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Does anyone here actually like equipment damage and repairs in games(specifically RPGs)?

DragoonKain

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There have been games where it's not a huge deal, there have been games where I loathe it. But I can't ever say it has made a game better by having it in there. It doesn't really add realism because any damage your armor takes in battles has the realism cancelled out by having to repair say a bow or a gun after like 50 uses, which is not realistic at all. In the end, it just feels like an artificial way to make a game more "challenging" to developers when to us all it does it make inventory management more of a nuisance.

I guess if I had to reach for a positive and this is really reaching... in games that have a lot of loot and reward you with the same weapons and equipment over and over again, items damaging and becoming useless and/or breaking makes those hundred copies of "Iron mail" and "steel swords" you have actually useful instead of just purposeless loot. But in that case, the devs should just tweak the game so you don't get as much of the same loot at that point.
 
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Rhaknam

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Yeah, I didn't like this mechanic in System Shock 2. Weapons seemed to break easily and the repair tools were hard to come by. I did still end up finishing the game and very much enjoyed the atmosphere, audio and level design but I have to stop short of calling it a masterpiece because of this single design choice.
 
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Big waste of time, although for realism lovers it adds to it.

The dumbest is Diablo. Your equipment wears down needing repairs at the blacksmith.

Cost 100,000 gold.

Gold on hand. 10,000,000.
 
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Dargor

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I dont like it neither, its always something that either hinders you artificially (things break way too fast) or doesn't mean anything (things dont break fast enough to matter).

But I have to say, I always liked the idea of fiding stuff broken or damaged and then fixing them. Like you find a rusted out gun and it doesn't work or fails alot, then you fix it and from that point on it doesnt break anymore.
 

Danjin44

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This might be unpopular opinion but I rather see weapons just break with no repairing mechanics over wasting my time repairing weapons. I LOVE Bloodborne but repairing weapons is such waste of time, it doesn't even add to the challenge because it doesn't take that much Blood Echoes to repair them.
 
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Yeah.. Repairing weapons in Dark Cloud.... Just by thinking about it is pissing me off till this day.
I actually feel like the mechanic was fine in this 1 instance because of the upgrade mechanics and survival mechanic in the dungeon. It seems integral to how the game is supposed to be played.

Buuut I also have never beat the game lol
 

Meted

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Like any mechanic it can be good depending on the implementation in the game, but it usually is just a hindrance and is just tedious. I think dark souls 2 was the only one that had a repair system that actually made you think about what weapons and equipment to use. all weapons had way less durability than the games before and after it but they would auto repair at the bonfire, if you did end up breaking the weapon before that you would have to pay a large amount of souls to repair it at the blacksmith. Katanas ended up being more realistically brittle and you might need to change out to another weapon mid run or commit one of your ring slots to a durability ring
 
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zenspider

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I don’t think it in and of itself is supposed to be a fun mechanic, but in games like Dark Souls and Breath of the Wild, they add tension that makes the overall experience fun.
In other games it can go to hell, but I think it comes down to how it balances other systems and affects the overall experience.
 

theHFIC

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Probably the main reason why I really didn't get into Breath of the Wild as much as I did previous Zelda games. The weapons wearing out over time mechanic added to it is a real deterrent for me. I think I got 1 and a 1/2 divine beasts in and called it day.
 
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Woo-Fu

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I sort of like when things can wear out/break in games. It means there's an opportunity cost involved in using that really good piece of gear. Do I use it now to make progression a little bit easier or do I save it for something potentially more challenging down the road? Yes, I'm that guy who ended up with a building that was a foot deep in potions/scrolls/whatever in practically every Elder Scrolls games.

What's the alternative? You end up throwing away/selling for coppers gear you outlevel anyhow. If on the other hand they give you something good enough to use the entire game you complain about the lack of progression.
 
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Belmonte

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I like in many cases.

When done right, it adds another strategy layer since the weapon itself is a resource to manage.

Crystal Weapons in Dark Souls are extra special because of the durability. Gameplay and lore wise. In Dark Souls 2 my main weapon had low durability and because of it, I had to make some interesting choices at many moments. Like an unexpected powerful foe appears and I need to choose between risking my weapon and have a upper hand in combat or a harder fight with my other weapons.

Monster Hunter has a very in deep equipment repair mechanic. There is another strategy layer to think when choosing a weapon since each one have different "levels of brittleness" . The player needs to think if it is better to repair it to have the best penetration or not give the monster a moment of respite. What makes the system great is that this is an actual choice, not an obvious one. Sometimes it is better to continue the beating and worry about repair later.

And there are games which repairing equipment doesn't add much gameplay-wise but it is adds to the atmosphere and the simulationist aspect. Like Morrowind. Repairing the equip seems a thing adventures supposed to do. It adds to the fantasy of being there even if it isn't 100% realist.

