently retreat into bubbles so as not to fail - fear of failure is huge for that generation.

I also suspect that many are edgelords because they want to be different but feel far too connected to properly achieve it. They seem to rebel in a very laissez faire way, hence why they all get the same tattoos and dye their hair experimental colours (ie teal or pink). If others weren't doing that, I doubt they would either.

It was genuinely fascinating. Lovely people I should add.
 
Last edited:

-Minsc-

Member
Nov 14, 2009
2,892
250
795
ROMhack ROMhack Commercialized rebellion? There may be a better term for this idea. The rebellion of youth today is making people boat loads of money. Is the money factor any different from previous generations? I do not know. Being 37 I can look back and see how much of my "rebellion" was due to advertising. Actually, I'll call my case a delayed rebellion. Going into the internet after I graduated high school in 2000 I can see how I was towed along by the marketed rebellion. While I never had an interest in funky hair colours and tattoos, I did get caught up in video games, and YouTube. Where I've been noticing the disconnect is with the rise of streaming over the past decade. I sit there wondering why I'm watching someone play a video game or react to an anime when I instead could be playing a game or watching a show. Better yet, I could be doing something that brings in money to pay the bills.

From what I have observed over the years there's one good thing young people seem to have going for them. The absence of the Red Foreman "dumb ass" attitude. In the long run is that a good or bad thing? I don't know. All depends on whether or not it's genuine or fake.
 

EightBit Man

Member
Jun 13, 2019
1,168
2,377
430
The Netherlands
they all look like they're having a pretty good time to me
That's the surface level. Everything got so commercialized, so absolutely part of mass culture that genuine subcultures died. The distance between the DJ and the audience got larger and larger also. Believe me, there's a night and day difference between how things were (80s, 90s, 2000s), and how they are now. There was no social media, smartphones, and people actually bonded together on parties. Never liked the whole drug culture surrounding dance music, but at least it was more intimate and personal. :messenger_winking:
 
Last edited:

Breakage

Member
Mar 3, 2014
6,056
2,551
565
I don't get the tattoo obsession. I think it's disgusting. It's like a disease in England, even the educated middle classes are doing it:
 

EightBit Man

Member
Jun 13, 2019
1,168
2,377
430
The Netherlands
I don't get the tattoo obsession. I think it's disgusting. It's like a disease in England, even the educated middle classes are doing it:
Yeah, there was a post about this here, but did not reply to it. Think it's a horrible fad. There have been people wearing tattoos for quite a time now, but there's a definite rise of people sporting them. Think it looks cheap these days. especially on women. Some people who looked fairly attractive ruined their body for the sake of some fad. They will regret it later on, believe me. I'm not even going into the whole "bad for your health"-thing, but that's also a issue (lymph nodes).

Never had a problem with a small subculture, or a few individuals having a tiny tattoo somewhere, but it has become outrageous in my humble opinion.
 
Last edited:

Tesseract

Crushed by Thanos
Dec 7, 2008
37,967
12,021
1,380
girls with tats are my weakness, i dig it

tats in general i like, just not the cheap trashy makeshift stuff you get for $50 down the road

our meat flesh rots away and we die, you can do worse than battle scars and tats
 
Last edited:

EightBit Man

Member
Jun 13, 2019
1,168
2,377
430
The Netherlands
girls with tats are my weakness, i dig it

tats in general i like, just not the cheap trashy makeshift stuff you get for $50 down the road

our meat flesh rots away and we die, you can do worse than battle scars and tats
There's no denying that I find some women still attractive with it. But as with many things, some things don't fit every individual person.
Think it may depend on one's perception, of what looks good on oneself, because overdoing it is not a good thing. Some people have admitted they are addicted to getting tattoos.
 

-Minsc-

Member
Nov 14, 2009
2,892
250
795
The thing about getting tattoos is the reason behind doing so. For some reason people just like using their bodies as a canvas, that's fine. A tattoo can have a deep meaning to the individual These people won't regret it. Those who will are the people doing it just for the praise. A sane person with tattoos would tell a person to think long and hard before getting one of their own.

