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Control Has More Aggressive, Involving Gameplay and More Environmental Storytelling than Quantum Break - PS5 And Scarlett SSD Inclusion Is “Fantastic”

IbizaPocholo

NeoGAFs Kent Brockman
Dec 1, 2014
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We recently sat down for an interview with Mikael Kasurinen and Brooke Maggs, director and narrative designer on the game respectively, and asked them about what lessons they’ve taken from Quantum Break going into Control, and the developers ended up mentioning a lot of the aforementioned things, calling the gameplay “more aggressive, more involving” and possible much more challenging, especially in the beginning stages as players get to grips with its systems.

“With Quantum Break, we tried to find a good balance between cinematic style and gameplay,” they said. “But it often led to compromise we wanted to avoid. In Control, we, for instance, kind of rethought how to capture animation in the sense of the control you have over the character, and so on. Everything is way more responsive, immediate, clean and clear. The gameplay is more aggressive, more involving, you need to really pay attention and learn, invest yourself into the experience to succeed. Initially it could be a challenging game, but once you respect what it’s putting in front of you, it’s a lot of fun. I think that’s one thing that we wanted to make more, something that demands participation from the player— so it’s not just something that you run through and you’re done.”

It’s not just with gameplay, though, that Control differs from past Remedy efforts. It expands upon their narrative formula as well. With things such as audio logs, optional side missions, and other avenues to be able to expand the story and the game’s world, with Control, Remedy are employing more and new narrative techniques- which also includes a lot more environmental storytelling than ever before. That said, the game will still have some live action storytelling, if not nearly as much as there was in Quantum Break.

“We also explored new ways for Remedy to tell stories,” said the developers. “So there’s a lot more environmental storytelling, audio logs to uncover,
documents, we have side missions in Control, which is new to Remedy games. [Previous games have] largely been tailored, beautiful, linear, single-player games. Where is with Control, we have this open-ended world, which means you can come across side missions earlier in the game, documents point you towards things to investigate.

“We also have a story where you can ask characters more about aspects of the world, and how they’re involved in them. So I think Control’s a different game in that sense. There is more storytelling that was live-action in Quantum Break. We still have live-action in Control— that is a part of Remedy games. But we’ve used it in a more specific way, I think. It’s more integrated into the world than what we did in Quantum Break.

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We recently sat down for a chat about the upcoming Control with Remedy’s Mikael Kasurinen and Brooke Maggs, director and narrative designer on the game respectively, and eventually got around to asking them about what their thoughts are on what we know of the upcoming next gen consoles so far. More specifically, we asked them about their SSDs- and they’re quite excited about that bit in particular.


“Well, having an SSD is fantastic because it deals with a lot of streaming issues that games tend to have,” the Remedy devs said to GamingBolt. “I’m with everybody else, I hate those slow moving elevators where you need to wait until a new part of the world loads up. Or awkward tunnels that you have to walk through. Getting rid of all of that is good news for everybody.


“And of course, we all love more powerful hardware. It allows us to do creative, striking visual things, and so on. Especially, because we as a studio, strive for really high fidelity. We’re down for technical and visual achievements as well. So I think that’s good news.”

Thanks mods for the title change:pie_grinning:
 
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IbizaPocholo

NeoGAFs Kent Brockman
Dec 1, 2014
25,176
24,949
1,335
ibiza

We recently sat down for an interview with Mikael Kasurinen and Brooke Maggs, director and narrative designer on the game respectively.

When asked about how long an average playthrough of the game would be, they told us that though they don’t have exact numbers right now – owing to the fact it’s a “complicated, large game” and “can be played through in multiple ways”, it’s going to be roughly 15-20 hours long if you finish the campaign and do “a few side missions” along the way- which seems like a really good length for the game, especially since it promises to be pretty replayable with its much more systemic gameplay.
 
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Filben

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Even MORE aggressive!? Dig it!

I hope they didn't do the faux pas of including audio logs you can't hear while keep running. I hate it when games slow down the pace with audio logs and you have to stand still.
 
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I like this is a Metroidvania sort of game, that makes it much more interesting than QB, besides the intriguing story and atmosphere.