And every challenge in a game is artificial difficulty.
 
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brian0057

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I don't mind it. In the end, it's just another mechanic I have to deal with like stealth, supplies, combat, dialog, inventory, etc.
  • Far Cry 2: I always picked up brand new weapons every time I went to the shop so I never dealt with that.
  • System Shock 2: When your repair skill is high enough, you can basically forget about maintenance since you can repair a weapon back to a high level.
  • Breath of the Wild: The abundance of weapons in the game makes this a non-issue.
  • Fallout 3 and New Vegas: Repairing can get quite addictive.
Those that complain about weapon durability are probably the same ones that thought the planet scanning in Mass Effect 2 was a better mechanic than exploring with the Mako in the first game.
 
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_Ex_

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I've played a lot of RPGs that have deteriorating armor and weapons. Not once did I ever enjoy that aspect. It just feels like busy work keeping the equipment repaired constantly. Like a contrived extra layer of "gameplay" to add depth but in an annoying pissant way.
 

Pallas

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There have been games where it's not a huge deal, there have been games where I loathe it. But I can't ever say it has made a game better by having it in there. It doesn't really add realism because any damage your armor takes in battles has the realism cancelled out by having to repair say a bow or a gun after like 50 uses, which is not realistic at all. In the end, it just feels like an artificial way to make a game more "challenging" to developers when to us all it does it make inventory management more of a nuisance.

I guess if I had to reach for a positive and this is really reaching... in games that have a lot of loot and reward you with the same weapons and equipment over and over again, items damaging and becoming useless and/or breaking makes those hundred copies of "Iron mail" and "steel swords" you have actually useful instead of just purposeless loot. But in that case, the devs should just tweak the game so you don't get as much of the same loot at that point.
When it’s done properly, like I didn’t mind it in Elder Scrolls, Fallout series or even Witcher 3. If you count Dead island as an RPG then I’d put that as an example of how it’s implemented poorly, because unlike the former, that made repairing very frequently and very expensive in game. :/
 
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This might be unpopular opinion but I rather see weapons just break with no repairing mechanics over wasting my time repairing weapons. I LOVE Bloodborne but repairing weapons is such waste of time, it doesn't even add to the challenge because it doesn't take that much Blood Echoes to repair them.
Guess you should pray for a new Shadow Tower then.

I'd rather have a new King's Field though myself.
 

infinitys_7th

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Monster Hunter, BotW, and Fire Emblem are the only games I have liked it in.

Monster Hunter sharpness helps differentiate weapons of the same type further, and means you have to keep on your toes in fights because you get stunned if your attack bounces off. BotW has so many weapons so easy to find that it is never a problem, although I wish there were other unbreakable/self-repairing weapons like the Master Sword for quest rewards. Classic Fire Emblem was sort of a "survival SRPG" in that you had to face the odds with what you had and make do, and manage limited resources with future battles in mind; permadeath contributed to that.
 
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Isa

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Good question. I've rarely been upset about repair mechanics in games, with the only real off-putting situation being BotW. Its just too soon for me. But overall I actually enjoy it from time to time, but I also notice that few games REALLY push that feature to the point of it being kind of not necessary. I love damage mechanics in racers though, and a few (bad)fighters on OG Xbox had some interesting ideas for damage over time. I love how in rally games I need to factor when and how to repair my car with limited budget and crew choices that reflect my decisions. Also a HUGE favorite of mine but failed to capitalize on its mechanics due to a horribly short campaign would be MechWarrior 2 Mercenaries. I wanted a huge campaign where my every decision and action mattered, and I got some interesting branching paths with cool potential loot, but it ended way to soon man.

Funny memory. My best friend's first "souls" game was Bloodborne which I had got him to try with me, and we loved it and of course I got him to try nearly all the other titles save for Demons, but anyway, he didn't know we could repair our weapons so he'd spend all his money in the early game repurchasing his stuff. When I broke it to him next we played he felt so dumb haha.

Pro damage love/memories probably never to be seen again: Mercenaries on Xbox was and is still one of my favorite games man, just felt so badass with so many options available. And the grandpappy of destruction Red Faction Guerilla. Holy Hell I loved that one, and the mp kept me hooked for years. Jet packing through a roof in an office complex to avoid a foe I had stuck with high explosives, the huge mini nuke thing, and railgunning players across the map through buildings were some of my favorite memories.
 
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Sub_Level

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In Fallout 3/New Vegas its fun since it acts as a way to shorten your inventory and to make stuff you can sell for a higher $$$.
 
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Never liked it. If you want realism, fair enough, make a stick pole breakable. But if you're gonna give me limited usage on a crowbar or aluminum baseball bat....gtfo.