Tattoo addiction, I can see that. The high one receives from getting the "new". It would stem from the same reason we buy a lot of useless junk. Back to that word "commercialization". It's not about filling the supply for the demand. Instead it's about creating the demand and supply in order to make more money.

I wonder how things will go over the next fifty years. It seems something like the tattoo business is currently in an explosive boom (I've done no research on this, just an observation on the increasing number of people getting tattoos). Sooner or later there'll be a bust.
 

quickwhips

Member
Jan 26, 2009
6,326
722
945
38
I see the zoomer has invaded with his low test estrogen fueled soy tunes


Buttrock is fucking garbage. You should literally be ashamed for unironically liking this. Do you like nirvana and nickelback too?
How the fuck are nirvana and nickleback in the same sentence with like?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Godzilla Emu

quickwhips

Member
Jan 26, 2009
6,326
722
945
38
I don't get the tattoo obsession. I think it's disgusting. It's like a disease in England, even the educated middle classes are doing it:
That person is just stupid looking with or without tattoos.
 

ROMhack

Gold Member
Jul 14, 2018
2,051
1,903
590
ROMhack ROMhack Commercialized rebellion? There may be a better term for this idea. The rebellion of youth today is making people boat loads of money. Is the money factor any different from previous generations? I do not know. Being 37 I can look back and see how much of my "rebellion" was due to advertising. Actually, I'll call my case a delayed rebellion. Going into the internet after I graduated high school in 2000 I can see how I was towed along by the marketed rebellion. While I never had an interest in funky hair colours and tattoos, I did get caught up in video games, and YouTube. Where I've been noticing the disconnect is with the rise of streaming over the past decade. I sit there wondering why I'm watching someone play a video game or react to an anime when I instead could be playing a game or watching a show. Better yet, I could be doing something that brings in money to pay the bills.

From what I have observed over the years there's one good thing young people seem to have going for them. The absence of the Red Foreman "dumb ass" attitude. In the long run is that a good or bad thing? I don't know. All depends on whether or not it's genuine or fake.
Yeah that's about the crux of it. I also think that's where we can tie in the explosion of tattoos as we're living in an age defined by short-form visual language.

YouTube. Emojis. Tattoos. Selfies. Tweets. Colorful hair. They all kinda fit together to make up the 'commercialized rebellion' of millennial culture.
 
Last edited:

ROMhack

Gold Member
Jul 14, 2018
2,051
1,903
590
There's no denying that I find some women still attractive with it. But as with many things, some things don't fit every individual person.
Think it may depend on one's perception, of what looks good on oneself, because overdoing it is not a good thing. Some people have admitted they are addicted to getting tattoos.
Being cynical, I think they're also addicted to showing them off and getting feedback.

The amount of new tattoo pictures I see on Instagram is kinda crazy (twice this week alone and I only follow 80 people).
 
Last edited:

EightBit Man

Member
Jun 13, 2019
1,168
2,377
430
The Netherlands
Being cynical, I think they're also addicted to showing them off and getting feedback.

The amount of new tattoo pictures I see on Instagram is kinda crazy (twice this week alone and I only follow 80 people).
It would not surprise me one bit. In this age of desperately seeking validation this might as well be another outgrowth of that. The whole SJW-phenomenon is also just that, with it's virtue signaling. "Look much on a moral high ground I am", and everybody that opposes me should be put to silence.

And this...

I also think that's where we can tie in the explosion of tattoos as we're living in an age defined by short-form visual language.

YouTube. Emojis. Tattoos. Selfies. Tweets. Colorful hair. They all kinda fit together to make up the 'commercialized rebellion' of millennial culture.
...nails it. I think a lot of people are just empty inside, bringing nothing from within. And while that has been the case for a while now, it's just at it's worst now. No creativity, no self-esteem, no inspiration. The rise in drug abuse (legal and illegal) in the United States should tell us also something. People want to escape from this whole circus, but a lot choose the wrong solution, either by merging themselves completely with some group, or by dropping out completely.
 
  • Thoughtful
Reactions: ROMhack