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Anyone here have Roku?

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Oblivion

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I'm spending a shitload on cable T.V., which I'm not even really utilizing but I've kept it around mostly cause my mom watches her Indian channels on it. I'd like to get rid of this entirely and I've heard that you can watch Indian channels on this Roku thing (which I've only heard of in the past few weeks). How does this work exactly?
 

wondermega

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I'm certainly not the authority on it, but people I know love it (I mean LOOOOOOOOVE IT). About 100 bucks, it looks like a thumb drive & plugs into the HDMI slot on your TV. Comes with a little remote to navigate.

It's basically like the media portion of Xbox 360 without the ability to read discs/play games. You can log into Amazon video, Netflix, YouTube, etc. it's really really nice - I'm sure you can find an exhaustive YouTube review of it to see all the features.
 

Duress

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Are you watching Indian channels on your cable subscription? I think you need to have one, to add it on a Roku.
 

ZedIndyLil

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I have used an old Roku LT and liked it a ton. I think it may be the best choice for streaming, as it's provider-agnostic and has those funky off-the-grid channels if that's your thing.
 

BIGWORM

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1. Get an Amazon Fire TV (also $100).
2. Root it.
3. Install Google Play Store.
4. Get an Amazon Fire Controller ($40)
5. ???
6. Streaming/emulation heaven.
 

BPoole

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I can't speak for Indian channel functionality (though I know there is an international station category, so I'm sure it's there), but I've had a Roku 2 XD for about 2 years and use it almost every day
 

Raistlin

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1. Get an Amazon Fire TV (also $100).
2. Root it.
3. Install Google Play Store.
4. Get an Amazon Fire Controller ($40)
5. ???
6. Streaming/emulation heaven.
1) I don't think you can root current Fire TV's? Aren't they coming with a new enough firmware that prevents it?
2) Did the OP in any way indicate he cares about emulators?
3) Who says it has apps for the streaming services he's looking for? He brought up Roku specifically because it has some of the niche content he's looking for. Roku has a far larger selection of apps than the competition. On the order of hundreds.
4) ???
5) Fail



I have both, and love my FireTV too ... but I'm not sure it's what the OP needs in this case
 

Alphahawk

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I think Dish has an app for their customers outside the U.S so I imagine that's what you would have to use. You wouldn't be able to get rid of the subscription as you need it to login and stuff.
 

BIGWORM

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1) I don't think you can root current Fire TV's? Aren't they coming with a new enough firmware that prevents it?
2) Did the OP in any way indicate he cares about emulators?
3) Who says it has apps for the streaming services he's looking for? He brought up Roku specifically because it has some of the niche content he's looking for. Roku has a far larger selection of apps than the competition. On the order of hundreds.
4) ???
5) Fail



I have both, and love my FireTV too ... but I'm not sure it's what the OP needs in this case
Just giving him options, calm down. OP didn't specify he was looking exclusively for a Roku. Hell, we don't even know if he is/was aware of Amazon's equivalent, hence why I brought it up.
 
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I have Roku 2 HD on one TV and Apple TV on the other. I prefer the Apple TV. It has a nicer OS, better Netflix app, is a lot faster, and Neflix streams start quickly in full HD where as the Roku buffers for several seconds and then displays blurry video for a minute or so until it gets up to full HD. If you have an iPad and/or iPhone the Airplay streaming is awesome as well.

The Roki does have a lot more channel options, but nothing I watch isn't on the Apple TV. The newer model Rokus probably improve speed etc from the 2 I'd guess.

I'm not a cable cutter as I'm too into sports, especially college sports, and it's tomjard to find decent streams. Especially since I have to have TV service to stream Watch ESPN.
 

CrankyJay

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Just giving him options, calm down. OP didn't specify he was looking exclusively for a Roku. Hell, we don't even know if he is/was aware of Amazon's equivalent, hence why I brought it up.
Raistlin is like a belligerent drunk when discussing tech stuff with people, in person or on the Internet.
 

bronson

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The newer model Rokus probably improve speed etc from the 2 I'd guess.
Yeah I just upgraded from a Roku 2 to a Roku 3 and it makes a world of difference. The channels/OS are tons faster and the video quality is much better.

It really all comes down to the channels you need.
 

Tragicomedy

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I have two Rokus and the Amazon Fire Stick. There's not really much comparison. Roku is far better, and doesn't force your home screen into Amazon choices. Everything on the Roku is front and center, and it has every app imaginable.

Amazon lacks stuff like Vudu, and I can't remember if it has HBO Go. Roku has everything.
 