I know a lot of people loved BOTW but it got real annoying that a single weapon would last me like 4-5 enemies and then it would break.
 
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Chacranajxy

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I mean, I doubt too many people are going to say they like it, but it's one of those mechanics that's not in there because people like the idea, in and of itself. It's in there because it, implemented well, increases tension and forces the player to make choices about how to expend their resources. Which can be a good thing.
 
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ael85

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What happens is that they want to add some "realistic" elements and they completely missed the point. Stop adding chores to games just for the sake of it, it's a VIDEOGAME.

That being said, I really think it could be done right. It's hard but it would require to sit down and think about it (not just pay 50 gold to the blacksmith and it's instantly repaired). Maybe it could be the chance to change the blade of that sword that had an enchanted hilt? Maybe you can repair it with great materials that improve it or if you are in the wild and have the skill to repair it you can do a somewhat passable job just to get by until you get to the real blacksmith.

There are a lot of ways to make mechanics interesting but nobody cares.
 

Dark Star

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I don't mind it in Bloodborne. It makes me visit the Hunter's Dream more often, so I end up doing more customization and stuff, like runes, gems, fortification, etc alongside the repairs. Good for N00BS so they'll pay attention to their weapons, and upgrade along the way, rather than using the same Axe or Saw through the whole darn game lol. The repairs are also dirt cheap in terms of Blood Echos, so that's not a problem. I think it adds some realism and grounds you to an already fantastical universe.

In other games, like Witcher 3, I dislike it. There is no "hub" to teleport to repair your weapon like in Bloodborne. In Witcher 3 you have to go find a black smith or whatever to fix it for you, and that can be super annoying when you're far out in a forest or distant land away from civilization. It's less rewarding and tedious, overall. In Bloodborne, however, it's kind of a tack-on to the experience of upgrading and stats, which is somewhat enjoyable.
 
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zenspider

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No, it is shit design. And one of the reasons I dislike botw.
It can be, but not intrisically. It creates an economy around your abilities. MP, items, cooldowns, etc. operate the same way, just at a different time scale and level of strategy.

Breath of the Wild also has another level - it's particularly integrated with other systems - if you're weapons didn't break or have cooldowns, there would be less emergent combat and any sense of tension or survival-lite would be gone. It's annoying taken directly, but it not "shit design". I think it's pretty elegant design as it solves multiple problems and feeds into other economies and incentives.
 

GHG

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Who plays RPGs to not deal with systems?
This.

RPG's are supposed to be systems heavy games. If you can't handle the heat, get out the kitchen and stick to action games.

The bigger problem today is that we actually have action games masquerading as RPG's which in turn is leading to the dumbing down of the RPG genre as a whole.

Very few modern RPG games are actually worthy of the tag.
 

EightBit Man

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As long as it isn't like The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild it's perfectly fine. Think it can be a integral and enjoyable part of the gameplay as well, like in Fallout: New Vegas for example, hoping you'll find better and more durable weapons on your way. But even then, repairing items itself can give a feeling of reward too.
 
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DragoonKain

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This.

RPG's are supposed to be systems heavy games. If you can't handle the heat, get out the kitchen and stick to action games.

The bigger problem today is that we actually have action games masquerading as RPG's which in turn is leading to the dumbing down of the RPG genre as a whole.

Very few modern RPG games are actually worthy of the tag.
Not sure this applies here as many RPGs don’t have equipment damage and have been just fine. Including some of the most highly regarded RPGs ever.

It’s about what systems you want and which benefit the experience and which detract from it.
 

CRUNT

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One game I really enjoyed it in was EverQuest Online Adventures on PS2. It was kind of an old school go to a location and grind with a group kind of MMO. So since your equipment got damaged you would always want to keep in mind the location of the nearest mender. Most of the time people were cool and gave the tank in the group all the stackable loot because they would have the most expensive repair bill. It made for some nice interactions. The other cool thing is that outposts where menders were located became gathering points to hang out and find other groups.

For singleplayer games nothing really sticks out. I might enjoy it if there's actual strategy involved with it but if it's just a time/money sink then it might be a little annoying.
 

Rockondevil

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I hate it in any game.
BOTW took it to a whole other level which infuriated me. Whereas something like The Outer Worlds you generally upgrade before it matters, obviously until you reach near endgame and then it's annoying again.
 

MetalRain

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I think weapon breaking can add some tension to encounters, which is good thing. I liked how breaking was handled in ADOM. There are enemies that are more likely to break your weapon, there are traps that break your weapon and broken weapons are significantly less powerful.

While The Elder Scrolls: Oblivion had little tedious repair mechanic I quite liked it, maybe I just liked the repair sound.
 

cormack12

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Like most have said it depends how it's implemented. But I just see it as a permanent DoT debuff on the player.

In Breath of the Wild it worked or became a non issue, but I didn't like it because I felt the weapons degraded too quick and I like having a weapon thats cool and not swapping between club and other weapons i'm not a fan of. However, I can also see it works better than in Dark Souls as it forces you to try different weapons. In Dark Souls you can just equip one weapon and brute force your way through the game without ever really getting that blunt and sharp dmg suits different enemies. BotW forces you to come across the most efficient way and weapon by forcing you to use weapons you normally wouldn't.
In The Witcher 3, it was a legitimate pain in the ass. Again, I didn't mind visiting blacksmiths etc. but it was expensive (as were repair kits). I know it ties into Geralt being 'poor' and then the role play of stinging peasants for money and contracts but I felt it was wayyy over priced. Hey, I'm only an amateur so am not good enough to craft that for you - however I will take a third of your crowns to mend this low level crap because I can do that fine.....I would have preferred you being able to fix it from crafting materials yourself rather than find specific kits as well.
Bloodborne was absolutely pointless. Think I repaired like 6-8 times in the whole game and it cost like 500 echoes in total.
Diablo 3 the same, degradation becomes small fry when you get to socketing and gem creation. Just not needed.
Skyrim and Destiny 2 have other systems where you need to fill up soul gems to recharge magic infuse, or you need ammo drops (like heavy) otherwise the weapon cannot be used.
Three Houses is another one that seems to have made mis-steps. Especially with that party size, managing durability to that level seems overly harsh. I think it would be so much better if decent weapons had a decent base dmg level (matched to item level), and any extra damage by way of arts or by virtue of being enchanted just needs recharging. That's a balance between upgrading weapons being worthwhile, having a management overhead but not making them suddenly useless.

I don't think a lot of devs really develop or improve a lot of these 'systems'. They seem to go we need weapon degradation, then look at the same three archetypal ways it's currently been done instead of creating one that suits their game personally. Which means it usually ends up being not singificant enough to be anything other than a minor piece of busywork, or something so overbearing it becomes annoying.
 

TheSHEEEP

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It always depends on context.
If it is a mechanic just tacked on that doesn't really interact with the rest in any way, it's bad (see Skyrim, etc.). In such a case, it is like hunger/thirst mechanics in some RPGs, which are there "just because" but serve no purpose.

But if you have a real survival game on your hands, or a game in which resource management is otherwise central to the experience, it adds to the whole.
 

Matt_Fox

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I think positive progression through upgrades is a wholly more satisfying system for equipment, rather than punishment through downgrades.

For example, in Elder Scrolls there are many different types of armour but each type also has a condition rating, ranging from 'fine' to 'exquisite' all the way up to 'legendary'. The key thing is you can improve them through becoming better at Smithing if you choose. This empowers the player, but it requires use of a precious perk to do so.

Rather than equipment downgrading itself through use (player being punished just for playing the game) there are better ways of 'limiting' a players ability to become overpowered, such as a cost to arrows/ammo, a special weapon power that has to recharge, or an encumbrance weight limit. These add tactics without the enforced busywork tedium of survival gameplay.
 
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Herr Edgy

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This is usually due to balancing. The devs want to have some kind of gold sink (generally it costs money), and what's easier than just proclaiming something broken and demanding gold to get it back? It's kind of like a hostage situation.

That being said, my personaly enemy #1 in modern game design is the streamlining of mechanics. Everything has to stay on the path, exceptions will be shot at sight.

Why are there no effects caused by weapon durability other than unusability or a stat decrease so drastic it becomes pointless to use? Why not have unique modifiers for different kinds of weapons? Guns jam, broken blades have shorter reach, a ripped bow string converts the bow into a weak staff-like weapon. Armor's a bit more difficult due to the passive nature of it. But even then, there could be consequences, stat-related or not: an annoying squeaking sound when wearing plate armor because it has to be maintained that could affect sound perception of enemies, for example.
If you wanted to go triple A you could also have areas that don't protect well anymore (think of some ripped chain mail) and offer literally 0 protection if hit at the specific area.

Two very game-y examples that were brought up are Dark Souls and Monster Hunter, where durability might, even if only slightly, have an impact on the gameplay. In MH it's pretty unique whereas in Dark Souls the existence of high-durability weapons such as the crystal weapons is justified by lore and extends into gameplay.

That's also what I loved about the original Xenoblade. Most plot points had some kind of effect in gameplay. Be it the future-seeing both in plot and gameplay, the relations of the characters directly influencing multiple mechanics in combat such as morale, the crafting of gems... the inability to hit Mechons with the Monado. Even if applied inconsistently at times, putting in the effort to push ludonarrative resonance (as opposed to 'just not doing things that are dissonant') at large is what games as a medium are meant to be in my opinion.

Mechanics that have no relation to other mechanics have no place in gaming.