Laekon

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Have a Roku XD or XS and love it. It's a generation or two old but still works great. Has a lot more options than an Apple TV. No idea if it has the channels you need or not as I just stick to the basics like Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon.
 

Raistlin

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Just giving him options, calm down. OP didn't specify he was looking exclusively for a Roku. Hell, we don't even know if he is/was aware of Amazon's equivalent, hence why I brought it up.
Raistlin is like a belligerent drunk when discussing tech stuff with people, in person or on the Internet.
I assumed the spoiler made it clear I was just fucking around :\
 

DarkFlow

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I'm certainly not the authority on it, but people I know love it (I mean LOOOOOOOOVE IT). About 100 bucks, it looks like a thumb drive & plugs into the HDMI slot on your TV. Comes with a little remote to navigate.

It's basically like the media portion of Xbox 360 without the ability to read discs/play games. You can log into Amazon video, Netflix, YouTube, etc. it's really really nice - I'm sure you can find an exhaustive YouTube review of it to see all the features.
That's a Roku Stick, and not $100. I also wouldn't get the stick because it's pretty slow with the UI. Roku 2 or 3 are your best options.
 

Raistlin

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That's a Roku Stick, and not $100. I also wouldn't get the stick because it's pretty slow with the UI. Roku 2 or 3 are your best options.
Yeah from the impressions I've seen, the Roku stick takes a pretty serious performance hit versus the set-top box.
 

overcast

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Yeah from the impressions I've seen, the Roku stick takes a pretty serious performance hit versus the set-top box.
Oh really? I was considering it. So the 2 is better than any of the sticks on the market? I've been considering these lately.
 

MisterNoisy

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Check woot periodically - they have refurbed Roku 3s for $60 or so pretty regularly. They're best of breed for streaming boxes. Apple has let the AppleTV languish without an update for way too long and while the FireTV is decent, the Roku still has it beat for overall experience.
 

jts

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Roku 3 is a fine machine, save for the hardcoded Google DNS. Not recommend if you plan to "travel" a lot.
 

darkazcura

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DishWorld for Indian TV. It's an IPTV service and is completely separate from Dish's satellite service. There is a Roku app that works pretty damn well if you have a good internet connection. First three months are $15..promotional offer. Depending on what language your mom watches for Indian TV, there are a variety of packages available ranging from $20-45 after the promotional period. Allows you to watch any program aired within the last 8 days so DVR isn't really necessary if that's something your mom would be worried about. Couple that with the upcoming SlingTV ($20/month), and I have pretty much everything I need for the house for both my mother and me. Even without SlingTV, I'm pretty much covered between Hulu, Netflix, and Amazon, where the subscription costs are shared between my girlfriend, my brother, and me. I use the AppleTV in my bedroom personally because I like the interface better, but the Roku has been great for my mom, and it's good enough for me when I use the family room every now and then.

https://www.dishworld.com
 

Raistlin

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Oh really? I was considering it. So the 2 is better than any of the sticks on the market? I've been considering these lately.
Fire stick has much better hardware than the roku stick, so it suffers less.

I still prefer the boxes though. Faster hardware, expandable memory, better antennas, plus Ethernet as an option.
 

element

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Fire TV is the best streamer out there IMO. Especially since you can sideload stuff so easy and it is FAST!

Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime, XBMC/Kodi, Spotify, HBO|GO.

YuppTV is also available, though it appears they have paid services now.

Not sure what else you would need.
 

darkazcura

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Fire TV is the best streamer out there IMO. Especially since you can sideload stuff so easy and it is FAST!

Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime, XBMC/Kodi, Spotify, HBO|GO.

Not sure what else you would need.
Well the OP is looking for something that has Indian channels for his mother based on his post. DishWorld on the Roku has been the best and most reliable way to tackle this of all the solutions I've seen out there. You could side load the DishWorld app onto the FireTV I suppose potentially, but I've found their mobile apps to be worse than the one on the Roku, which is pretty good.

EDIT: YuppTV is alright. DishWorld has better selection, but I guess it really depends on what his mom actually watches..
 

OnionPowder

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I love my Roku. My wife and I use it every single day. I'd say it's worth it even if you keep your cable sub. They even have a giantbomb channel on it.
 

vikki

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My Roku is very underutilized. I like it, a lot, but I've got other things going on so I don't use it very often.

Wish I could help your mom get her Pavitra Rishta on, but I'm no good.
 

Casimir

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- Roku
- Netflix
- Hulu Plus
- HBO Go when it comes out

Much, MUCH cheaper than cable/satellite.
Sports subscriptions kill the benefits for fans however. On top of them having odd exclusions.

I priced it out for my own curiosity after hearing a friend complain about it.
 

darkazcura

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Sports subscriptions kill the benefits for fans however. On top of them having odd exclusions.

I priced it out for my own curiosity after hearing a friend complain about it.
This is true for baseball and football fans, but there are interesting alternatives for hockey and basketball fans available..
 

C.Dark.DN

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I have a 2 XD. I never liked the build quality, OS, or 90 day warranty. But, it has worked without issue for 2 years. I think back then apple tv was only 720p and it had certain apps before others. I don't see myself ever buying a new roku these days tho.
 

Marty Chinn

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Fire TV is the best streamer out there IMO. Especially since you can sideload stuff so easy and it is FAST!

Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime, XBMC/Kodi, Spotify, HBO|GO.

YuppTV is also available, though it appears they have paid services now.

Not sure what else you would need.
Yep, the Fire TV is my go to device right now and highly recommended. I've tried a ton of devices for XBMC but this one stands out to me since I can integrate Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, HBO Go, etc all into XBMC seamlessly.
 

sn00zer

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1. Get an Amazon Fire TV (also $100).
2. Root it.
3. Install Google Play Store.
4. Get an Amazon Fire Controller ($40)
5. ???
6. Streaming/emulation heaven.
OP: "Hey my mom wants to watch Indian channels"
Neogaf: "Rootkit an Amazon Fire to play SNES games"
 

Schlep

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Also less content and more fragmented. Nothing stacks up to cable or satellite right now but it also costs more.
Cable and satellite are really only good now for local sports fans and people who entertain themselves by flipping stations. I would be shocked if someone could not fill whatever time they allocate to TV with programming from Netflix, Hulu, HBO Go, and locals.
 

Marty Chinn

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Cable and satellite are really only good now for local sports fans and people who entertain themselves by flipping stations. I would be shocked if someone could not fill whatever time they allocate to TV with programming from Netflix, Hulu, HBO Go, and locals.
It's not just about filling the time, but having available all the content. If it was about filling time, I'm sure you could do that with Netflix alone. It's also not about flipping stations either. Let's say I want to keep up with The Walking Dead. How do I do that with Netflix, Hulu, HBO Go and locals? You can't. What if I wanted to catch the Video Game Awards? I couldn't. Sharknado? Couldn't do that either. There's a lot of event content and shows not found on Hulu if you're keeping up to date. The only way to get all that is with cable or satellite. Also legally, you can't get HBO Go right now without a cable subscription. That'll change soon, but I wonder at what cost? Nothing beats cable or satellite right now.
 

overcast

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Fire stick has much better hardware than the roku stick, so it suffers less.

I still prefer the boxes though. Faster hardware, expandable memory, better antennas, plus Ethernet as an option.
People are confusing me. So I'll probably just go Roku if i go box. Fire stick if I go that route.
 

Marty Chinn

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People are confusing me. So I'll probably just go Roku if i go box. Fire stick if I go that route.
That makes no sense. Fire TV is more powerful than a Roku too when it comes to a box. Plus whether you go stick or box, they're very similar products with just the difference being mostly performance and some additional ports. At the heart, a Roku stick is a weaker Roku and a Fire TV stick is a weaker Fire TV. So it doesn't make sense to pick one for a box or the other for a stick.
 

Schlep

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Marty, I'm gonna pick on you, because I remember debating Dreamcast stuff with you on Usenet 16 years ago. We're both getting old, and this is a very old way of thinking.

It's not just about filling the time, but having available all the content. If it was about filling time, I'm sure you could do that with Netflix alone.
That's basically making a case for the $125-150 cable bundles that have HBO, Showtime, Starz, and Cinemax. Gotta have Game of Thrones, Homeland, Outlander, and The Knick, right? Have to have Netflix too for House of Cards, Orange is The New Black, and Marco Polo. Probably throw in Amazon for Alpha House. Hulu for Blue and Deadbeat. Watch anime? Throw in Crunchyroll and possibly Funimation too.

You'll be up to $200 by the time you're done acquiring 'all the content'. It's something I notice that's very common in articles talking about this. You'll see an old(er) journalist stating how 'everyone wants a la carte, but will flinch at the cost compared with all the value you get with cable'. It's not a matter of having everything, it's a matter of finding what you like and being efficient about your money and time.

It's also not about flipping stations either. Let's say I want to keep up with The Walking Dead. How do I do that with Netflix, Hulu, HBO Go and locals? You can't.
You can get a season pass on Amazon.

What if I wanted to catch the Video Game Awards? I couldn't.
Really?

Sharknado? Couldn't do that either.
Both Sharknado and Sharknado 2 are on Netflix.

There's a lot of event content and shows not found on Hulu if you're keeping up to date. The only way to get all that is with cable or satellite.
I guess; I have no idea what you're into. I've looked into cutting cable completely before, but I haven't so far because of Dallas area teams. If I did, the only shows I'd get season passes for are The Strain, Halt and Catch Fire, and maybe Vikings. That'd be $80 a year for those three series.

Also legally, you can't get HBO Go right now without a cable subscription. That'll change soon, but I wonder at what cost? Nothing beats cable or satellite right now.
Most cable internet providers have a package now that's internet+locals+hbo. Usual price is $50-60 a month.
 

Marty Chinn

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Marty, I'm gonna pick on you, because I remember debating Dreamcast stuff with you on Usenet 16 years ago. We're both getting old, and this is a very old way of thinking.
Sure, let's go for it.

That's basically making a case for the $125-150 cable bundles that have HBO, Showtime, Starz, and Cinemax. Gotta have Game of Thrones, Homeland, Outlander, and The Knick, right? Have to have Netflix too for House of Cards, Orange is The New Black, and Marco Polo. Probably throw in Amazon for Alpha House. Hulu for Blue and Deadbeat. Watch anime? Throw in Crunchyroll and possibly Funimation too.

You'll be up to $200 by the time you're done acquiring 'all the content'. It's something I notice that's very common in articles talking about this. You'll see an old(er) journalist stating how 'everyone wants a la carte, but will flinch at the cost compared with all the value you get with cable'. It's not a matter of having everything, it's a matter of finding what you like and being efficient about your money and time.
A cable sub will get you roughly 90% or more of the content before you even approach the premium channels like HBO. The same can't be said about cord cutting solutions. And it's not just about pure content. It's the combination of unified interface versus fragmented interface, the timing of availability, and the pure amount of content. Cord cutting makes more sense if you don't keep up or you don't watch a lot. Cable/satellite is better if you watch a lot and keep up to date, plus all the one off shows and events that take place too.

You can get a season pass on Amazon.
At $42 for one show and won't be available until the next day. That's practically the price of a month of service. Add in those other services, and you might as well just get cable.

Ok, that wasn't the best example, but there are plenty of event programming that you'll miss out right or won't be able to watch live when other people are.

Both Sharknado and Sharknado 2 are on Netflix.
How long after it aired though? Certainly not in time to watch when they aired to join in on the circus.The key thing is timing. Nothing comes close.

I guess; I have no idea what you're into. I've looked into cutting cable completely before, but I haven't so far because of Dallas area teams. If I did, the only shows I'd get season passes for are The Strain, Halt and Catch Fire, and maybe Vikings. That'd be $80 a year for those three series.
I watch a decent amount of TV and doing season passes from the likes of Amazon ends up being more expensive going that route. At $3 an episode, that's 20 hours of TV a month, or 5 shows. If you watch more than that, you're not saving anything.

Most cable internet providers have a package now that's internet+locals+hbo. Usual price is $50-60 a month.
That assumes you want to go with your cable provider. Here, that's Comcast and they have a cap. No thanks on a cap.

As it stands as far as prompt availability, unified interface, and pure amount of content and availability, nothing stacks up to cable/satellite. The only reason to not do it is you don't watch much TV or the price is too high for you. Price aside, it's unmatched for cord cutting.
 

Oblivion

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Thanks for some of the suggestions guys, but I do want to point out that all I really wanted was to let my mom see here Indian channels.
 

element

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I have cable only for ESPN and regional sports, but watch all my TV via my NAS & FireTV :D

Thanks for some of the suggestions guys, but I do want to point out that all I really wanted was to let my mom see here Indian channels.
Ease of use, Roku because it has DishWorld native, but that is additional $15/month. You can sideload DishWorld on Fire TV box, but have to use a keyboard to type in the account info. YuppTV is available on both native, but again additional monthly charge.
 

Oblivion

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You can sideload DishWorld on Fire TV box, but have to use a keyboard to type in the account info.
That doesn't seem so bad. I presume I'd only have to type in the account info once, no?
 

element

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That doesn't seem so bad. I presume I'd only have to type in the account info once, no?
That is my impression from what people have said online. Main issue is that it only works on the Fire TV Box, not the Fire TV Stick. No USB on the stick, so can't plug in a keyboard.
 

Schlep

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A cable sub will get you roughly 90% or more of the content before you even approach the premium channels like HBO. The same can't be said about cord cutting solutions.
Again, it depends on which content you're looking for. Out of the shows I watch, and I watch a lot, the only one I would've had to pay for this Fall/Winter would've been American Horror Story, and that's mostly for my gf. Archer has just started and I forgot about that one, but honestly, it's not something I need to see day 1.

And it's not just about pure content. It's the combination of unified interface versus fragmented interface, the timing of availability, and the pure amount of content.
This I completely agree with. It is much easier to browse the guide on my Verizon box than it is to jump around services on the Roku. However, Roku search does negate some of that in being able to find specific things. What's finally being addressed in newer TVs (and hopefully the next Roku) is being able to jump services without having to exit what you're in currently back to a home menu. That's annoying.

Cord cutting makes more sense if you don't keep up or you don't watch a lot.
This I don't agree with. My gf watches just as much TV as I do, but doesn't pay for cable. She probably even watches more than I do, to be honest.

Cable/satellite is better if you watch a lot and keep up to date, plus all the one off shows and events that take place too.
Well, anyone who is obsessed with TV should have cable. I mean, Verizon rents a DVR that records 12 shows at once, so I guess they exist, haha. Not sure what the events are you're talking about.

At $42 for one show and won't be available until the next day. That's practically the price of a month of service. Add in those other services, and you might as well just get cable.
Waiting 12 hours is that big of a deal? My point is more that you can patch the holes with 2-3 shows, but if you literally watch a dozen different cable exclusive shows (non-TBS/TNT) and need to watch them instantly, then yeah cable will be the better deal.

How long after it aired though? Certainly not in time to watch when they aired to join in on the circus.The key thing is timing. Nothing comes close.
I'm seeing your argument as more towards immediacy, and yeah, it'll be a while before streaming services have everything, ever immediately.

I watch a decent amount of TV and doing season passes from the likes of Amazon ends up being more expensive going that route. At $3 an episode, that's 20 hours of TV a month, or 5 shows. If you watch more than that, you're not saving anything.
There's five shows exclusive to cable right now that you're watching?
 

Marty Chinn

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Again, it depends on which content you're looking for. Out of the shows I watch, and I watch a lot, the only one I would've had to pay for this Fall/Winter would've been American Horror Story, and that's mostly for my gf. Archer has just started and I forgot about that one, but honestly, it's not something I need to see day 1.
What do you consider a lot? A lot of stuff I talk about with other people who watch live or shows I'm highly interested in that I do want to keep up. Plus I hate spoilers and GAF is riddled with them even in gif form. There's also a lot of discussion here on current shows. So I like to keep up.

This I don't agree with. My gf watches just as much TV as I do, but doesn't pay for cable. She probably even watches more than I do, to be honest.
If you watch a lot of TV, cable/satellite provides a wealth of content that isn't available anywhere else often because it's first run. Cable/satellite makes sense if you watch a lot of TV.

Not sure what the events are you're talking about.
There's always unique events. Made for TV movies like Sharknado or the occasional terrible SyFy movie that is a bit of an event viewing moment. Or a mini series like Ascension that just aired. That's not including things like E3 press conferences where you don't have to deal with terrible streams or streams dropping out and you get them in HD and 60 fps which the streams almost never are. Then there's the occasional mini series, holiday special, documentary, etc. There's a ton of non regular programming that happens.

Waiting 12 hours is that big of a deal? My point is more that you can patch the holes with 2-3 shows, but if you literally watch a dozen different cable exclusive shows (non-TBS/TNT) and need to watch them instantly, then yeah cable will be the better deal.


I'm seeing your argument as more towards immediacy, and yeah, it'll be a while before streaming services have everything, ever immediately.
Shows being available in a timely manner is important, yes. I don't want to wait a year for it to show up on Netflix. Waiting 12 hours is a big deal when you have to wait 12 hours and pay for all that content on top of that. If you're streaming them from sites that do put them online, then I have to deal with commercials.

There's five shows exclusive to cable right now that you're watching?
Off the top of my head The Americans, American Horror Story, Orphan Black, The Walking Dead, Star Wars Rebels, Archer, Bates Motel, Fargo, The Last Ship, The Strain, Falling Skies, and Pretty Little Liars. I'm sure I'm missing some, but that's 12 right there. That's not even including Better Call Saul coming up or premium channels.
 
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